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  • what are the common EQ settings

    Hi all, I'm setting up my mixwiz 16:2 again this weekend for a gig. I was wondering what are the common settings for snare,kick, toms, bass guitar and vocals regardless of the room.
    i.e bass guitar (HF dial) should normally be set to what?

  • #2
    This is a pretty open ended question. A lot can depend on the style that you are playing. Best advice I can give is to set it to what sounds best. You are going to have different EQ settings for different rooms.

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    • #3
      Ideally, flat across the board.
      -

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      • #4
        This is a pretty open ended question. A lot can depend on the style that you are playing. Best advice I can give is to set it to what sounds best. You are going to have different EQ settings for different rooms.


        Start flat. Then, use the eq until the instrument sounds right to your ear. You have to rely on your ear for this.
        Dale Christenson
        Sound4U
        A local sound provider serving Oklahoma and surrounding areas.
        http://sound4u.co
        Presonus: RM32ai mixer, CS18ai control surface, SL328ai speakers, SL16.4.2 mixer
        Peavey: DTH S4 tops
        JBL: SRX728 Subs
        Driverack PA (for tops)
        Driverack PA2 (for subs)

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        • #5
          i've seen this before, where folks think instruments or other sound sources have an eq 'setting' etc, and maybe to some small degree there is truth to that - but as you grow in your understanding of how these things work you may find that trying to itemize/categorize sources into freq bands or settings is irrelevant and a misunderstanding of how basic things operate.

          really what you need to do/learn to do is hear a source and be able to understand if you should try and change things with an eq, how to change them, how changing them will work with the other sources, or even not change them at all. this is easier said than done, how can you know without failing a few times (or years).

          my advice is this; try the eqs. if you want to make a change, do it. listen to the change, dont decide if the change is good or bad right away, and always have the bypass button handy. i have this thing i do, and when i taught school i taught the students to do it as well: when i record a stereo concert i always allow myself to try any eq, comp, limiter, effect etc when i am making the cd of the concert. if i want to add something i do without hesitation. i play with it, set it different, add something more, and when i believe i have something great - i bypass everything - and everytime it sounds better bypassed; without having done anything at all.

          but at that point i know it sounds better without doing anything to it, because i already did everything to it*

          *i find this is never the case with multitracked live or even live audio, in those cases eq is often required to fix a large problem. my point is that eq doesnt make things better, just different.
          band status - "its complicated"

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          • #6
            Flat flat flat. Subtract if necessary.
            Thanks,
            Bill Cronheim
            Entertainment Systems Corporation
            Back stage since 1965
            Equipment specialist since 1973

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            • #7
              Flat is ideal. Otherwise, doctor as need be. Plus siding suggests deeper problems.

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              • #8
                I always engage the HPF on vocals, and may use it on other instruments like snare, uke, and guitar.

                Otherwise, mostly flat.
                - BandDad

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                • #9
                  Most all of the microphones that we use have a large response boost (from proximity effect) centered around 200Hz, and an engineered in presence peak somewhere between 2kHz and 10kHz. As such, with most sources, compensation will need to be made for these mic anomalies, lest the sound of each source be very "scooped" in the middle.

                  http://www.padrick.net/LiveSound/Proximity.jpg

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                  • #10
                    Most all of the microphones that we use have a large response boost (from proximity effect) centered around 200Hz, and an engineered in presence peak somewhere between 2kHz and 10kHz. As such, with most sources, compensation will need to be made for these mic anomalies, lest the sound of each source be very "scooped" in the middle.

                    http://www.padrick.net/LiveSound/Proximity.jpg


                    unless you use those features by choosing appropriately. i rarely counteract the natural characteristics of a microphone, or else i wouldnt choose that microphone.

                    if people didnt want or didnt intend to utilize those characteristics they wouldnt be made that way.
                    band status - "its complicated"

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                    • #11
                      I use the same mixer and I usually start everything at dead center at "0" (flat) like all above has mentioned. Rooms very, indoors-outdoors, different singers or muso's? Different mic's?
                      My wife uses an EV RE2 cordless headset and its very bright on top so I always have to do some cutting like around 4k. I sometimes boost very little in the mid's for some warmth. This I have to do every gig, but its the same singer with a hi voice using the same mic.
                      One particular male vocalist that joins us has alot of lows so I try to do some cutting around 200hz-300hz'ish to clean things up alittle. Thats with a SM58. Last weekend my cordless 58 was acting up real bad and put him on a different house mic, a cordless AT (lowend unit) and it sounded pretty good with him just flat.

                      I do use the HPF on just about everything except for kick drum, keys and Bass guitar.

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                      • #12
                        what you need to do/learn to do is hear a source and be able to understand if you should try and change things with an eq, how to change them, how changing them will work with the other sources, or even not change them at all. this is easier said than done, how can you know without failing a few times (or years).


                        Well said!

                        EQing isn't something that's done just because you can. It's only done if you must. As Coaster points out, Listening is the key. Learning to listen criticaly can take a lifetime. IMO the best approach is to start with a well tuned and setup system, and try to get the best possible sound by firstly making the instrument sound good, secondly using the right mic in the right placment and lastly adding EQ if necessary.

                        The one and only EQ rule I have (remember rules are made to be broken), is to start with a HPF on everything but bass instruments (I.E. Kick, Bass, Lesli Lo mics, some synth's and rarely bass vocalist). This just keeps low end bleed out of the mics and makes for a much less muddy mix. If you have a variable HPF then use it on everything (although the aformentioned instruments may be set as low as 35 to 40 hz). For most everything else it's 80hz and above (high hat & cymbal mics I've gone as far as 600hz). Once again, use your ears, sweep the filter up until it starts thining out the instrument and then back it back down just below that.

                        ALWAYS try to get a good sound by tuning and placment before you resort to EQing.

                        That's my .02
                        J.R. Previously jrble

                        See my Dog Of The Hair studio at: http://www.dogoth.com/studio/

                        Quote from someone: Flat response? Get out the jack and change the tire.
                        If you think "power is knowledge", you have it backwards.

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                        • #13
                          Start flat.

                          If something is really annoying through the PA and you want to turn it down, chances are you need to CUT something via EQ. Cut the mids and turn the frequency knob until you find the annoying thing.

                          If something sounds really flat, lifeless and boring, try to BOOST something via EQ. Boost the mids and turn the frequency knob until it sounds more interesting. If it doesn't? It just sucks - set it flat and leave it be.

                          Treble - if it's making your ears hurt and cutting a high mid didn't fix it... cut the treble. If it needs more, add it (though I doubt you will.)

                          Bass - If it sounds boomy, cut. If it sounds thin, add. I don't usually boost much, but I'll cut a lot if I need to.

                          I'm not a pro, I'm not the best, but my rules seem to keep the club owner, patrons and band happy when I do run sound.
                          Current Projects:

                          Targeting Aorta - Industrial-ish Rock

                          Red Moped - 80s/90s Alternative Rock Covers

                          Assorted Blog Ramblings and personal info, etc.

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                          • #14
                            We stopped using a EQ about 1yr. ago and I like our sound much better.

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                            • #15
                              We stopped using a EQ about 1yr. ago and I like our sound much better.


                              Channel strip EQ or a 31-Band house EQ? This makes me think that the the equipment was being used improperly or the operator had limited experience.
                              "A performer without techs is standing naked, on a dark stage, and no one can hear them. A tech without a performer... has marketable skills."

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