Harmony Central Forums
Announcement
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Help with stage piano

Collapse



X
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Casio,

    The best option when you have a budget.

    Regards,

    Comment


    • #17
      So I had decided to go with the P90. I tried it again for an hour with my headphones and liked it. The price is all right and it includes a few extras. But now I heard of some metalic ringing and read some very old posts in which people seem to think the P80 is better than the P90. What do you think about this?

      Comment


      • #18
        I used to have a P80. It was my first DP after not having an acoustic piano for a number of years. At first, I liked the piano sounds, but after a couple years, I could no longer stand them. Playing it would drive me up the wall. This led me to buying Gigastudio, a software sampler you run on computers, which you can load piano samples into. My plan was to play that from the P80. I then discovered that the P80 was a horrible midi controller, with cryptic menus and limited functionality, unlike the controls for the built in sounds, which are very intuitive and easy to use. Plus, the keybed has a hard plasticy bottom out which got to my hands, and the action was heavy, but otherwise a very good action.

        I gave up on the P80 and got a Kawai MP9500, which has much better piano samples, and a powerful midi controller.

        I would never recommend the P80 to anyone. The technology on the P80 is over ten years old. The computer technology its based on is hundreds of times more powerful and cheaper nowadays, and any newer keyboard, either Yamaha or some other brand, will be much better. A used Kawai MP4 would be a better choice, if you can find one. I would also look into the Casios. Their digital pianos are low in price, and though I've never played one, their reputation is they have great sound and great action for the price, and are very light.

        Comment


        • #19
          Hi again,

          I am about to buy a P80. Now this is based on the hours I spent playing the P90. I liked the sounds and how you could play with the brilliance controller; the AP sounded good to me, and the price is right. I realize it's not a new piano, but I think it's perfect for what I want. Before I go for it and finally stop asking questions here, would anyone tell me if the sound of the P80 is much different from the one of the P90? Having liked the P90, is there a chance I will find the P80 very different and not like it?

          Thank you very much for your help.

          Edit: also, is the wooden bass sound as cool as the P90 one? That's really funny to play with.

          Comment


          • #20
            Hi again,

            I am about to buy a P80. Now this is based on the hours I spent playing the P90. I liked the sounds and how you could play with the brilliance controller; the AP sounded good to me, and the price is right. I realize it's not a new piano, but I think it's perfect for what I want. Before I go for it and finally stop asking questions here, would anyone tell me if the sound of the P80 is much different from the one of the P90? Having liked the P90, is there a chance I will find the P80 very different and not like it?

            Thank you very much for your help.

            Edit: also, is the wooden bass sound as cool as the P90 one? That's really funny to play with.


            Yes, that is exactly what will happen. No joke...

            Just because you liked the P90 - which is newer technology than the P80 - what on earth makes you think you'll like the P80?

            I mean, going the other way around (seeing/hearing the P80 and then buying the P90) would make sense but not your way.
            "Gigito ergo sum: I Gig, therefore I Am."


            Keys:
            Yamaha MotifXF6 - (bottom tier) & Korg M361 (top)
            Roland RD300GX (88 keys - smaller gigs & when I play left hand bass)

            Mixers, Spkrs.:
            (2) QSC K12's, (2) QSC K10's, (2) QSC K8's
            1 JBL PRX715XLF Subwoofer
            Motion Sound KP200S & KP100S kybd. amps (rarely use any more)
            Allen & Heath MixWiz3, Soundcraft MFXi8, Yamaha MG82cx,
            Mackie ProFX12, Alesis TransActive 50, [Samson PL1602 - For Sale]
            Fender Rumble 100 Bass Amp (for Ibanez SR500 Bass)

            Comment


            • #21
              Well, it's the same brand and one model followed the other. They look alike, so I thought the improvement would not be huge, otherwise they would have bothered changing the looks. So it is much worse, then...

              Comment


              • #22
                Well, it's the same brand and one model followed the other. They look alike, so I thought the improvement would not be huge, otherwise they would have bothered changing the looks. So it is much worse, then...


                Umm... I don't know how much worse but cjsm states (several posts up from here) that he wouldn't recommend it... I remember the P90 - it was a solid digital piano. The P120 as well - which had the built-in speakers.

                The obvious question here is this: if you played a P90 and liked the sounds on the P90 - why not just buy a P90?
                "Gigito ergo sum: I Gig, therefore I Am."


                Keys:
                Yamaha MotifXF6 - (bottom tier) & Korg M361 (top)
                Roland RD300GX (88 keys - smaller gigs & when I play left hand bass)

                Mixers, Spkrs.:
                (2) QSC K12's, (2) QSC K10's, (2) QSC K8's
                1 JBL PRX715XLF Subwoofer
                Motion Sound KP200S & KP100S kybd. amps (rarely use any more)
                Allen & Heath MixWiz3, Soundcraft MFXi8, Yamaha MG82cx,
                Mackie ProFX12, Alesis TransActive 50, [Samson PL1602 - For Sale]
                Fender Rumble 100 Bass Amp (for Ibanez SR500 Bass)

                Comment


                • #23
                  First, because of the metalic ringing; I suppose it would turn out to be irritating and I don't want to risk. Secondly, because the used market here is limited, and I can't find one for sale.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Well, after all this time I am now inclined to just go with the CP33. This will be my main instrument, may I should spend the extra cash.

                    Anyway, now it's the time to find the best possible deal on one. The best price I have found so far is 830

                    Comment


                    • #25

                      I've been looking for ads and I've found several Yamaha P80 and some Rolands (RD 300 SX, FP9, RD 600).
                      What's your opinion on the P80, and how does it compare to the newer models? Also, would an RD 300 SX be better than a 600? What are your thoughts on Roland vs Yamaha? The Yamahas sounded more clear to me.


                      P80 was a very good stage piano, if you care only about piano sounds this boards is for you. (or newer yamaha stage P??)
                      I had P80 for 2 years until I broke few keys and motherboard.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Hey, everyone,

                        I've been playing a Korg C-720 for three or four years now. I'm tired of it and I am looking for a portable piano. Not a Korg, this time. I understand mine is top of the line (before the SV, anyway), but I really don't like the sound or the keys.

                        So, I in Europe (Milan) and I'm looking for something used. I've tried some pianos and I liked the P95 and P155; the new Roland FP-7 is also very nice. I was disappointed with the Kurzweil PC3LE, however.

                        I've been looking for ads and I've found several Yamaha P80 and some Rolands (RD 300 SX, FP9, RD 600).

                        What's your opinion on the P80, and how does it compare to the newer models? Also, would an RD 300 SX be better than a 600? What are your thoughts on Roland vs Yamaha? The Yamahas sounded more clear to me.

                        I only care about acoustic pianos (I've got a real Rhodes and I don't like playing organ on weighted keys) and keybed, and I will be using a pair of Grado's.

                        Thanks very much for your help.


                        I play a RD300sx. Its been a good board , and is great for a guy thats more interested in quick pre sets on traditional sounds. The SX is out of production ,,, and has been replaced by the GX. Personally I like the action of the SX better than the GX. Little lighter weighted action and it has plastic keys. Both boards maintain the quick and easy pre sets.

                        Its been a great board for the kind of music our band plays. Older classic rock, country , and beach stuff. We are not the kind of band that needs alot of what I call soundy stuff. I use rhodes, piano, organ, accordian, steel drums and thats about it. I think the 300 series roland stuff are great boards, and great for guys who just need to play keyboards. There are enough other sounds on there to get you by on most music without having to do alot of programming.
                        "you mess with him and you mess with the whole trailer park"

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          To be honest, after having tried a the RD-300GX and the FP7, I don't think the Roland sound is for me. I decided to go with a Yamaha. The P80 might be a little too old, I'm afraid I am going to be disappointed with the sound, so I'm considering the CP33 and trying to find the best deal on one here in Europe. The main problem is that I won't be able to try neither of the boards before I buy them. I've tried several Yamahas, but not these.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Good idea

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Thanks for your help. If anyone knows a good deal on a CP33 in Europe, I may be interested.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                I really don't like the sound or feel of C-720 stage pianos.. The Roland FP7F is a lot nicer to play. The FP7F has a firmer (but a little lighter) key touch. The firmness more than makes up for the lightness... I am learning Piano from Piano Lesson, These are piano lessons, but not the boring piano lessons of the past. Instead, these are DVD and CD piano lessons so you can hear and see what each finger should do and what each chord looks like. You'll love these piano lessons! You'll view your old sheet music with new eyes and new ideas for exciting piano playing!


                                Ummm... "Got Troll"?
                                "Gigito ergo sum: I Gig, therefore I Am."


                                Keys:
                                Yamaha MotifXF6 - (bottom tier) & Korg M361 (top)
                                Roland RD300GX (88 keys - smaller gigs & when I play left hand bass)

                                Mixers, Spkrs.:
                                (2) QSC K12's, (2) QSC K10's, (2) QSC K8's
                                1 JBL PRX715XLF Subwoofer
                                Motion Sound KP200S & KP100S kybd. amps (rarely use any more)
                                Allen & Heath MixWiz3, Soundcraft MFXi8, Yamaha MG82cx,
                                Mackie ProFX12, Alesis TransActive 50, [Samson PL1602 - For Sale]
                                Fender Rumble 100 Bass Amp (for Ibanez SR500 Bass)

                                Comment













                                Working...
                                X