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Got lots of synths, but never had a Minimoog D. How "special" is it? get one?

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  • Got lots of synths, but never had a Minimoog D. How "special" is it? get one?

    so as a hardcore analog synth devotee, ive got pretty much every synth i've ever had on my wishlist at this point. but there's one synth that i've never had, and it's really the only thing that i'd consider buying at this point: a minimoog D. i just never came across one, and never looked that hard.

    while tuning synths is never that hard, i'm not totally dying to have another synth to scale/tune every year. with that said, upkeep is not a big issue for me; i dont mind rehabbing old synths. i'm curious about a mini. i've got a rogue and a micromoog that i got on the cheap via CL. i dont know how close it really gets me to the "mini experience".

    take money out of the equation. would you mini owners suggest one? thanks, rj

  • #2
    How much do you use and like your Rogue and Micro? The Mini really is the Moog to have if you only have one. Which is why it still commands such a high price. It's definitely a player's synth which is why most of the virtuoso prog/fusion synth soloists used one. If you just plan on driving it with a sequencer you're missing the point...a lot of owners think the feel of the keybed is the best ever, period.

    Whether it must be the D vs. a Voyager is a matter of personal taste I suppose. Most D owners insist the Voyager lacks the real mojo (but hey what would you expect them to say).

    Automatic Gainsay should be here soon to convince you further
    My VCAs go to 11

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    • #3
      The Mini D is a really compelling instrument. It makes you want to play it after a few minutes of touching it and hearing the tones. You first get the impression that you will get bored quickly giving the simplistic nature of its architecture, limited modulation, monophonic nature. Yet when you have one at hand, you are drawn to it irresistibly. It's quite unexplainable. Get one !

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      • #4

        Automatic Gainsay should be here soon to convince you further


        Wrong forum Meatball.

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        • #5
          As far as the Minimoog vs. Voyager comparisons go, a lot of people seem to agree with what Yoozer has been posting about it on Gearslutz since making a comparison himself.

          linkie
          http://www.reverbnation.com/christianschulze

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          • #6


            Whether it must be the D vs. a Voyager is a matter of personal taste I suppose. Most D owners insist the Voyager lacks the real mojo (but hey what would you expect them to say).


            The OP did not mention the Voyager, actually. For all you know, he may have already considered and rejected the Voyager as an option.

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            • #7
              things


              We've got 4 pages and counting already - http://www.gearslutz.com/board/electronic-music-instruments-electronic-music-production/664349-so-whats-actually-like-owning-model-d.html
              "Part of an instrument is what it can do, and part of it is what you do to it" - Suzanne Ciani, 197x.
              Synthesizer Programming Megathread - add your tips & tricks or ask how to recreate sounds!

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              • #8
                the only way you can answer the question is to get yourself in front of one.

                if you get the "holy ****************!" feeling, you need one. if you feel "meh" about it, stay away.

                i would definitely ditch the Rogue if you got one. the Micro is just plain _weird_ though, and totally worth having alongside a Minimoog. i'm only going to get rid of my Micromoog because i'm getting a Multimoog soon and there's no point in having both.
                main: http://suitandtieguy.com
                Lawrence Miles style rants: http://suitandtieguy.livejournal.com
                handbuilt boutique synthesiser modules: http://stgsoundlabs.com
                my digital albums: http://suitandtieguy.bandcamp.com

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                • #9
                  Wrong forum Meatball.


                  he's been here in the past...
                  My VCAs go to 11

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The D has a grit and edge to it not present on any other Moog, or clone. It was actually a design flaw that turned out to be a happy accident.
                    Orgasms frighten me

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                    • #11
                      What about some other discreet analog electronics modules like the Macbeth x-series modules or other? If I were going to spend money on analog stuff, I would grow my modular some more. I can think of about 20 modules off the top of my head that are not "necessary" but that I would like to have
                      Gribs

                      ...Music can be used to stimulate mass emotion, while mathematics cannot; and musical incapacity is recognized (no doubt rightly) as mildly discreditable, whereas most people are so frightened of the name of mathematics that they are ready, quite unaffectedly, to exaggerate their own mathematical stupidity.

                      G.H. Hardy in A Mathematician's Apology (London 1941).

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If cost is no option, definitely get one. Personally, I've never come across a real one. Thank God, because I'd have to have it and can't afford it. Besides I need a clavinet first.
                        Alesis QS8, Ensoniq Fizmo, Oberheim OB-12, E-MU Vintage Keys Plus, Rhodes 73 Stage, Wurlitzer 145, Wurlitzer 146B, Wurlitzer 206A, Yamaha CP-70B, Yamaha CP-30, Kawai EP-608, Hohner D6 Clavinet, Mellotron M400, Hammond M-3, Vox Jaguar, Baldwin Fun Machine, Wurlitzer MLM, SCI Pro-One, Moog Rogue, Arp Explorer I, Moog Opus 3, Arp Omni 2, Multivox MX-202, Crumar Orchestrator, Crumar Performer, Akai AX80, Akai AX60 w/S612 sampler, Korg Poly 800, Ensoniq Mirage, Roland CR-78.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The D has a grit and edge to it not present on any other Moog, or clone. It was actually a design flaw that turned out to be a happy accident.


                          no. the 60s modular system has a similar grit and edge to it.
                          main: http://suitandtieguy.com
                          Lawrence Miles style rants: http://suitandtieguy.livejournal.com
                          handbuilt boutique synthesiser modules: http://stgsoundlabs.com
                          my digital albums: http://suitandtieguy.bandcamp.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            get one and get a late-model one (like a '79 or '80) since the oscillators are really stable. the minimoog- like the prodigy- would take serious sound design talent to figure out how to make sound bad.

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                            • #15
                              I cannot speak for the model D, I have never had the joy of playing one. I have however spent a lot of time with both the Voyager and the Little Phatty in the studio, and Voyager is the best and easiest solo instrument I have ever played. The harder and better you operate and play it, the harder it plays back and does it's part. The closest thing to a player on an electric guitar but in the keyboard world I think...... Part of the magic is in it's monophonic design.

                              Now if they could just make a Minimoog with mono/poly to switch on and off, like the old Korg, another fav of mine.

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