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NAMM Coverage--What Do You Want To See?

Hey everybody--
As the years have gone on and more and more outlets are covering the NAMM show each year, we thought it would be a good idea to take the pulse of the community and find out what you like and don't like about the way NAMM is covered, not only by HC but in general. Obviously, we want to do more of the former and less of the latter.

For several years now, the focus has been on producing the short, from-the-floor demos and product overviews with folks from each manufacturer. Sometimes quantity is placed above quality, but the goal has always been to show you as much of the show and new products as possible.

Oftentimes, producing so many videos means late nights in the hotel room with room service, editing and rendering until the wee hours. As you probably know, there's a whole other side to NAMM, which is what goes on after hours at private events and parties, and our focus on show-floor videos means we really don't take part in any of that.

So, we're putting it to you. When NAMM rolls around in January, what's going to get you excited and make you feel like you're part of the action? Continue to crank out product vids? Less video, more photographs? After-hours coverage? Celebrity encounters/performances? Let us know!

We welcome your thoughts and suggestions and are looking forward to Harmony Central being the premier destination for NAMM coverage in 2015.
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  • #46
    Jon, this is a great point that you bring up. We are hearing a lot of musicians start off wanting that "maximum control" for their setup and you can get there with your JamHub as you've described. People are still thinking of it as a conventional mixer and because there's nothing quite like it out there, it makes sense to go down that path at the start.



    Over time, what I've found with my band is this, we started out with a lot of input separation but now it isn't all that necessary. You see, part of playing in an ensemble is learning how you FIT in the music/ensemble with your vocals, instruments and levels. This is a powerful concept when you think about it ...



    With a JamHub, after a song, you can quickly look at everyone's individual mixes and see what they are hearing ... well, see how they are mixing. If the bass players mix is DRASTICALLY different than your mix, then you are not playing "together" but are simply playing "at the same time". Let's kick that around for a second.



    If each musician creates their own sonic bubble, that is they use their section controls for evil not good (put angel emoticon here), then when that band goes to play live they might be in trouble. Likewise, when they hit the studio they will not be ready to deal with a full band mix ... does that make sense? Looking at section mixes can help ensure that we are listening to each other by comparing individual mixes.



    For example, with my band, there are times when we have very different mixes, usually when we are working new songs out. But as the songs come together we want to hear what everyone else is doing and the individual section mixes start to look VERY similar. The only thing that tends to be different are the input trim and the headphone volume (our bass player is deaf).



    There's always a bit of individuality in the mixes, but there isn't a mix that dumps someone completely. It's usually the drummer and bass player with a similar mix and the keys and guitar (me) player with a similar mix but each mix is not exactly the same (just like on stage). In fact, we use a GreenRoom to rehears and use 5 sections, one per guy except for the singer/keyboard/guitar player who uses two sections because he plays two different instruments.



    There is no one way to use a JamHub, and we are excited to learn how customers are using the product. But we know this, the JamHub affords new levels of control and conversation regarding music making. And it makes is simple to do. Knobs don’t lie.



    To get people over the first hump, sometimes we say, think of each section as its own mixer. BUT that the JamHub is like 5 or 7 mixers all packed into one small box. It's not exactly correct, the JamHub does more IMO, but sometimes that helps to explain the fundamental section/channel concept quickly and folks to get the idea.



    I hope that helps,

    Steve
    www.JamHub.com

    Comment


    • #47
      PS All you private message people. Post your questions here. No need to keep it private. We are here to help. Don't worry about the flamers, we all know a flame post when we read one and disregard it quickly.
      www.JamHub.com

      Comment


      • #48






        Quote Originally Posted by JamHubSteve
        View Post

        If the bass players mix is DRASTICALLY different than your mix, then you are not playing "together" but are simply playing "at the same time".




        This is very true. The band I have been helping along exhibited this tendency: One player's mix was drastically different from all his other bandmates'. And sure enough, onstage, he was too loud--alarmingly so.








        If each musician creates their own sonic bubble, that is they use their section controls for evil not good (put angel emoticon here), then when that band goes to play live they might be in trouble.



        Again, that corresponds to my own experience. The above-mentioned member is also the most inexperienced--both in terms of playing in a band and in terms of dealing with mixes and headphones (it can be disorienting at first). This person, while having no problem in the intellect department, was clearly behind the curve when trying to adapt to the JamHub in rehearsal. Perhaps his wacked-out mix was part of his anxiety: he probably needed to hear his own parts at near-overpowering levels to maintain focus.



        In this way, the JamHub reveals a "listening problem" that otherwise might have gone undetected. Perhaps the band can help this person along, to get more acclimated to playing in an ensemble. (Steve, if you put this in your marketing "* Use the JamHub to diagnose your bandmates' hearing deficiencies!" I want credit .)








        For example, with my band, there are times when we have very different mixes, usually when we are working new songs out. But as the songs come together we want to hear what everyone else is doing and the individual section mixes start to look VERY similar. The only thing that tends to be different are the input trim and the headphone volume (our bass player is deaf).



        Great advice. That should be the natural "mix trajectory" for all bands!








        There's always a bit of individuality in the mixes, but there isn't a mix that dumps someone completely. It's usually the drummer and bass player with a similar mix and the keys and guitar (me) player with a similar mix but each mix is not exactly the same (just like on stage).



        Again, a good guideline. Thanks!








        Knobs don’t lie.



        Sometimes they can, if you make them. Roger Nichols tells a story about mixing Steely Dan. He said he couldn't believe people were sneaking into the control at night to write down his EQ settings for the various channels. "They changed all the time!" he said, incredulously. "They weren't static, and what was left at the end of the day was just what they happened to be when we stopped playing!" But to get his revenge, Roger said, he would carefully pull the EQ knobs off their splines and re-seat them in completely wacky positions--just to mess with the voyeurs! Don't know if it's true, but it's what Roger said.
        Jon Chappell
        Follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jon_chappell
        Check out my website: http://jonchappell.com

        Comment


        • #49





          Steve, if you put this in your marketing:



          * "Use the JamHub to diagnose your bandmates' hearing deficiencies!"



          I want credit.



          That's a deal!
          www.JamHub.com

          Comment


          • #50






            Quote Originally Posted by Jon Chappell
            View Post

            (Steve, if you put this in your marketing "* Use the JamHub to diagnose your bandmates' hearing deficiencies!" I want credit .)




            Actually, I received a P.M. from a user of the TourBus (the high-end model with the onboard recording function) who says his band uses the JamHub for just that--listening back to their own mixes.



            For example, if you're in Section 5 and you want to hear a recording of your mix--to check, say, your vocal intonation, which, presumably will be most prominent in your own section--you simply set up Section R's controls to mirror Section 5's. Record onto the card and listen back. You're hearing how you sound to others (and it's also good for you to hear yourself objectively, without having to play and sing while doing it), and the mix you're using. If your levels are unduly high with respect to others in the band, it may explain why you can't, say, blend your harmonies, sing in tune, or play as tightly in the pocket as you would if your bandmates were in a better balance.



            If you have to be louder than anyone else in the monitors, it usually means you're not as secure in your parts as you could be.
            Jon Chappell
            Follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jon_chappell
            Check out my website: http://jonchappell.com

            Comment


            • #51
              Very cool idea. We are learning a lot about how people are using JamHubs to improve the band and for uses other than simply silent rehearsals ... for example in churches and as in-ear monitor mixers both at rehearsal and live.



              Fun stuff!
              www.JamHub.com

              Comment


              • #52
                Just checking in to say that I used the JamHub this weekend, and am finding it a really good tool for transitioning from the the rehearsal to the live setting.



                I practiced sitting around acoustically with a male and female vocalist rehearsing harmonies. I sang the low baritone (the hard one). The female sang lead, and the other guy sang the high harmony (tenor), which is fairly easy to hear. I'm the one that got stuck with the "leftover note" of whatever chord we were harmonizing.



                The JH helps you with tuning by sending the sound through headphones directly into your ear canal; you're no longer relying on hearing the notes ambiently. While it's true you can do this with any mixer, the JH just makes it that much easier. For trouble spots, I turn my vocal part up slightly (the rest of the band doesn't have to know). When I'm secure with my part, I put the mic back down to where it should be for the house sound.



                It's interesting what people's different settings are for the "house sound." You can tell this by peeking at other bandmembers' section settings. I can tell you this: they're all different from each other. And certainly a third party who objectively mixes the sound via the R section would have something different again.
                Jon Chappell
                Follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jon_chappell
                Check out my website: http://jonchappell.com

                Comment


                • #53
                  How does an Acoustic/Electric plugged straight into the JamHub sound? I'm thinking this could be the perfect addition to my music room for the jam sessions I've started having with friends but some of the guys are strictly Acoustic/Electric players and don't have any modelers or DIs so they would be plugging straight into the JamHub.



                  If everyone is going to need some sort of modeling amp, ME processor, or DI to have a decent sound then I might be better off just getting a powered mixer and some small PA speakers.





                  -Kit

                  Comment


                  • #54






                    Quote Originally Posted by kit_strong
                    View Post

                    How does an Acoustic/Electric plugged straight into the JamHub sound? I'm thinking this could be the perfect addition to my music room for the jam sessions I've started having with friends but some of the guys are strictly Acoustic/Electric players and don't have any modelers or DIs so they would be plugging straight into the JamHub.




                    If anything, an acoustic-electric sounds better than an electric, because you usually run these types of guitars fairly straight and flat. It's electrics that benefit from modeling and processing. The onboard f/x on the JamHub are available only through the XLR jack.








                    If everyone is going to need some sort of modeling amp, ME processor, or DI to have a decent sound then I might be better off just getting a powered mixer and some small PA speakers. -Kit



                    Kit, I think you might be confusing a JamHub with a mixer (powered or otherwise). They are not the same thing at all, and your statement above doesn't really make a direct comparison--it's an apples vs. oranges kind of thing (or almost a non sequitur). The JamHub gives everyone in the ensemble an individual mix and while allowing you to practice silently. A mixer--even one with a headphone distribution amp--doesn't come close to accomplishing the same thing.
                    Jon Chappell
                    Follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jon_chappell
                    Check out my website: http://jonchappell.com

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Looks like we lost a post or two with the roll back.



                      There's a great "how to" if you are thinking of using JamHubs for an in-ear mixer for a House of Worship situation. You can read all about it here:



                      http://www.flickr.com/photos/4295715...7623825414457/



                      We didn't optimize the design for this purpose, but it looks like he's got a good idea.



                      We are also hearing back a LOT from studio owners who are using them for musicians to mix themselves in their headphones during recording. They put the JamHub "down stream" of the desks. Cool application as well.



                      Fun stuff. We learn something new everyday.

                      Steve
                      www.JamHub.com

                      Comment


                      • #56






                        Quote Originally Posted by JamHubSteve
                        View Post

                        Looks like we lost a post or two with the roll back.




                        Yes, we did, and I apologize for that. In addition to your link on the worship application, copied below is the other post with some useful info.



                        Posted by JamHubSteve on April 28, 2010:

                        "One more thing. We are getting a LOT of interest from "School of Rock" programs. If folks here in this thread would like to hear more about that application, please let me know and I can share what others are doing. One teacher told it to me something like this:



                        "Parents get that a sports team has individual skills development, team skills development and the game. I do the same thing with music now that I have the JamHub. I teach kids music on a variety of instruments, this is the individual skills development.



                        "Then I get them together to play with other musicians, guitar, bass and drums. This is the team skills development. I record each session on my Mac in garage band, with just two clicks, I can send an MP3 home to the kids and the parents. They both love it.



                        "Then 'game time' is a quarterly concert at a local VFW hall.



                        "JamHubs make this so much easier and the kids love it.



                        "I hope that helps,"



                        Steve





                        "Attached is a photo from another, similar type of private lesson setup. You can see the three young rockers and the teacher in the shot. And a computer capturing the recording. More kids making music and not playing an XBOX is a good thing if you ask me. I like XBOX, but I like music making more."
                        Jon Chappell
                        Follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jon_chappell
                        Check out my website: http://jonchappell.com

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Hi everyone,



                          We get this question all the time, "What about acoustic drums?" and we simply say "Yeah, a JamHub works great with them, but you don't get the 'silent' benefit of the system."



                          We decided that we needed to show people what we meant so we made this little video. All we did is mic the drums with a cheap little mixer, send that output (in stereo) to the JamHub and hook everyone else up with "normal" JamHub gear like modeling pedals, the keyboard's line out and a SansAmp for the bass.



                          The best part of this whole thing was the reaction of the drummer during their first take. He had never heard the band so clearly when playing (drums make a lot of "in your face" sound) and as they were rehearsing the drummer starts hooting and hollering ... literally going WOOOOOOO!!! and YEAAAHHH!! as he's playing.



                          The kids stop the song and he screams at the top of his lungs "I LOVE JAMHUB!!!" and the entire room erupts with laughter ... parents, me, my kids, the camera guy ... everyone. They were a great group of kids and very talented ... especially for their age.



                          Anyway, enjoy this video, here's the link: http://www.youtube.com/user/HubHed#p/u/6/r9FQp3MWnNA



                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r9FQp3MWnNA



                          PS Thanks a TON to Pearl Drums and Zildjian Cymbals for the drum kit. We didn't own one as a company and the helped us out.
                          www.JamHub.com

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            One more thing to mention, Jon, if this is considered "spam" please let me know and I'll delete it.



                            If anyone out there is going to NAMM on Sunday the "open to the public" day be sure to try any and all gear at the "Best Band U Never Heard" event. A bunch of companies got together to let you jam at NAMM. JamHubs are the center piece that allows it to happen without sonic chaos of three bands going at it all at once, and we are stoked to have so many great companies "putting us to work" at the booth. We'll do it gladly. We'll take all the help we can get Our goal is to let people play more, their goal is to make you sound great. It's a symbiotic relationship I guess.



                            Anyway, here's a shot of the booth so that you get the idea, and you can find us at Booth 410 and the Best Band booth at 342. We've got all kinds of goodies to give away as well, D'Addario strings, Hal Leonard song books, Zildjian drum sticks, and more. Come by, play some music and have a good time (oh, and walk away with some goodies). I hope to see some of you there.



                            Steve



                            www.JamHub.com

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              WOW. Those guys are amazing. Thanks for the link.
                              joint ventures

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Here's the other video I promised. For those of you who teach, or want to have a Jam Camp at your house, check this video out. Two bands, having a blast, 10 feet apart and not disturbing anyone.



                                These kids were great.



                                I don't know about you guys, but had my high school music teacher said, "Come learn The Beatles, Zeppelin and Van Halen," instead of handing me a sousaphone, I probably would have stayed after school every day.



                                Steve



                                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ood_9xCMTjM



                                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ood_9xCMTjM
                                www.JamHub.com

                                Comment



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