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  • Pie In The Sky for Independent Artists

    Congressman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) this week introduced legislation designed to make it easier for U.S. independent music labels to access the global marketplace. The legislation, known as the "Making United States Independents Competitive (MUSIC) Act," supposedly will help small labels by connecting them to new audiences and distributors. Specifically, the bill would authorize the U.S. Department of Commerce to help independent labels send their recording artists to international music trade shows. That assistance would include admission costs, support for travel, booth construction, and "touring expenses" related to the foreign shows.



    Who's gonna be first one here to fill out an application?



    The full story here.
    --
    "Today's production equipment is IT-based and cannot be operated without a passing knowledge of computing, although it seems that it can be operated without a passing knowledge of audio." - John Watkinson, Resolution Magazine, October 2006
    Drop by http://mikeriversaudio.wordpress.com now and then

  • #2
    More corporate welfare.



    NOT what I voted for.







    Having known and worked for more than a couple small labels, let me just say that my loathing for the music biz easily extends to some of the crooks, gangsters, sleazes, and airheads who have run many small labels.
    .

    music and social links | recent listening

    Comment


    • #3
      If they really wanted to give true independent music a chance -- they'd make the FCC start enforcing the anti-payola laws and regulations that are already on the books... the same laws designed to prevent the current situation, where commercial and even public license broadcasters accept various "inducements," "enhancements," "promotions," and "incentives" in order to put chosen songs into higher rotation. Maybe you can't buy a hit -- but you can buy your way onto the charts -- it's how it's done and it's an enormous barrier to true independent musicians.
      .

      music and social links | recent listening

      Comment


      • #4






        Quote Originally Posted by blue2blue
        View Post

        If they really wanted to give true independent music a chance -- they'd make the FCC start enforcing the anti-payola laws and regulations that are already on the books... the same laws designed to prevent the current situation, where commercial and even public license broadcasters accept various "inducements," "enhancements," "promotions," and "incentives" in order to put chosen songs into higher rotation. Maybe you can't buy a hit -- but you can buy your way onto the charts -- it's how it's done and it's an enormous barrier to true independent musicians.




        Radio is monopolized by Clear Channel so nothing new. I know a lot of people hate this term but again, the only way I see things changing is with more "regulation". I`m not holding my breath.

        Comment


        • #5
          The best thing to do for commercial radio is to let it die, and ignore it till it does.



          OTOH, I'm an avid listener to public radio. We're fortunate to have a few very good ones in the area.

          Comment


          • #6






            Quote Originally Posted by philbo
            View Post

            OTOH, I'm an avid listener to public radio. We're fortunate to have a few very good ones in the area.




            Absolutely.

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            • #7
              As a recording engineer and studio owner I have a good number of indie artists, interns, job shadows, etc coming through constantly. I feel like my biggest community service is trying to talk every single one of them out of working in the music business. I have a standard pitch that I rely on all the time about it's better odds playing the lottery, paraphrasing the famous Albini essay, keeping doors open rather than closing them all, etc. etc. etc. The music business is a terrible thing. The few lunatics who may actually make it- well, I trust them to ignore me, like I ignored everyone who tried to talk sense to me in the 90's. My ace up my sleeve is using myself as a cautionary tale.
              Silk City Music Factory: A Connecticut Recording Studio

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              • #8
                WTF? With everything wrong in the country (and the world) THIS is what our politicians are spending time, money, and effort on?



                I'm sure SOMEBODY would benefit from free money tossed at the indie label world. But something tells me it won't be musicians.

                Comment


                • #9






                  Quote Originally Posted by MikeRivers
                  View Post

                  Congressman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) this week introduced legislation designed to make it easier for U.S. independent music labels to access the global marketplace.




                  How about legislation to make it easier for U.S. independent labels to access the "THE U.S. MARKETPLACE."



                  And then there were three:

                  http://www.npr.org/blogs/therecord/2...l-will-buy-emi



                  Less record companies means less competition. Less competition means less variety and less quality.

                  Comment


                  • #10






                    Quote Originally Posted by blue2blue
                    View Post

                    If they really wanted to give true independent music a chance -- they'd make the FCC start enforcing the anti-payola laws and regulations that are already on the books... the same laws designed to prevent the current situation, where commercial and even public license broadcasters accept various "inducements," "enhancements," "promotions," and "incentives" in order to put chosen songs into higher rotation. Maybe you can't buy a hit -- but you can buy your way onto the charts -- it's how it's done and it's an enormous barrier to true independent musicians.




                    Payola has always existed. That's how it works. But forty years ago there were dozens of record companies competing to get their records played and those record companies were staffed by people who cared about their artists and the music they were promoting.



                    A lot of great music got played on the radio because of payola. Songs that are considered classics today were first played on the radio because of payola.



                    Today the airwaves are closed to the independents. Unless you are affiliated with one of the big three and their massive resources you're not going to get played on the radio. And the big three are now putting most of their resources into shrinking rosters of artists.

                    Comment


                    • #11






                      Quote Originally Posted by philbo
                      View Post

                      The best thing to do for commercial radio is to let it die, and ignore it till it does.



                      OTOH, I'm an avid listener to public radio. We're fortunate to have a few very good ones in the area.




                      Unfortunately we will be both dead and buried when that happens philbo, the old and new farts that run that show are still living in the land of good times and rock and roll, like the having a toke but never inhaling kind of bull**************** people.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I've run three independent record labels. One of them was picked up by Universal. I have a "bit" of experience to say the least. There was a time when independent record labels thrived. Then internet piracy happened and they collapsed almost overnight. These guys were all my friends and colleagues who barely made enough to keep the lights on and maybe staff one or two employees. All they need to do is rework SOPA/PIPA to get the piracy down closer to the level it was in the early 2000s and independent labels will coming storming back better than before.
                        Chris 'Von Pimpenstein' Carter
                        Mixer | Producer
                        Three international #1 hit radio singles
                        www.vonpimpenstein.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          You guys are reading this all wrong. It's not about independent labels, it's about independent artists (who, by necessity, are on independent labels). Who here wouldn't take money from the Government to play at a music festival somewhere else in the world? I sure would if I had any musical talent.



                          In 1970, I was part of a trio that played for six months in Japan at the World Exposition, on salary from the US State Department. And we didn't even have a record. Still don't. It had its ups and downs, but all in all kind of fun and something that I'd never do on my own nickel.
                          --
                          "Today's production equipment is IT-based and cannot be operated without a passing knowledge of computing, although it seems that it can be operated without a passing knowledge of audio." - John Watkinson, Resolution Magazine, October 2006
                          Drop by http://mikeriversaudio.wordpress.com now and then

                          Comment


                          • #14






                            Quote Originally Posted by MikeRivers
                            View Post

                            You guys are reading this all wrong. It's not about independent labels, it's about independent artists (who, by necessity, are on independent labels). Who here wouldn't take money from the Government to play at a music festival somewhere else in the world? I sure would if I had any musical talent.



                            In 1970, I was part of a trio that played for six months in Japan at the World Exposition, on salary from the US State Department. And we didn't even have a record. Still don't. It had its ups and downs, but all in all kind of fun and something that I'd never do on my own nickel.




                            From the article, the bill gives money to the labels, which then (supposedly) gives money to the artists, who then (supposedly) use it to play trade shows overseas... for no real benefit to anyone, that I can see, even if (some) of the money goes where it should.



                            Suddenly Indonesians or whoever, super-impressed by the live stage talents of American indie artists, are going to be plunking down cold, hard cash for small label CDs, when (relatively) wealthy Americans just steal the music? Please.



                            Facing a fiscal cliff situation and trillions in national debt, I really don't think the USA needs to be passing this kind of legislation.



                            From a personal perspective, F the government bureaucracy and whatever stupid forms I'd need to fill out and **************************** politicians I'd need to charm. If I have enough talent, I'll find my own way to pay for an overseas tour. Otherwise, I'll keep working on my music right here where I am, thanks.

                            Comment


                            • #15






                              Quote Originally Posted by chris carter
                              View Post

                              I've run three independent record labels. One of them was picked up by Universal. I have a "bit" of experience to say the least. There was a time when independent record labels thrived. Then internet piracy happened and they collapsed almost overnight. These guys were all my friends and colleagues who barely made enough to keep the lights on and maybe staff one or two employees. All they need to do is rework SOPA/PIPA to get the piracy down closer to the level it was in the early 2000s and independent labels will coming storming back better than before.




                              Did any of your artists have any significant radio play and if so how did you get it?



                              It's been more than twenty years since I've been associated with anybody in the record business but I used to have really good relationship with one of the record promoter guys.



                              Man, the stories he could tell. He told us a lot about the "promotional strategies" that were being employed in the late eighties and the relationships the promoters had to cultivate with the program directors. Some of them were pretty wild to say the least.



                              At that time I think there were still eight major labels and it was before the 1996 telecommunications act before Cumulus and Clear Channel and Cox and the like gobbled up most of the big stations. From what I understand the record promoting business is nothing like it was in those days and it's virtually impossible to get any airplay unless you are affiliated with one of the big three.

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