Harmony Central Forums
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

OT: Recommend acoustic foam for project studio

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse









X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • OT: Recommend acoustic foam for project studio

    What do you guys use? Is it worth paying extra for Auralex?
    My room size is about 10'x14' without any acoustic treatment.
    I've noticed when playing my keyboards the bass gets very boomy depending on the note I'm playing and when singing I get very strange frequency reverberations on some takes. Obviously I need some acoustic absorption foam, and I'm tempted by the prices of some discount ebay sellers like 8 bass traps for $35, etc. Is it safe to go this route? Does it matter what kind of glue I use? Will the glue ruin my white painted walls?

  • #2
    For bass troubles and room modes I'd rather get actual traps, not foam.
    "Part of an instrument is what it can do, and part of it is what you do to it" - Suzanne Ciani, 197x.
    Synthesizer Programming Megathread - add your tips & tricks or ask how to recreate sounds!

    Comment


    • #3
      This 'foam' is not the actual traps?

      http://cgi.ebay.com/Dark-Charcoal-Acoustic-Foam-Bass-Absorbers-Traps-8pk_W0QQitemZ260571127645QQ

      Comment


      • #4
        Foam does not retain the lower frequencies which are the ones that cause the most trouble; it can actually make the problem worse by absorbing the highs and mids while leaving the lows resounding freely in your room.

        There's a wealth of information here, and the search function there works, too, unlike the one here at HC...
        http://www.reverbnation.com/christianschulze

        Comment


        • #5
          get some owens corning 703 and make something like this. This is 1x4, and muslin

          Instruments

          Guitars : 2006 Mcpherson 4.5xp, 1974 Mossman greatplains (mint with agony of defeat fix), 2 custom (Wavelength guitars) built electric guitars with original Q-tuner pickups.

          Keyboard gear: S90es, Andromeda, Jomox 888, TR-909, Moog Voyager Select, x0xb0x, sp-555

          Comment


          • #6
            Foam does not retain the lower frequencies which are the ones that cause the most trouble; it can actually make the problem worse by absorbing the highs and mids while leaving the lows resounding freely in your room.

            Wow, posts like that make me nervous! So companies that are selling foam like Auralex, are they selling a lie? It doesn't work?
            I just want a (relatively) simple solution that will help curb some of my frequency problems. I don't need perfection. I have gotten by with nothing until now. But from the sounds of it, it almost seems like I'd be better off doing nothing? What about one of these portable vocal booths? http://www.editorskeys.com/portable-vocal-booth-home-version-soundbooth.html

            Any other suggestions?

            Comment


            • #7
              Here's another popular forum on the subject.

              This guy actually launched a fraud lawsuit against companies making cheap foam bass traps at some point.

              I don't know if this applies to all types of foam in the market (apparently it does), but foam just can't retain the lower bass waves and they bounce right back.
              http://www.reverbnation.com/christianschulze

              Comment


              • RamyRomio
                RamyRomio commented
                Editing a comment

                i just highly Recommend acoustic foam for studio project and teater here


              • RamyRomio
                RamyRomio commented
                Editing a comment

                i just highly Recommend acoustic foam for project studio and theater soundcontrolservices.co.uk

                here


            • #8
              On the cheap, one can use the large panals of dense foam sound insulation that Home Depot carries. Perhaps covered with some fabric of whatever choice. Qtuners suggestions is also very good for budget method. For pro level I find this the best Ive been around, Available in various sizes and packages http://www.audioadvisor.com/prodinfo.asp?number=MTAP2440%20%204PKBUR
              Life for its own carnal pleasure.Synths: Novation KS4 & Maudio Venom. Guitar: BC Rich It Warlock.. Bass: BC Rich Warlock. Sight: Aerial lasers by Omnisistem & Chauvet,. Geometric lasers by Extreme.

              Comment


              • #9
                Wow, posts like that make me nervous! So companies that are selling foam like Auralex, are they selling a lie? It doesn't work?


                There's no lie involved. Acoustic foam works great. You just have to be careful and use it only for its intended purpose. High frequency sounds are easily absorbed by lightweight material such as acoustic foam.

                If you want to absorb low frequencies, then you'll need something much, much more massive. Heavy vinyl sheeting or even lead sheeting is sometimes used in industrial applications. I'm not recommending that to you; it's just an example to show that regular acoustic foam isn't a magic cure-all for the entire frequency spectrum.

                Another way of killing low frequencies is to 'trap' the sound waves and cause them to cancel themselves out. The trap needs to be constructed and placed according to specific rules which I know nothing about. But there's a lot of information out there if you feel like digging for it.

                Check out the web site for Sound On Sound (SOS) Magazine. Every month they do a makeover of a home studio. They've demonstrated how to build bass traps using very inexpensive materials.
                Prophet 08 / Odyssey / Juno-60 / CS-30 / Korg 01W / FS1R / TR-606 / RY30 / Ensoniq DP4+ /// Sonar

                Comment


                • #10
                  The panels you can hang from the wall sound like a nice solution. Plus avoiding the glue will make my gf quite happy. Can I be sure these will help tame my frequency problems? There are a few ebay sellers:
                  http://cgi.ebay.com/ATS-Acoustic-Panels-for-Home-Theater-or-Sound-Studio_W0QQitemZ220576810453QQ
                  and
                  http://cgi.ebay.com/Acoustic-Sound-Treatment-6-Panels-ASCPRO_W0QQitemZ130373309133QQ

                  Plus the audiophile link above. Anyone have experience with these guys? Do these also work for bass frequencies?

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Bass traps for the whole room, not a simple thing. Some people report that a fabric covered couch, or a bed if its a bedroom, do a good job absorbing the bass. Find someone with 'golden ears', that does not sell acoustic products and services, and get their opinion. See if a local sound company will rent you some traps to try out.

                    Just a thought, but I've seen some acoustic foam items that fit on a mic stand, and curve around the microphone, controlling the room sound by semi-isolating the mic. It's an interesting idea.

                    The general idea with foam is to reduce and break up reflections, so more of the direct sound is heard. If you do decide to tweak the sound of the room in general, the best deal going is Markertek.com, a vendor of video production supplies. Their foam is available in sheets, tiles, and traps that go in room corners. The difference from more expensive foam appears to be the fire rating. Don't use too much and deaden the room. Good luck!

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Foam and bass traps treat different issues. Both can be useful - or harmful. It depends on the acoustics of the room.

                      Auralex makes some good products...as well as some so-so ones.
                      Best Regards, James
                      --
                      I have cast fire upon the world and I am guarding it until it blazes.

                      My Newest CD "Stealing The Sun": http://carbon111.bandcamp.com/

                      Carbon111 Website: http://www.carbon111.com

                      Carbon111 Blog: http://carbon111.blogspot.com

                      Comment



                      Working...
                      X