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  • Do you know how easy it would be to swipe my sound module and then convert those pathces into reason refills. Reason has a sampler called the NN-XT that allows you to map wav files across the keys (whether it transposes one wave file or you map individual waves for each note to each of the keys) and you can also layer samples so that a different sample will be played if the same key is pressed at different velocities. Does the X2 create seperate wav files for each note in a patch that can be loaded into an external sampler?

    Thanks for your help.

    Comment


    • See my reply two posts above regarding the question of transferring samples to an MPC. The X2 doesn't seem to have any way to export standard wav files.

      However, you CAN open the samples in an editor and save as WAV or AIFF or whatever you want. But of course, these are just raw files with loop points; they won't be subject to the filtering and such that the X2 offers.

      So the bottom line is this is how you'd do it:

      1. Swipe the synth.
      2. Open each sample in an exteranl editor and save as WAV.
      3. Load in the NN-XT and apply your various splits, layers, processing, etc.
      Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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      • Originally posted by Anderton
        The X2 doesn't seem to have any way to export standard wav files.


        To export a sample, R-Click in on a sample in the left pane. Select Export.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by PubeDread
          To export a sample, R-Click in on a sample in the left pane. Select Export.

          ***Another option you have for any output of [ASAP] Auto-Sampling And Placement is to choose the "to files" option in the save section. This is the alternative to sending the chopped files back "to sampler" for placement. Some cool ways to use this...
          -Strip silence from Audio Sampling CD tracks and generate seperated/named files rapidly.
          -Take stuff you recorded in your DAW or Acapella tracks and split so you can load into any sampler for more flexibilty when doing remixes.
          -Chopping up long contiguous dialog or sound effects recordings.

          Craig, thanks very much for such a thorough review. We really appreciate your support. Will be checking in from time to time and will try and answer any questions directed our way.

          Best Regards,
          ICHi
          E-MU Systems

          Comment


          • <<-Strip silence from Audio Sampling CD tracks and generate seperated/named files rapidly. >>

            That is brilliant!! Thanks for chiming in, I know the X2 is very, very deep and I can't catch everything. Any hints, tips, and comments will be most appreciated.

            Also, thanks to PubeDread for the export tip. Much easier than opening in a waveform editor and saving.

            Now, if we could just have a "render with processing and save as WAV" file...the X2 is such a sound design monster, a command like this would make it very easy to create sound libraries.
            Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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            • Craig

              I'm wondering about upgrading from Emulator X to X2, but just for one specific reason: I want a VST instrument with the sound and response of an Emu Proformance/1 piano module, and I wonder whether SynthSwipe could help.

              Together, Chicken Systems 'Free' and Emulator-X's sample-import features have given my Emulator-X access to my eight old Emu EIIIx CD-ROMs: Vol 1 (Emulator Standards) to Vol 8 (Vintage). Using Bank 5 in Volume 7 (Emu Classics) I've made faithful reproductions of old sequences that used to play the Proteus/2. (I played back a sequence simultaneously on a Proteus/2 and on Emulator-X (equivalent instruments), and made "A/B" comparisons whilst adjusting levels in Emulator-X.)

              So, it seems my Emulator-X can stand in for my EIIIXP and my Proteus/2. But it can't (yet, anyway) simulate my Proformance/1. No piano sound on these Emu CD-ROMs is a good match with the Proformance/1. The nearest match is one of the Bosendorfers - very similar in part of the keyboard range. I don't know whether a closer match would be possible by cobbling together the close-matching samples from that Bosendorfer with samples from one of the others, but I suspect not.

              SynthSwipe to the rescue?

              Or not?

              Ought it to be feasible to use it to get Emulator-X2 to simulate a Proformance/1? What would I do - break the keyboard range into sections and sample each section, setting a note length covering the full decay of the longest note in the range? Then set envelope release times to deal with playing shorter notes? And how fill in the gaps between the different velocity levels? - Or does the software deal with that?

              Is the record level the same throughout the automatic sampling? - If so, I suppose the low-velocity samples woud be be inherrently noisier?

              Would it be very time-consuming to construct a usable fake Proformance/1 this way?

              Of course, the best solution would be to persuate Emu to sell a "real imitation" ("real" because it used the original samples, etc) of the Proformance/1 - whether for loading into the Emulator or as a purely-Proformance/1 VST instrument.

              Comment


              • Ought it to be feasible to use it to get Emulator-X2 to simulate a Proformance/1? What would I do - break the keyboard range into sections and sample each section, setting a note length covering the full decay of the longest note in the range?
                ***There are 2 approaches.
                1) Sample the raw waveforms(by undoing all the programming), reloop and reprogram with envelopes etc.
                2) Sample the synth as is and just make it a streaming copy.

                Then set envelope release times to deal with playing shorter notes?
                ***Adding ENV's to a streaming copy is kind of redundant since you've already recorded it's dynamic response. For the most control, use approach 1. It's more work but you'll be able to manipulate the sample set pretty much as you wish.

                And how fill in the gaps between the different velocity levels?
                ***It will setup velocity layer switches. You can tune these of course after the fact.

                Or does the software deal with that?
                ***You will need to experiment a few times but SynthSwipe will sample all the levels you want.

                Is the record level the same throughout the automatic sampling? - If so, I suppose the low-velocity samples woud be be inherrently noisier?
                ***Depending on the amount of layers you choose the MIDI device will be triggered and recorded at x velocity and thus the volume would be relative to the velocity. You can choose to normalize if you want, and yes the quiet samples will have more noise if you did this.

                Would it be very time-consuming to construct a usable fake Proformance/1 this way?
                ***Approach 1 is definitely more work than 2 but both can deliver very good results. Approach 1 is very flexible and is probably very small and resource efficient, 2 is brute force so it will be a very big sample set.

                Of course, the best solution would be to persuate Emu to sell a "real imitation" ("real" because it used the original samples, etc) of the Proformance/1 - whether for loading into the Emulator or as a purely-Proformance/1 VST instrument.
                ***The Stereo Grand in the Proteus Composer EXB(AKA PROTEUS 2000) is pretty much the Proformance piano. It's been tweaked, but we think for the better. This is probably the easiest way to start if you are trying to emulate the Proformance/1.

                Best,
                ICHi
                E-MU Systems

                Comment


                • "Approach 1" is what I'm doing with my Peavey DPM3 samples. It is more work, but far more flexible. The filters in the X2 are close enough to the Peavey I can get the sounds I need; what makes the DPM3 distinctive is how it transposes sounds, and the X2 captures that essence as part of the waveform.
                  Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                  Subscribe, like, and share the links!

                  Comment


                  • Hi Ichi,

                    per craig's request:

                    "Now, if we could just have a "render with processing and save as WAV" file"

                    Is this possible yet? If I run a sample through the x2's effects, whether it be the slicer or the sp12ulator, can I export through the x2, or do I first need to render as a wav in the host?

                    Thanks
                    http://www.myspace.com/dahkter

                    Comment


                    • Hi Craig, I’m glad your doing such a thorough review of the X2.

                      I’m a Mac guy and I’m considering getting a PC just for the X2 or will
                      an dual core intel Mac be just as good?

                      Looking forward to your Twistaloops and Transform multiply review.

                      ICHi, since this sampler is so complex, any chance of a DVD being made
                      showing creative uses and EXAMPLES?

                      Thanks to you both.

                      Comment


                      • <<I’m a Mac guy and I’m considering getting a PC just for the X2 or will a dual core intel Mac be just as good?>>

                        I don't have an Intel Mac, just a dual G5...so I can't really test this. I can't imagine someone from E-Mu not testing this, however...especially because they have a USB interface that the Intel Macs should get along with.

                        E-Mu is monitoring this thread, I think it's very likely you'll get an answer.
                        Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                        Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                        • Before moving on to additional features like TwistaLoop, I’d like to wrap up the sample/program creation end of things.

                          As you may recall, I’d been using SynthSwipe to grab a bunch of waveforms from my DPM3. At this point, I’ve “swiped” 11 complete multi-sampled sets of waves. When I did, I knew I’d be doing pretty much single-cycle loops, so I “swiped” with the loop points enclosing the last eighth of the sample.

                          When it’s time to actually edit samples, you look under the Samples folder in the browser tree to find the sample(s) you want to edit. I would find it more convenient if you could open up a Preset to expose the samples from there; I really can’t think of any downside to doing things this way, unless there’s some kind of problem that could occur if multiple programs point to the same samples, and you can’t include some kind of “alias” to the point to the sample you want.

                          Click on the attachment to see what a raw sample looks like.. On the left, in the sample browser, you can see a series of waves labeled “DPM DGW5 [key name].” There are 13 samples for this multi-sampled instrument. On the right, you can see the waveform; I sampled one second’s worth of audio at 44.1kHz, so you can see there are 44,100 samples, with loops around the last eighth of the sample. Let’s get to work and trim this into something that a) doesn’t take up as much memory, and b) has seamless looping.
                          Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                          Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                          • The first thing I did was move the loop points arbitrarily to around 3,500 and 5,000 samples. I figured that would be more than enough to cover a waveform, but would cut the memory requirements by about 90%.

                            Then, I hit the Autocorrelate button. This analyzes the loop, and moves the start point to a portion of the wave that most closely resembles the end point. Sometimes it’s a direct hit, sometimes a miss. If it misses, you move the end point and try again. It often seemed to be perfect except for being off by one sample. In this case, there’s a numerical field for the loop start, end, and length that you can “nudge” one sample at a time (or type in a value, if you’re so inclined). Most of the time, just nudging the start one sample later produced a perfect loop.

                            Click on the attachment to see the loop points selected by auto-correlation. It’s pretty impressive; this was one of those “hit the bulls-eye immediately” acts of correlation. In this screen shot I also clicked on the “Select Loop” view, which highlights the loop and sizes it to take up most of the waveform view.

                            The final step (other than saving, of course!) was selecting the waveform just a little past the end of loop, and selecting Truncate to cut off the excess amount of signal. Done – one sample trimmed and ready to go.
                            Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                            Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                            • That left me with 12 more samples to do. Time for an experiment: How fast could I loop and trim 12 samples? So, right now it’s 9:38 PM…let’s see what happens.

                              9:45 PM…12 samples looped, trimmed, and saved: Not bad at all, and that’s taking my time and making sure the loops were good before truncating. The higher the note frequency, the more likely that I had to nudge the sample start one sample later to make it all work out okay.

                              Of course, these are just the raw multisamples; I haven’t added any filtering, LFO, effects, etc. That’s a whole other thing.

                              (By the way, in case some of you have noticed that the time on these postings doesn’t really correlate with real time, here’s why: I’m writing this and posting on my Mac, while doing the X2 work on my Windows XP machine. I save the screen shots to a USB drive, and wait until I have a batch of at least two I three before I transfer them over to the Mac and actually do the posting. Yeah, I know, I should network the two…maybe next month LOL.)
                              Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                              Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                              • The toughest waveforms to loop were the SPEC waveforms, which are strange, looped digital sounds. Here, there was no chance of creating a single cycle, because that would destroy the sound's essential character.

                                I decided the best strategy was to find the original loop points as closely as possible, then use the Loop Processing options to help smooth things out. Click on the attachment to see the Loop Processing dialog box. This is the box that enables crossfade looping.

                                For those who need to get up to speed on crossfade looping, the basic idea is that a little bit of the signal prior to the loop start is crossfaded in just prior to the loop end, and a little bit of the signal just past the loop end is crossfaded in just past the loop start. That way, there’s a smoother transition when the loop end jumps back to the loop start.

                                The Loop Processing dialog box may not seem very deep, but there’s enough to create seamless crossfade loops. The “Compress Loop” option evens out levels throughout the loop, which promotes better looping as it minimizes big volume differences between the loop start and loop end. “Truncate After Loop” is something I never check; maybe I’m just hyper-cautious, but I always like to leave some signal after the loop just in case I need to retweak the loop someday.

                                Crossfade lets you specify a length in samples, but conveniently, it won’t let you specify a range longer than the maximum range that can be crossfaded (i.e., you can’t mix in signal before the start of the sample or after the end of the sample). You can also specify a linear or equal power crossfade. I just try both, undo, and use whichever one sounds better.

                                Getting a good crossfade is much more difficult than getting a good single-cycle loop with a constant waveform, but it wasn’t too hard to whip the waveforms into shape. I also learned to always try the Autocorrelate button first: With a surprisingly high percentage of loops lightning would strike, and I’d get a perfect loop without even having to crossfade. But I'd add a 20 ms crossfade or so, just in case
                                Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                                Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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