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  • #46
    Indeed it is - and that's what I planned to cover after the Multiband Dynamics!
    Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

    Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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    • #47
      Does Live 8 work with Vista-64 bit?
      Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

      Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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      • #48
        Craig,

        I found this page:

        http://www.ableton.com/pages/faq/vista

        they are saying that it may work, but they recommend vista 32bit...

        maybe Dennis would give us more details....

        Thanks

        Originally Posted by VÃ****ctor


        ..Si te separas, espero que no, avÃ****same podÃ****amos vivir juntos, eso si, sin mariconeo...









        Originally Posted by artiem


        The truest indicator of one's character is how he acts when there are no consequences.




        SPAM: FT/FS

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        • #49
          Hi folks,

          Basically, I can only pass on the official party line in re: Vista.

          It is likely that everything will work fine under 64-bit versions. But we haven't tested this extensively and we don't officially support it.

          We do officially support 32-bit versions of Vista.

          Best,
          Dennis DeSantisHead of Documentation, Abletonwww.ableton.com

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          • #50
            I work with ableton 8 in vista 64bit, for a month and a half, never had problems

            in fact, I didn't experience any problems on any other software (pro tools 8 LE and several plugins)...

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            • #51
              As we continue our odyssey through the new effects...

              I was at GearFest over the weekend, and saw Huston Singleterry from Ableton do a Live workshop. There's all kinds of cool stuff hidden in Live 8's nooks and crannies, and of course, it's our job here to uncover it! All in all it was very inspiring.

              Before getting into the multiband dynamics, I keep being impressed by just how good the effects are in Ableton. Some people don't take them seriously because they don't have 3D GUIs and look like vintage gear, but the quality is there...in particular, the Reverb. While not an addition to Live 8 (I think it got added with Live 7), it sounds really, really good.

              If you saw the July issue of EQ Magazine, there's a "Power App Alley" on using Ableton's Multiband Dynamics to "unsquash" an overcompressed song. Click here to see the article. (By the way, the thumbnails don't currently open into the full-size image, but I'm told that will be fixed by tomorrow morning.) Before proceeding, I suggest checking it out because it will give you an idea of a practical application that's not normally done with multiband dynamics processors.
              Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

              Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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              • #52
                Refer to the first attached image for an overall screen shot. We're dealing with a three-band unit, although if you disable the upper and lower bands, you end up with a traditional single band compressor.

                One feature that makes the Multiband Dynamics interesting - and also allows for the "de-squashing" trick described in the previous post - is that there are both "below" and "above" thresholds. However, if you're used to traditional multiband dynamics processors, you may find it difficult to wrap your head around what's happening (I did). Depending on how you set up the controls, you can get four different types of dynamics processing, as shown in the second attached image:

                Downward compression. This is the standard way to compress, where loud signals are pushed down in level to reduce dynamic range.
                Upward compression. Here, softer signals are pushed upward; the end result is still reduced dynamic range.
                Downward expansion. This is the usual expansion mode that used to reduce noise, where soft signals are made software.
                Upward expansion. This expands peaks above the threshold, according to the ratio control.

                For example, if the Above threshold is set to -10 and the ratio is greater than 1:1 (e.g., 1.5), then the peaks above that threshold will be expanded upward. Conversely, if the ratio is smaller than 1:1 (e.g., 1:4), then the peaks above the threshold will be compressed downward.

                Another example: If the Below threshold is set to -10 and the ratio is greater than 1:1 (e.g., 1.5), then the peaks below that threshold will be expanded downward. Conversely, if the ratio is smaller than 1:1 (e.g., 1:4), then the peaks below the threshold will be compressed upward.

                See? I told you it would take a while to wrap your head around it...

                In the third attached image, the middle band is soloed. The Below threshold (highlighted in red for clarity) applies upward compression to a drum loop signal, thus bringing up low-level sounds and room noise. The Above threshold (highlighted in blue for clarity) has upward expansion applied, so that peaks become louder and "jump out" of the mix.
                Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                • #53
                  Before getting into the audio examples, let's go over the rest of the Multiband Dynamics options.

                  You can set a Crossover point for the high and low bands, as well as Activate/Deactivate and Solo each band. Each band has an Input control, which as you saw in the "de-squash" example, is essential if you want to open up more headroom for expanding peaks. Each band also has an Output control, so if you don't apply any compression or expansion, you can use the output controls to change the level of each frequency band - essentially turning the Multiband Dynamics processor into a type of EQ.

                  The T, B, and A buttons select different parameters fields for each band for Time (you can set Attack and Release), Below threshold and ratio, and Above threshold and Ratio. You can also change these graphically by dragging on the Above and Below blocks, then dragging up or down to change the ratio. If you're into a more intuitive approach and just want to listen, the drag approach is ideal. If you've been using dynamics control for a while and already know ballpark threshold and ratio amounts for particular signals, you might prefer clicking and dragging in the numerical fields to set values.

                  You can choose Soft Knee or Hard Knee curves (this is global for all bands), and RMS or Peak response. There's an overall Master Output control as well as the Output controls for each band, a Time control that scales all Attack and Release settings if you want to shorten or lengthen the values as a group, and finally, a very cool control: Amount, which sounds like it scales the Ratio settings although I'm not totally sure that's all that's happening.

                  Overall, this is an exceptionally powerful dynamics processor once you get the hang of it. The metering is helpful, as it displays both the incoming level (the narrow yellow bands) and the output level (the VU meter-like orange bands). Being able to "pull" drums out of a loop to make them more percussive, or apply standard compression techniques to increase average levels, gives tremendous latitude over how you process the signal.
                  Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                  Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                  • #54
                    Here's a good use of the Multiband Dynamics module - winning a victory in the loudness wars

                    The first attached image shows the multiband dynamics processor in action. Note that the orange output meters have peaks that exceed the yellow input level bands.

                    The second attached image shows the two files compared in Wavelab. As you can see, the peaks in the "Desquashed" versions are much peakier than the super-compressed original version.

                    As to audio examples, the first audio example is the original, compressed file. The second audio example is the desquashed version with the restored peaks.

                    Granted, the desquashed version sounds a lot less dramatic when played back at the same volume setting as the original version - that's why people squash the crap out of the dynamic range! But try this: Turn the volume up when you listen to the desquashed version, and you'll hear a restortion of dynamics that's pretty cool compared to the original.

                    I made the difference between the two substantial so that the difference would be obvious, but of course, you can apply the "de-squashing" more subtly - for example, restoring dynamics to an overly-compressed drum loop.
                    Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                    Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                    • #55
                      Just got this in my email inbox today:

                      Summer 2009 is Ableton's Summer of Sampler. We're giving away a special Sampler package with new sounds, lessons, presets, Instrument Racks and Construction Kits: Samplification.

                      Samplification includes:

                      * 19 Construction Kits
                      * 3 Live Sets with drum clips
                      * 97 new Instrument Racks
                      * Sampler tutorials
                      * New samples from Puremagnetik
                      * Samples from Cycling '74
                      * Selected sounds from SoundObjects Lite by SonArte

                      Download Samplification for free:

                      http://ableton.com/nl318-samplification

                      Samplification is a Live Pack. Download size is around 450 MB (uncompressed). Installation size is about 950 MB.

                      Happy sampling this summer,

                      The Ableton team


                      I'm downloading it right now...
                      Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                      Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                      • #56
                        I thoguht I'd try using the Multiband Dynamics effect to mess with a standard acoustic drum loop, which you'll hear in the first audio example (from the Discrete Drums library).

                        Now check out the second audio example, which uses the settings shown in the attached image. We've done quite a lot to the poor drums...

                        The high band for percussion is set for extreme upward expansion, making the various percussive sounds extremely percussive. The mid band downward compresses the snare (you can make out the Below block toward the left of the mid band), and the low band uses upward expansion to bring out the kick drum peaks, while removing some of the ambience to give more of an "old school" sound.

                        Time to move on to the vocoder and limiter...unless, of course, you have any questions.
                        Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                        Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                        • #57
                          Back to Pro Reviews! NAMM is over, the videos are edited, and the NAMM edition of the Harmony Central Confidential newsletter is put to bed and will ship in a few days. So, no more show stuff until AES...back to music.

                          Before going to the new vocoder, let's take a quick look at the limiter. This is something Live has needed for a while for those instances where you want to squash a signal, reduce its dynamic range when playing live, or catch transients on instruments in individual channels.

                          Referring to the attached image (the Limiter is the module to the right), the controls are fairly standard. Gain sets how much signal level hits the limiter, so the more gain, the more of the signal gets limited...as shown on the Gain Reduction meter (not labeled) toward the right, with the orange bar indicating the amount of gain reduction at that instant. Lookahead trades off a little bit of delay through the plug-in to "look ahead" and make sure that any transients are caught as they happen, not slightly after (choices for Lookahead are 1.5, 3. and 6 ms).

                          Release sets the time for the dynamics to return to normal after being limited, Stereo links the two channels to preserve stereo image (although clicking on it chooses L/R, which limits each channel independently), and Ceiling sets an upper limit on the signal - typically, you'd set this just below 0 if you wanted the maximum amount of output level short of distortion.

                          But of course, an example audio tells all. The first audio example is of a loop with no limiting; the peaks hit 0dB. In the second audio example, the peaks also hit 0dB, but this time, a lot of limiting has been applied to raise the average level - as you'll hear, it has a much higher perceived volume level.

                          The irony of it all, of course, is that Live now has the limiting tools to get hugely squashed sounds if that's what you want, but with the multiband dynamics, you can "undo" some of the negative effects of excessive compression...so you're pretty much covered either way!
                          Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                          Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                          • #58
                            Next up: The Vocoder. In case you're not clear on what a vocoder does, here's the basic concept.

                            A vocoder is a signal processor with two inputs and one output. One input analyzes a signal (the modulator) for the amount of energy that exists at any given moment in various filter bands (from 4 to hundreds, depending on the vocoder; Live's does from 4 to 40).

                            The second input is the carrier. It passes though a similar series of filter bands, except that each one is controlled by the analysis data from the modulator. For example, if a kick drum is the modulator, the carrier's low frequencies will be let through the filter corresponding filters. This is how the sound of one signal gets impressed upon the other.

                            For speech, the voice is the modulator, and something like noise, synthesizer, power chords, whatever provide the carrier. As you talk, the frequencies that make up speech are impressed on the carrier.

                            I'm a huge fan of vocoders, but not really for their intended purpose: I like to modulate something like a synth pad with drums, rather than make the synth pad "talk." There are a few exceptions with vocals - like using noise to simulate crowd sounds - but doing unusual combinations of modulator and carrier can create novel, interesting effects.

                            So, as we look over the vocoder, let's evaluate it not just as a standard vocoder, but how well it can do these other types of "cross-synthesis" effects.
                            Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                            Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                            • #59
                              When you want to use the Vocoder, start off with the track you want to use as the modulator, and insert the Vocoder as you would any other plug-in. The first attached image shows the setup used in this example: The Modulator track (1) has a drum loop, while track (2), the Carrier, has a sustained power chord loop (the tracks are outlined in red). Note that in addition to the Vocoder, there's also a Simple Delay added to process the vocoder sound.

                              We have choices of carriers for the vocoder (circled in green), including internal noise, the modulator (so the modulator signal feeds both the modulator and carrier ins), or pitch tracking, when the carrier is a monophonic oscillator that tracks the modulator signal's pitch (well, more or less - we'll get into that later). What's cool is that you can choose any audio track, pre or post FX; this makes it easy in this case to choose Track 2 with the carrier. If you want to use multiple tracks for modulation, no problem: Just send them to a Send, and use that as the carrier.

                              The Vocoder has a lot of options you can use to tweak the sound, but before getting into that, check out the attached audio example. It's the result of using the drum loop to modify the power chord, and while a fairly basic vocoder application, it's still pretty cool
                              Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                              Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                              • #60
                                As mentioned previousoy, Live's Vocoder lets you specify the number of bands, from 4 to 40. More bands gives a sort of increased "resolution" to the sound.

                                The first attached image shows four bands in action, while the second attached image shows what happens with 40 bands selected.

                                And of course, you want audio examples! The first audio example is the sound of a drum loop modulating the internal noise source, which is being used as a carrier, using 4 bands. The second audio example uses 20 bands, and the third audio example uses the 40-band option.

                                As the number of bands increases, you can hear much more clearly how individual drum sounds are modulating the noise. However, this doesn't automatically mean "more bands = more good." The sound of the 4-band option, for example, recalls Kraftwerk's Trans-Europe Express drum sound, which is pretty cool.

                                Also note that the difference between 20 bands and 40 bands is far more subtle than the difference between 4 bands and 20 bands.
                                Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                                Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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