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Royer Labs recently launched an ongoing series of microphone seminars designed to provide aspiring audio engineers with a comprehensive view of the microphone, including its historical significance, the types of microphones that exist, applications, and a factory tour. Geared toward college level students, the new program is the result of surging interest in all aspects of audio production. Rick Perrotta, President of Royer Labs, commented on the company's new seminar program. "Over the years, we've had requests from numerous colleges and educational programs to open our doors and offer audio production students a look at the microphone and all that this essential recording tool encompasses," said Perrotta. "In addition to hearing music recordings, we encounter a proliferation of audio for video in our everyday lives and this has opened the floodgates in terms of interest in audio production. By getting a first-hand look at the microphone and better understanding its historical significance, its evolving role in analog and digital recording, how a microphone functions, and how these tools are manufactured, students gain a much clearer understanding of the work and considerations that go into any quality recording." The Royer Labs microphone seminar is a half day program. Topics include a historical perspective of microphone development from the earliest days through to today, as well as a look at how various microphones work within analog and digital systems and how ribbon microphones, in particular, fit into these environments. Students also learn how the engineering and product development process works — from design focus group concept through solidworks engineering, prototyping, and the creation of production samples and finished goods. Further, the seminar involves a critical listening session. As part of the factory tour, students engage in a question and answer session with Royer's design and engineering team, including David Royer, chief engineer of Royer Labs microphones. The meeting with David Royer is particularly appealing to the students, as Perrotta explained. "We conduct a one-on-one meeting with David for a round table question and answer session," notes Perrotta, "and many students find this aspect of the seminar to be really interesting, as it opens their eyes to a real-world example of flourishing in the face of adversity. David was born autistic and, as a child, didn't speak until he was 5 years old. As he matured, he developed an aptitude for electrical engineering and used this skill to further his involvement with music. He began building microphones and other musical equipment as a means of translating his own musical experiences in a meaningful way. Royer Labs carries his name so that his legacy as a manufacturer of quality microphones would never be lost." In addition to a comprehensive look into the world of microphones and their manufacturing process, students complete their visit to Royer Labs with a group photo, Royer T-shirts, CDs, product literature, and other materials. Snacks and drinks are also provided. Rick Perrotta commented on the value of the Royer microphone seminars. "These seminars have numerous benefits," explained Perrotta. "It's extremely gratifying to see the reaction of the students as they're exposed to the myriad of considerations that go into making a quality microphone. Since many of these students will, in the not-too-distant future, be directly involved in various facets of the audio business, I believe it's important to help them recognize the many aspects of our industry that present opportunity — including design, manufacturing, and sales. Over the years, Royer Labs has offered internships, and this is yet another opportunity for students to get involved with Royer Labs. And for those students who go into the production side of the business, we like to think that their positive experience with us will lead to additional business as they venture out on their own. Looked at from all angles, I believe everyone wins." Dr. Nicolas Deuson, Lecturer in Performing Arts at the California State University Channel Islands, located in Camarillo, CA, recently brought his students to Royer Labs for the microphone seminar. Dr. Deuson offered his assessment of the program, "I felt the seminar clearly instantiated many of the concepts we discussed in class, in that the students were able to view aspects of the design and construction of such high quality microphones. The staff at Royer Labs' professionalism, thoughtfulness, and thoroughness was second to none. It was a very enjoyable, informative session." Royer Labs offers monthly seminars to interested universities, colleges, and other learning institutions from April through August annually. Interested parties should contact Royer Labs.
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