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gig-fx inc. is pleased to announce that the SubWah, a bass version of the popular MegaWah, is now available for sale. The new SubWah captures the signature wide-sweep range and funky low end of the Megawah, but has tailored the frequency ranges for bass guitar. The SubWah was developed with cooperation from top professional bass players in Boston, Nashville and LA, including Bootsy Collins. The all-analog pedal features four settings: a classic wah sound, a very deep bass 'Sub' wah, a funky envelope wah with adjustable trigger sensitivity, and an auto-wah with adjustable rate. Special care was taken to ensure preservation of bass frequencies, including five / six string low B response and at the same time to maximize 'quack' and 'ping'. Many months were spent with professional players perfecting the sweep to optimize the effect and still retain bass response. The SubWah uses optical switching and is noiselessly by-passed when the pedal is all the way back and switches on noiselessly when the pedal is pressed forward. The SubWah features a user-adjustable off-delay so that the effect turns off exactly when the musician wants it to. The pedal features the new 'better than true by-pass'™ circuitry proven to be superior to a true by-pass in terms of preserving the instrument's tone and harmonics through instrument cables. gig-fx has published test results on their web site which support that claim: http://www.gig-fx.com/products/True_Bypass_Measurement_Full_Article.pdf The SubWah follows the popular Megawah legend, which is currently being used by an impressive list of creative guitarists such as Peter Frampton, Nick McCabe (The Verve), Brett Tuggle (Fleetwood Mac), Robin Finck (NIN), Johnny Hiland, and more; bass players have been requesting a bass version. For a video of Thee Ram jammin on the SubWah with the pedal: http://www.gig-fx.com/products/Subwah/SubWah.htm
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