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  • #91
    What? Does no-one care about this stuff anymore? Don't let this thread get buried!

    Forever,




    Kim.
    The Composition Thread is sticky!
    There is no heavier burden than a great potential.- Unknown source

    Comment


    • #92
      Ladies and gentlemen, we are approaching some special cases of adding and removing notes for excitment and expectation. Please fasten your seatbelts and remain calm.

      Tonight I'd just like to append to last night's post by discussing two particular special cases of removing notes (for expectation) and adding notes (for excitement). These special cases are Moving notes back and Moving notes forward.

      As you may have gathered from last night's megapost, adding or removing notes from a pattern not only dynamically changes the tension and stress positions in the pattern... adding or removing notes can also change the density of the pattern. In many cases, this is desirable because alterning the density can contribute to a general change of intensity that is suitable for the part.

      However, interesting effects can be created by changing the tension points without changing the density. If we look at creating expectation, an alternative to removing notes could be to move notes back. This is very similar "pushing back" - mentioned in my (more general) discussion of expectation. The difference here is that this time we are applying the principals to individual notes, rather than larger sections.

      Similarly, if we want to create excitement in a drum pattern, an alternative to adding notes could be to move existing notes forward. Again, this is similar to "pushing forward", only applied to individual notes rather than whole sections. I won't discuss this in much more detail, as the principals are very much the same.

      Listening to Tori Amos is making me tired, so I think I'll call it here.

      I will say one thing more before I sign off though:

      This thread is sinking like a stone. My impression is that people enjoy reading this, but choose not to contribute much. That's fine... but when I'm the only one who posts here in two days, I start to wonder whether there's anyone actually still here. This thread dropped off the bottom of the list earlier today. Now, I'd really like for this to stay near the top so more people can see it and (hopefully) learn from it. To keep this thread alive though, I'd like your help. Some ideas:


        Forever,




        Kim.
      The Composition Thread is sticky!
      There is no heavier burden than a great potential.- Unknown source

      Comment


      • #93
        Hey Jeez, I'm still reading it, I just feel like it's your show and I haven't really thought of anything to contribute. You yelled at me the last time I just said "Hey, good work" so I've been keeping my mouth shut, too.

        Kiru
        "Don't sell your life! Do whatever you really want to do. You must act as the master of your life, and then become free. No matter how difficult it is, no matter how unsuccessful it might seem, do whatever you want!"
        -- Michio Kushi

        The only way to settle questions of an ideological nature or controversial issues among the people is by the democratic method, the method of discussion, of criticism, of persuasion and education, and not by the method of coercion or repression.
        -- Mao Zedong

        Comment


        • #94
          Reading regularly. Marks attendance register.

          Comment


          • #95
            mmm....ok, im adding one of my own,
            i admit that i havent read the whole thread closely, so the way i go about composition may already have been touted, and its my results arent always v good anyway.

            but still....

            MY best pieces come from playing on the piano. Composing on a keyboard is very difficult to me, unless i am just inspired by a particular sound . There's something about the way a piano creaks and the echo when u put the pedal down that relaxes and inspires me.

            often i will have one part of a piece done maybe a year ago, and only just find a part that fits it this morning,

            but as it is an ongoing process, one part fitting another part means i always have a lot of options if i just cant compose a bridge on the fly which matches the current song.

            The elements which my best works have are, : a pulse, a real ebb and flow to the music, and plenty of space for the music to breath.

            If i simplify my ideas down i find i can arrange them much better for synths instead of just a piano, but i still have problems converting a piano tune to a full arrangement.

            anyway, that's my poorly described process, and if someone has already said this, thats fine.

            It's a great thread, and i try to read a little everytime i'm on.

            Thanks,
            Phil
            switching to Apple...not looking back...

            Comment


            • #96
              I second (third? fourth?) the "reading with great interest" motion. I only stubled accross it today, so haven't read it all yet, but it's good stuff, and has inspired me to start composing again, having had a break to work with technical stuff and set up my studio.

              Keep up the good work and I'll post something exciting, when/if I get inspired.

              Comment


              • #97
                Well, I didn't post last night - I had an early night. Trying to catch up on sleep

                Anyway, in a (weak) attempt to make up for it, I'll discuss a technique that I've personally been exploring for a couple of years - sections of variable length.

                Often I've found that using sections of "metric" lengths (four bars, eight bars, sixteen bars) can often give a piece a very stodgy, predictable pace. No matter how exciting or cool the actual musical material is, sections of metric length can really weigh a piece down.

                This is because the listener knows (or can guess fairly accurately) when each change will occur. In her/his mind, the listener has heard a sigificant amount of the piece before it's actually been played.

                Let me give you an example. Let's say that so far, every section has been sixteen bars long, and it's very obvious whether each section is static or transitional. Within a few bars of hearing a particular section, the listener already knows what the rest of the section sounds like - sometimes to the point of not actually having to hear the remainder of the section. This is the point at which the listener becomes distracted, starting to talk, or getting bored.

                I've found a particularly effective way to reduce this effect - variable section lengths. Instead of making each section a "metric" length (four bars, eight bars, sixteen bars, etc), the idea is to make them "odd" lengths. This has two main implications:



                  How you come up with the lengths is up to you. I composed a piece a couple of years ago where each section length was a Fibonacci number - the sections were all lengths like 5, 13, 21, 34, etc.

                  Another piece I composed had section lengths chosen by rolling dice.

                  Of course, it doesn't have to be random. You might choose prime numbers, or the date of every Monday in the year, or anything else. You could even choose the lengths as you compose the piece, depending on the flux in the piece.

                  It's really just about making the sections have lengths which aren't even multiples of four or eight.

                  Try it out.

                  Forever,




                  Kim.
                The Composition Thread is sticky!
                There is no heavier burden than a great potential.- Unknown source

                Comment


                • #98
                  Agh! The thread is falling. The thread is falling!

                  Oh wait, no, here I come to bump and save the day!

                  I like this last topic. It puts me in mind of a project I did once. I used to hit up the fiddling circuits in New England back in high school, and did pretty good for myself. One year I couldn't find a nice waltz for the contests. This was the summer after Final Fantasy VIII was released for PSX (or maybe the summer before?) in America, and I had downloaded the ball-room cutscene (like two thirds of the 8-18yo male population of the US, I'm sure), and I really liked the waltz that they played in the scene. So I transcribed the melody line and got someone to help me write the chords for it, and it was a HUGE hit with the audiences. People kept coming to ask me where I found it, and I just told them I copied it off of an old tape that I'd gotten my hands on.

                  I called it "Rinoa's Waltz", after the name of the female lead in the game.

                  Anyway, fiddle music is pretty much 8-bar plus 8-bar, AB music, since it's all dance music, and you have to be able to coordinate dancers, and I remember that the piece was in fact not based on eight bars at all, so when I went to transcribe it I had to alter it a little. There was a bridge part after the B that went back to the A, too, I think, which I left out. I think it retained it's character quite nicely though, in a standard 16-bar waltz. I was very pleased with the results (though I never managed to do better than 3rd place in any contest, these two local favorites always beat me out oh well, who said fiddle contests are fair).

                  Kiru
                  "Don't sell your life! Do whatever you really want to do. You must act as the master of your life, and then become free. No matter how difficult it is, no matter how unsuccessful it might seem, do whatever you want!"
                  -- Michio Kushi

                  The only way to settle questions of an ideological nature or controversial issues among the people is by the democratic method, the method of discussion, of criticism, of persuasion and education, and not by the method of coercion or repression.
                  -- Mao Zedong

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    Come on guys, share your secrets!

                    Forever,




                    Kim.
                    The Composition Thread is sticky!
                    There is no heavier burden than a great potential.- Unknown source

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Jeez
                      What? Does no-one care about this stuff anymore? Don't let this thread get buried!
                      Forever,
                      Kim.


                      Oh Lord! We are here, at basics, reading and becoming wonder when listen what happens using that on the keys.

                      About the chords notation, I think a mix of capital letters won
                      http://jd800center.blogspot.com
                      http://gilbertostrapazon.blogspot.com

                      Comment


                      • Some of my secrets in 25 words or less: bitonality (look at Milhaud), polyrhythms (Stravinsky, African drumming), microtonality (read Genesis of a Music by Harry Partch and Tuning In by Scott Wilkenson) and old fashioned development of musical material (Aaron Copland's What To Listen For In Music really lays out sonata form and particularly the importance of development). Also minimalism especially Steve Reich's Music for 18 Musicians. Also balancing out everyone's obsession with sound and rhythm by concentrating more on melody and harmony.
                        "Music is the best"
                        --Frank Zappa

                        For a good time, try http://analogkid.us/yabb/YaBB.pl

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Birdienumnum
                          bitonality, polyrhythms, microtonality and old fashioned development of musical material. Also minimalism (and) balancing out everyone's obsession with sound and rhythm by concentrating more on melody and harmony. Sorry, as I said, can't get really into it without a major effort.


                          Oooh, I think you're going to have to spill the beans now!! I'd really like you to cover those topics - even if it's in only as much detail as I've done!

                          Maybe just a paragraph (or two) summarising what it is, then a paragraph (or two) telling us how it can be used.

                          Forever,




                          Kim.
                          The Composition Thread is sticky!
                          There is no heavier burden than a great potential.- Unknown source

                          Comment


                          • I'd like to see this as well. I'd also like to hear 64 arps playing microtonal scales at once, but sadly, I never shall...

                            What else do people want to hear about? Someone requested some jazz theory - that's a big field - is there anything specific that someone is curious about?
                            Where would Kraftwerk be without the Beach Boys or James Brown? Where would hip-hop be without Kraftwerk?

                            - Ronan Harris

                            Comment


                            • A good many of us usually don't wear theory on our sleeves. I usually play what my ears direct me to play(am I making sense?). For whatever it's worth, I did inherit a new soloing technique(new to me, that is). I know that there is another thread on soloing, but I came up with something that I thought was interesting.

                              Say that the key or tonic is Bb(major or minor). You could try soloing with a Fm scale. I tried that on "Chameleon" and it added a lot of depth and character to the solo. Same can be done with C being the tonic with a Gm scale. This is probably what everybody is already doing, but I thought I'd share this with everyone.
                              http://www.soundclick.com/bands/page...m?bandID=73567
                              Soul On Tap
                              The Coupe De Villes
                              Chris Beard Band

                              current gear list:
                              Yamaha MOX8, Korg Triton, Korg CX3, Korg X2, QSC K12, Rhodes Stage '73(needs new tines), Ventilator, Reason 3

                              "Leave the ego, play the music, love the people.." - Luther Allison

                              Comment


                              • Just busting your chops, Birdie!

                                Tucktronix, that's a good tip - that was a good thread, too! I find that sometimes my theory and playing become intertwined, so while I'm playing I'm realizing what theory I'm doing - but I don't dwell on it, it just flashed in and out of my brain.
                                Where would Kraftwerk be without the Beach Boys or James Brown? Where would hip-hop be without Kraftwerk?

                                - Ronan Harris

                                Comment



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