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SteinbergerHack

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Posts posted by SteinbergerHack

  1. Has Pino Palladino been mentioned yet?

     

    Also, you may not have heard of him before, but check out Jerry Seay. Band is Mother's Finest, and he created some of the essential funk-rock bass sounds back in the 70s. I was lucky enough to hear the band live in about '78 or '79, and his playing still sticks with me.

     

    [video=youtube;ndipC4d8F0w]

     

    [video=youtube;aC7_LAklaHo]

  2. [shameless cross-post from another forum section....]

     

    I showed up last night for rehearsal for a show that starts its run this Friday, and I find this in the book.......note the key signature.....

     

    1457642762_SAScoreScan.thumb.jpg.25d251fa5a7232cd70176b69bc47c35a.jpg

    Ya know, I would be fine with it if it were transcribed in B....but Cb?

     

    angry02:philpalm:sm-explode

  3.  

    Your guitars don’t even have heads! :mad:

     

    :cool05:

    :lol:

     

    OK, OK.....

     

    However, the last two weekends I've used my Les Paul as primary instead of the 'Berger. IMO, this is what a nice book-matched maple top should look like. YMMV.

     

    [img2=JSON]{"alt":"Image result for Steinbergerhack Les Paul R0 VOS","data-align":"none","data-size":"full","height":"505","width":"296","src":"http:\/\/www.historiclespauls.com\/upload\/MauneyM_1149471279_PICT0042d.JPG"}[/img2]

     

    :thu:

    • Like 1
  4. Update:

     

    We ended up renting a set of 10 of the ATs, then supplementing with a Sennheiser G3 and a newer Shure operating in totally different bands.

     

    The headsets have been a real pain. Turns out that what we rented came with a bunch of very cheap Countryman knock-offs ($39 on the internet), so I ended up having to scrounge at the local GCs and other shops to find as many Galaxy sets as I could to get something decent going (no time for ordering). Not fun, but we finally have them working properly.

     

    One thing to remind anyone looking at this thread for reference: Turn off the 2.4GHz band on any router you are using for your console or other sound gear. It's easy to do - just use the 5G band for WiFi, and you will be glad you did.

     

    We were 7 seats from sold out last night, and sold out tonight. Things could be a lot worse.

  5. Final update:

     

    I ended up getting (7) DXR12s and (2) DXS15s. Three of the 12s go across the front (L/C/R) with the L/R subs, then 4 12s act as wedge monitor for stage and pit.

     

    I went with the rack X32, and it functions well for the $$$.

     

    Observations:

     

    The DXRs are very convenient, light, flyable, and easy to configure. They don't sound as good as my old Club series did, though. They seem to have WAY too much low mid/high bass, and the DSP setting don't help. I end up turning it off and having to EQ the snot out of them in the console. If they already have a DSP in the box, why on earth do they not have a setting for "FLAT RESPONSE"?

     

    The PC-based remote X32 app is not nice. Not user-friendly and absolutely will not let you make a small tweak to a level. It has a default deadband that is WAY too wide, IMO, which means that you can't just sneak in a minor adjustment without it going noticed.

     

    The third-party 'Droid app is much better, but missing a few functions. As a result, I end up having to use both, which is a pain.

     

    Summary - get an iPad if you want to use the X32, and be prepared to use a lot of EQ effort on the DXRs....but that still beats hauling the amp rack for passives.

  6. As an aside to this, my observation is that those Yamaha Club Series 112s have the flattest response of any cabinet I've heard in that price range. They just flat sound great for the money, and require very little EQ to get to optimum.

     

    I had a set of them and sold them, then replaced with the new DXR12s. The DXRs are definitely more convenient, easier to set up, smaller overall package, etc., but they just do not sound as good. I end up spending a LOT more time tweaking to get them to sound right than I ever spent with the Clubs.

     

    JMO, YMMV, etc.

  7. Redux:

     

    I gave up on sequencing and we just used recorded tracks. Drummer is nailing it with a wedge - he has this skill set from past experience. Bass has in-ears, as well.

     

    We opened last night to really good audience response, and the production staff is 100% happy with the pit musicians. 8 more shows in 3 venues....

     

    • Like 2
  8. Wedges won't work for a cue feed. At bare minimum the drummer (and / or conductor) will need a headset (or IEMs) and a click track in order for the orchestra to remain in sync with the sequencer (regardless of what sequencer you use), and you really don't want the audience to hear the click via the wedges / floor monitors.

     

    Also, it's important to know whether the drummer is experienced and comfortable with playing with a click before deciding to proceed.

     

    We have feeds available if someone wants to run their own IEM, but there's no budget to provide them.

     

    Every sequenced part has at least one percussive key line (harpsichord or equivalent playing steady repetitive rhythms) that runs throughout the piece or drops out partway through. Beyond that it's either percussion or loose wash FX. They are VERY easy to follow (easier than trying to stay with a pianist who won't watch the baton - my personal pet peeve).

     

    The pit group is quite good, and even n the first read-through they were following my conducted timing.

  9. What about a cue feed for the drummer and / or rest of the band? If you're all going to play with sequences' date=' that's absolutely essential...[/quote']

     

    We have two individual monitors for the pit, and we're using a Behringer X32 console so we can set mix easily. Shouldn't be a problem (famous last words before disaster strikes....).

     

  10. How many songs do you need to sequence' date=' and how many parts per song?[/quote']

     

    5 songs, 2 or 3 tracks per.

     

    Would a hardware sequencer (like say, a used Alesis MMT-8) be able to meet your needs?[

     

    Maybe, if I can program it easily and validate against the score

     

    Will you be creating the sequences in advance or live on the spot?

    All in advance, and they need to be very precise and timing must be predictable.

     

  11.  

    Pro Tools does allow you to edit using standard notation, but I still think C-Lab / Emagic did it better with Notator on the Atari ST back in the late 80s - MIDI has never been the strongest area of PT, although it certainly got better after versions 7-9. Nothing beats it IMO for audio editing though.

     

    Steinbergerhack, are you running a Mac or a PC?

     

     

    PC

  12. A big concern is timing. Are you going to play to a click/cue track?

     

    A programable MIDI foot controller such as the Yamaha MFC10 may help you trigger the parts in real time.

     

    [ATTACH=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"full","title":"9401737_800.jpg","data-attachmentid":32175488}[/ATTACH]

     

    Good thought! I have an ADA MIDI board that I generally use for my guitar rig, but might be able to get by without for this gig. I'm only playing a few of the tunes, conducting the majority.

  13.  

    Um...he actually made most of it by plagiarizing "Under Pressure." When he got sued, he worked out a deal to buy the rights to the song.

     

    As it turned out, it was the best career move he ever made.

     

    Sure - we all know that. Are you going to suggest that his lyrical styling was an example of epic songwriting? Yes, he ripped off a great bass riff, then added absolutely nothing of substance to it.

  14.  

    Now let me ask YOU one: Which would you rather have - a great song and a mediocre production / recording, or a fantastic production of a mediocre song?

     

    If I want to make money, I'll take the great production of a mediocre song every day, The airwaves are littered with well-produced dreck, while there are tons of great songs that never saw the light of day because the production didn't make the song go anywhere.

     

    Don't believe me? I have one shining example of well-produced shlock that made a ton of money: Vanilla Ice. Second exhibit - Van Halen.

     

    I would also submit for your thought experiment the majority of 3:30 country songs coming out of Nashville. For every really good songwriter, there are 10 weak ones who manage to fill out the cuts on a top-tier album....and they make money doing it. You can't take anything away from the Nashville studio circuit - those guys are as good as it gets anywhere on the planet, and it is their talent and skill that drives the Nashville money machine. JMO, YMMV.

     

    On the other end, I would point out that while Elton John and Billy Joel are fantastic songwriters (Scenes from an Italian Restaurant, Funeral for a Friend / Love Lies Bleeding). they wouldn't have had a career without great producers turning their piano-bar songs into complete orchestral works. Again, JMO, YMMV.

     

    Finally, I would pose this question: Can you name a single album that has gone platinum that was really poorly produced?

    • Like 1
  15. I would use ableton live and push. You can select various midi scenes in real time using the push controller. Large lighted buttons and made for live performance. https://www.ableton.com/en/push/

     

     

    Its not just for beats or EM music, this can be used for much more than that.

     

    Does Ableton allow you to enter and view parts on a standard score? Everything I've seen of it online seems to be oriented to everything BUT standard orchestral score notation.

     

    I've got several hundred pages of multi-staff orchestral score to track against, so I really need that capability....

  16. Although I've never seen that come up as an issue' date=' I would worry about drive sensitivity to loud music.[/quote']

     

    That could be an issue, but my laptop has a solid-state drive.

     

    I'm more concerned about the basic issues with having to use mouse clicks or a touchpad during a time-sensitive performance in a dark orchestra pit. Big buttons that are easy to see and ID are very helpful in this sort of application.

    • Like 1
  17. Has anyone here wver used sequenced keyboard parts in a live performance environment? What have you used, and what was good/bad/ugly about it?

     

    I have a mini-tour coming up that will require sequencing for a few numbers (it's scored that way, and no budget to add another player for just a few songs), and while I've done this in a studio situation, I've never dealt with it in live performance, so looking for recommendations and/or warnings.

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