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Alonzo Mosley

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About Alonzo Mosley

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  1. When I was in high school I tinkered with some beaters. But didn't have any resources (besides the local library, open two hours, four nights a week). Now, of course, I have the $$ to have nice guitars and other resources to learn how to work on them, but neither the time nor the space. When I lived in Philly, I found a nearby luthier (two blocks!) who salvaged my prized possession from high school, which had been sitting in the attic of a garage for 23 years. So that was cool. I will find a guy to get my 339 in shape and then maybe pick up a beater at a pawn shop and learn what I should have back in the day. Honestly, just changing the strings and flipping the saddle helped a ton. So thanks everyone who offered real advice. How hard is it to do a nut job (yeah, I hear it) myself? Or should I just leave that for the pro when I find him/her?
  2. For other guitars sitting in cases... Just if they sound/play funny? It's not like it's an every three years/30,000 missed notes kind of thing?
  3. Wow. OK. That's more than I would have guessed. How often should something like that be done?
  4. Yeah, that was my plan. I live about 90 miles from any good "wizards". And I'm pretty much always on the road for work. My plan was to drop it off on my way to the airport in March, and pick it up when I got back, but I was running late and figured "next time". But there hasn't been a next time yet now I've been sitting at home for six weeks... and the shop is very closed... Hence my new-found sense of DIY. Then you're not looking. There's more to life than packaging. Cans of Miller Lite say "Great taste", but if you compare Miller Lite to things that actually do taste great, you'd see that it's just marketing. 0.10's are objectively "light", as per anything I've ever read, ever. Including what I posted. EB's "Regular Slinky"s are 0.10's. Modus ponens. My point exactly. I may not know a lot about guitar repair, but I'm not a complete idiot. Pickup height?!? Hadn't even considered that. Knobs, nuts, etc., all seem OK. But that's just the surface. Just for giggles, when I do find a wizard, what should I expect to pay for this? Thanks for all the helpful info!
  5. Getting rid of the guitar is not an option. I almost made a comment in my post, "Don't give me {censored} for my strings". Because the one thing I remember about high school guitar drama was, once you got past the Fender vs. Gibson nonsense, and whether "La Villa" or "Evolution" was the better showcase, was what brand of strings you bought. But I digress. Ernie Ball absolutely makes Slinky lights: I have no idea how it was set up, and certainly had no clue - after all these years - what a difference it made! That makes sense, I guess, but I'm gobsmacked. Any good primers on what to do if I ever want to change gauges? Like what the set up OUGHT to be? Thanks everybody for humoring me along this process.
  6. OK so put new strings on. That took a lot longer than I remember! Stretched 'em good, I think. And... It seems better. The 2 string is a lot better and the 3 string is somewhat better. So you both may be right. I am amazed. In all seriousness, why would dead strings act that way?
  7. I will try to replace the strings tonight. The 1st fret does agree with the 13th, and they don't agree with the open string. (And now that I know what to ask, I'm seeing this is not an uncommon gripe with 339 owners! But they complain more it about "staying in tune". It definitely holds its tune. Just...) Question about lubricating it with pencil lead - how do I do that? Like, literally just pop the string out the nut and write in it with a pencil? The only strings I have are Ernie Ball Slinky Light.
  8. Fair enough. I'll see what I have in the closet. (Not like I can pop down to the shop...!) I guess I wouldn't expect an old bad string to be so consistent in its weirdness.
  9. OMG Duh. I was thinking "upside down", even as i was looking at it to see why it would make sense. April was a very long year. Of course I lubricated my nut slots - oh, you mean on the guitar. No, didn't know that was an option. The room's humidity fluctuates a bit. When I'm not home, it can get down to 50s in the house. Humidity can get up into low 60s. (The dehumidifier is in the next room, with my vinyl collection.) I just assumed the tension of the string would be too high to adjust the saddle - like it would do bad things to one or the other. To adjust it, |: I loosened the string, adjusted it, retuned it. : | It has eben a while since I changed strings. If they weren't the same gauge, they were damn close. (Like I may have light on and had medium before or vice versa). Not sure I understand what you mean by the string hanging - like it's just "stuck" in the nut? Doubtful, given the loosening and tightening described above, right? I'm thinking that since it's so extremely out of tune, the hair-length difference of flipping the saddle won't help much. The bridge appears to be solid. Thanks for all the advice and help diagnosing. I used to work with a help desk for auto repair... So I empathize. I started this project hopeful that this would be an easy DIY job that would make me happy and proud of myself. If it gets much more complex, I'd rather pay a professional than screw up something I like.
  10. Wow! Thanks everyone for your suggestions! DeepEnd, I hope you're wrong. I really like this guitar, and it's fun to play (although sounds terrible). So here's something interesting. I've focused so much on the 2 and 3 strings because they're always what sound wrong to me. But it turns out that if I check the 12th fret, they're ALL a little sharp! But 2 and 3 more so. (I mean, if they all went the same way together, I'd never notice until I played with someone else, right?) I didn't try flipping the saddle yet. Will both sides be notched with a groove for the string? If I understand what you're saying, Djangler, is: Put the capo on the first fret, and tune it (to F/Bb/Eb/Ab/C/F, I presume?) - and then go about adjusting the saddles? I was under the impression I shouldn't adjust the saddle with the string on there... As far as "when", that's an interesting discussion. I bought this guitar seven years ago when overseas and played it constantly. Back in the States, I'm rarely home (like, 3-4 times a year). So it sits in a gig back, lying flat on its back under the bed. I really only noticed this about a year ago. I believe. I can't believe I wouldn't have noticed the first few years I was playing (but I was a crappier player then, so maybe I just didn't know). Once I noticed, I just presumed I had {censored}ty strings that wouldn't hold a tune. Sounds like a job for a professional. I'm not comfortable playing with truss rods or anything like that. I believe the action is OK. I had some guitars in high school where you could fit a Denver omelette between the string and the neck., so again I may just not know what good is. I've attached a picture, don't know how effective that is. Again, sounds like I need a professional. Explain one thing, though. I don't understand why the nut would contribute. Why would the nut impact ONE string and not ALL strings?
  11. I am 100% unsavvy on guitar repair and maintenance. I have an ES-339. I'll tune it, but the 2nd and 3rd strings - once I go beyond the second fret, sounds sharp. My Google-fu skills tell me that means my saddles need adjusting. And to fix a guitar that's sharp, bring the saddle away from the neck and towards the right-hand side of the bridge (I guess, in effect, making the string longer?). Anyway, I've got the 3rd string pegged as far as it goes. And look how sharp it still is! Is this something I can address? Or do I need to wait until the guitar shops are open again? Thanks.
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