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Vito Corleone

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Everything posted by Vito Corleone

  1. I don't know if we have any transitions that I would say border on brilliance, but when doing covers there is nothing that says you can't be creative with arrangements. You don't want to make things unrecognizable, of course, but I think far too many bands take the "play it just like the record" thing way too far. Just hire a DJ if you only want a band that's going to sound like one.
  2. I'm with E-Money that the average listener doesn't notice. In the pantheon of "this song sounds too much like the last one", the key of the song is probably the last thing the average listener will connect on. I would also say it matters less if you have any time gap between songs. If you're stopping for even 5-10 seconds? I seriously doubt the key of the song will matter at all. My band does a lot of medleys where we cram bits and pieces of a bunch of songs together with similar tempos. On the opposite end of that spectrum, I used to believe it was important to have the songs be in the same key or at least be in keys relative to each other so that the transitions between songs would be as smooth as possible. Or maybe modulate up a key to add extra excitement to the medley. But I found out that it really doesn't matter. At least not in the manner that we play things and the audiences we play for. No doubt type of material and audience you are playing for are factors as well.
  3. Depends on the songs. If they are all blues songs of similar tempos, I'd say pretty important. Unless you want to run them all together as some sort of medley/mash up thing. If you're going from a rock song to a disco song? I'd say not at all.
  4. I think it just depends on the song and what you’re going for. Unless you’re trying to fool people into thinking you had a real drummer on the track, what does it really matter if the hi hat doesn’t stop for the tom fill or whatever? Who’s going to notice or care? Other musicians? As long as it sounds good?
  5. Do you reverse this for left handed drummers? I only think of this because I’ve played with a leftie drummer for years, so whenever I hear “audience” panned toms on recording, they usually sound backwards to me.
  6. [QUOTE=Red Ant;n32515178] People can stumble and get back up, you know :D[/QUOTE] So he stumbled over the shark? :D
  7. [QUOTE=Red Ant;n32515177] Trevor'd been using that same Fairlight orch hit for years before then, its all over the Art Of Noise records, and a bunch of other productions he'd done. To my shame, I used it as well... I had access to the Fairlight through the NYU sound lab, and overused it shamelessly on my 1st ever "official" project, called "Intellectric", in 1983. Fortunately for everyone, the masters did not survive the years, and there were only a few thousand 12' singles pressed, so I never need worry about anyone actually hearing the music :lol:[/QUOTE] Art of Noise’s first album came out the following year. and I don’t think anything they did predated “Owner” by more than a few weeks, if at all. In any case, it was the first time I had ever heard it and probably most of America.
  8. [QUOTE=Red Ant;n32515174] I never liked any Yes, tbh, and thought *at the time* it was better than anything they'd done since Bruford left, but for me it REALLY does not hold up today.[B] Its more like Trevor Horn's shark-jumping moment :lol:[/B] [/QUOTE] But yet you just cited things of his he did that you like that came AFTER? ;)
  9. I never bothered to compare it to their earlier stuff, of which I was never much of a fan of anyway. It sounded like nothing I had ever heard before. First time I had ever heard samples used like that.
  10. And coming back around to the prog thing, “Owner of a Lonely Heart” blew my mind first time I heard it.
  11. Re: Van Halen. Ive never been a big fan of what Ted Templeman and Donn Landee did with drums sounds. Either with the Doobie Brothers or with Van Halen. But “Fair Warning” f’n rocks!
  12. I love a lot of the 80s synth stuff. Tears for Fears. Simple Minds. Howard Jones. Some of that production is dated now, of course, but I loved it at the time. Fresh and groundbreaking and I was soooo “please don’t make hear another southern rock thing ever again!” at the time. The prog bands? Well it was either go that route or go home. “Tormato”, anyone? Can I get a shout out for King Crimson’s “Discipline” though? Love that album and the production. Billy gets a pass from me because I heard him say once that he came up with the idea of “Uptown Girl” while sitting at a table in a bar with Elle McPherson (who he was dating at the time), Christie Brinkley and Whitney Houston and he was like “WTF? How did I end up HERE?” Sometimes it’s best to just roll with it.
  13. True. But the fact is those production styles wouldn’t have worked in the 80s. And I certainly understood the need for updating sounds at the time and I don’t hate the 80s stuff as much as some people here. But that Arif Mardin thing? Wow. Made David Foster sound restrained and subtle.
  14. Stopped by a friend’s house for dinner and he has some music playing in the background and an Arif Mardin 80s production — Chaka Khan’s “Through the Fire”, which I probably haven’t heard since the 80s—comes on and I thought immediately of this thread. gawdawful!
  15. Pat Metheny/Lyle Mays’ “As Falls Wichita, So Falls Wichita Falls” never fails to give me goosebumps.
  16. I also really like Lyle Lovett’s “Joshua Judges Ruth” for great sounding 80s
  17. Chuck Ainlay did an amazing surround remix of this album in 2005. De-80s-ed the mix just a bit as well This is one of the “demo” discs I use when I have friends over and want to impress them with why I think surround mixes can be so superior to 2-channel stereo. If you have the setup/and or the opportunity, you should check it out.
  18. Hmmm. I would disagree those albums had better production or mix. But even if you prefer them, you still have to agree the sound of this album is fantastic? Not one of my favorite albums — and a couple of tracks are waaaay overplayed—but it is one I return to just because sounds so damn good.
  19. [QUOTE=onelife;n32509355] I find it interesting that in a lot of pop music acoustic pianos were "treated" but with digital pianos we try to get them to sound as natural as possible. [/quote] Well, except for the several dozen variations on piano sounds included with every workstation synth. Including having "Sexy Sadie" delay. :) [quote] I also think it's interesting how the Moog synthesizer made an appearance on The Beatles' last album (Abbey Road) as if they were ushering in a new era on their way out. [/QUOTE] I always thought that album pointed the way towards the 70s in a lot of ways. The synth parts among them. One of the first '70s' albums is the last album by a major 60s group. I feel the same way about "Bridge Over Troubled Water".
  20. I had an 8track cassette deck like that. TASCAM 488 surprisingly decent quality considering they squeezed 8-tracks out of a cassette. I agree that pitch controls were mostly for matching things up. What are you going to do if you want to overdub a piano track and it’s not tuned quite the same as the guitars you already laid down?
  21. I can do that too. I consider it a musical memory thing. It sounds more natural for your wife though. Mine comes mostly from having heard Hey Jude so many times in my life that the opening note is burned into my brain. Ive known people with true perfect pitch. I worked with a guitarist years ago (he was blind, BTW) for whom you could hit any note on a piano and he could call out to you what that note was as fast as you could play it.
  22. Sometimes, but not always. It never occurred to me that Madonna’s voice had been sped up. I know she sang lower as she got older, but don’t most of us? But in retrospect, yeah it makes sense. I just always thought she sounded a little chirpy. Lol. I have a pretty good sense of what I call “trained pitch”. I can string a guitar and tune it to A-440. I can sit at a piano and tell it is tuned high or low. I can sing an “A”. But i can’t tell a note or key of song just by listening to it. I’ve just memorized certain sounds over the years.
  23. If there was some “magic key” to a song, then why not just play it in the key in the first place? Why try to change it to that key later? (And how many songs have ever been sped by more than one semi-tone? They all just happened to be a 1/2 step off?) that fact that they changes are being made at the very end of the process leads me to believe it’s much more of an afterthought.
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