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The Real MC

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Posts posted by The Real MC


  1.  

    Quote Originally Posted by ElectricPuppy

    View Post

    Why it's taken so long to get there, I have no idea.

     

    Because the owner - Musicians F®iend - has placed higher priority on sales promotion using the Harmony Central home page than on the discussion forums.


    Based on their deployment of HC 2.0 and higher, I have zero faith the forums will improve.


    Until MF sells HC, it won't be the community it once was.


    This is not aimed at the moderators BTW.


  2.  

    Quote Originally Posted by ElectricPuppy

    View Post

    Why it's taken so long to get there, I have no idea.

     

    Because the owner - Musicians F®iend - has placed higher priority on sales promotion using the Harmony Central home page than on the discussion forums.


    Based on their deployment of HC 2.0 and higher, I have zero faith the forums will improve.


    Until MF sells HC, it won't be the community it once was.


    This is not aimed at the moderators BTW.


  3. Quote Originally Posted by guido61 View Post
    I suspect the technology exists, but that not enough people are willing to pay for it to make it financially feasible for any company to produce. People don't want to pay more than $500 for a controller and then bitch that it doesn't have the action of a $40,000 Steinway. idn_smilie.gif
    And that is the core of the problem.

    I bought my Kurzweil MIDIBoard brand new for $1700 back in 1989. In those days good controllers were made and people paid for that quality.

    I'm always disappointed when today's controllers don't have the feel and features of my MB. They're nowhere near as sturdy and rugged either. And with cheap manufacturing and cutthroat competition abound, the market no longer exists for a decent controller.

    Is my MB obsolete? It doesn't implement 14-bit NRPNs but there are hardware add-ons for that. I am happy with my MB and it doesn't need to do EVERYTHING.

    The people who bitch about price are reaping what they sowed.

  4. I'm an EE. If Rickenbacher is calling this a "boost" then it is actually be a pre-emphasis design, where the EQ flat out is actually a -6dB pad and the "boost" simply nulls the pad at selected bandwidth. "Boost" usually implies gain greater than unity, which isn't possible in a passive system without an energy source or feedback network. And it is very difficult to prevent passive filter circuits from interacting with impedance changes, IE volume control, cable capacitance, and input impedance of the amp all will impact the operation of the boost/cut.

    It may be labeled "boost" but it has none of the benefits of a preamp.


  5. Back in 1998 I had a business trip to Buffalo and visited the former site of 1970s-80s Moog Music on 2500 Walden Ave. The original building was still there and at the time was operated as a flea market building, and the only indication of its former glory was the Moog hockey game in the arcade.

    Moog abandoned the analog synth market in late 1985 and I visited the factory back then. Picked up my Memorymoog there at the "fire sale". $1000 Memorymoogs, $200 Polymoogs, $200 Sources, and $200 Taurus II Controllers in the fire sale. After that, the bank approved a business loan on the condition of NO MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS hence the hockey game and phone products.


  6. I still have four S-181s in my PA, two per side. They project really well, even in a long hall. The dispersion is pretty even. The S181s are compact for their sound too. The only minus is the speaker cavity is tight and 18's with deep frames will not fit.

    I have been gigging since 1981. Always preferred JBLs for tops and EVs for lows. Never heard a good system with them the other way around.

    The reason I have two per side is that with one per side I blew a coil twice from kick or floor tom - I like punchy low end.


  7. Sony ceased being Sony when they became a content provider. The content division clashed with the technology division often, and too many of their products were either crippled or had compromises to appease the content division. IE a Sony device could record media but not make copies - something that really irked content CREATORS. I refuse to patronize Sony.


  8. No BS, unfortunately. Feminazis have rigged the system against men. It is too dangerous to have an intimate relationship with a woman anymore. I didn't have kids but I got shafted during my divorce. With the current system, this country is now a cesspool of batsh!t insane women conspiring to legally extort your earned income.


  9. ^ Pretty much echoes my assessment. I am semi-retired from gigging. Didn't sell my stuff so I built my studio after I moved to a new job and new town. With a few exceptions, the caliber of musicians in this new town is medicore. Tried to start a couple of bands but they went nowhere. Most of them want to play brain-dead guitar-dominant modern rock, there's already five bands playing that stuff in clubs. When I suggested a classic song with keyboards, they would bring in a modern version with no keyboards. I was vocal about my frustrations but got tired of being ignored.


  10. Quote Originally Posted by koolkat View Post
    Minimoog Styx - Fooling Yourself
    Intro is ARP Odyssey actually. Concert DVD showed James Young playing it, and a photo from that era shows an Odyssey on JY's side.

    1st and 2nd solo are Oberheim SEM not Minimoog. Key to that sound is routing EG to oscillator 2 pitch only - just a minute amount. Very subtle but effective. Minimoog can't do that but when I dialed it up on a SEM it was the exact same sound.

  11. When you are working with an established group of musicians, they tend to be territorial. If you play extra parts over and above the recording, two responses are possible: either they like what you are playing, or you are intruding on their turf. The territorial ones - esp guitar players - guard their turf jealously and are reluctant open up space to let you in.

    There are guitar players, and there are musicians. The latter are open to new ideas and you will enjoy the experience. The former may be more "this isn't a paying gig" and unless you enjoy playing lifeless backing pads there may not be much of a future with them.


  12. I've owned a Porta-B and Leslie 760 since 1981.

    The vibrato on the Porta-B is a phase shifter and not the scanner delay line like the B-3, you won't get that lovely scanner vibrato purr of the B-3. But the Porta-B *does* have the full 91 tonewheel generator and tube circuits like the B-3. It also has spring reverb and fifth harmonic percussion that the B-3 does not have. I was never bothered by the diving board keys and can do smears on it fine, the technique is slightly different.

    It's half the weight of a B-3 but you'll still want a 2nd person helping to set it up. It has two pieces: the top half contains the TG, manuals, preamp and tone shaping circuits, the bottom contains the power supply, power amp, reverb. The bottom has two support legs on hinges that flattens down for transit. Make sure the crossbraces are included for the legs. There's a mating connector when you place the top half onto the legs, and also a power cord that has to connect to a two-pin connector or the organ won't turn on.

    My particular Porta-B SCREAMS. I have had plenty of Hammond snobs play it with the same reaction, changing their perception of spinet organs. Despite the lack of scanner vibrato, it is a really effective sound and to this day I still run into musicians who ask if I still have that great sounding Hammond. It's not an organ for jazz or gospel, but it works for everything else. Jon Lord did use a Porta-B, I remember videos of him onstage with one.

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