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Wyatt

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  1. I believe the Analogman offers dual wet outputs. The way most stereo chorus work hasn't changed since the Boss CE-1 came out in 1976. It sends the dry signal to one amp ad the shifted signal to the other. The chorus effect isn't created until both signals mix in the air as soundwaves,...it's incredibly spacial and encompassing live. The effect is created in the air right around you...if you listen to either amp by itself, you don't hear any effect at all. The CE-1's sister amp, the Roland JC-120 works the same way...dry out one speaker, 100% wet out the other, you have to mic both speakers to get the chorus effect. The problem with dual wet setups is they tend to turn to mud live because they don't layer well. For a stereo Leslie style, I would probably spring for a dedicate Leslie sim, one that will allow horns plus baffle.
  2. Stratosonic, available in various years, Cherry or TV Yellow, in P-90 or HB's.
  3. Can't really help with the comparison to the Wizard Wa. I have keep two wahs for a long time. I have a RMC3 that I bought new in 1996 ("Sleeper" model) and a early '70's Sola Sound/Colorsound wah. The WOF is based on the Colorsound wah and that tight and punchy low-end (that retains its volume) is one of the big pluses of the Colorsound design and why it was so popular for funk. The traditional Vox-style wah, which drops volume and losses definition with the heel down, Hendrix made great use of that to control accenting certain notes and letting offers "fall back"; the RMC3 is similar, even when dialing in the "CS" (for Colorsound) presets in the old manual, it just never had that same "umph" at heel down.
  4. Can't really help with the comparison to the Wizard Wa. I have keep two wahs for a long time. I have a RMC3 that I bought new in 1996 ("Sleeper" model) and a early '70's Sola Sound/Colorsound wah. The WOF is based on the Colorsound wah and that tight and punchy low-end (that retains its volume) is one of the big pluses of the Colorsound design and why it was so popular for funk. The traditional Vox-style wah, which drops volume and losses definition with the heel down, Hendrix made great use of that to control accenting certain notes and letting offers "fall back"; the RMC3 is similar, even when dialing in the "CS" (for Colorsound) presets in the old manual, it just never had that same "umph" at heel down.
  5. Originally Posted by Pine Apple Slim Your right, I stand corrected. I've read the Voodoman horror stories. Maybe I'll be able to fix it or build one myself. It's just switches, LEDs (if there are any on the original) and solder joints, I would guess any fx pedal repair/mod guy should be able to fix it.
  6. Originally Posted by Pine Apple Slim Then I might just drag this ol boy outta the closet. 2 SS preamps into 120 W of 6L6 glory. The footswitch is bonkers tho, anybody know where I can get one? 3 buttons-ch1, ch2 & combiner with a midi pin plug to the amp The ones I see are all Channel/Combo/Reverb...looks like Switchdoctor and Voodooman both make those...only buy Voodooman via eBay where you have Paypal to back you up if it's not delivered. I have no knowledge of Switchdoctor.
  7. Originally Posted by Aristotle I'm digging the insights into the history of tube production. HC should flesh it out into a full article...would be a good read. Tubes have be obsolete since the '60's. Into the '50's, they were household staples....your hi-fi needed them, your radio needed them, your TV needed them, even the early "portable" and bedside clock radios used them. The local drug store sold tubes just like they sold light bulbs and fuses, most stores even had a tube tester (which is why testers are a dime a dozen on eBay). By the mid-'60's, all that was left was the cathode-ray tube in the TV -- tubes were dinosaurs, no longer needed in general society. The only reason RCA, Sylvania, Mullard, RTF, etc keep making them was for military contracts. Want to know why there are so many NOS JAN 6L6WGB tubes around...they controlled the flight servos in F-16 jetfighters well into the '80's. But once the military upgrade the electronics and introduced no equipment, by the mid-'80's, there was no longer a need for the tubes and all those companies quit making the tubes (and many went out of business). But, behind the iron curtain they were slower to upgrade...the Sovtek 5881 is realy a Russian 6P3S, it controlled the flight servos in MIGs, by the time the Russians were moving out of military use of tubes, the cottage industry of guitar amps and tube hi-fi had created enough of a market to continue production. But it's a small market and, while we are in a boon of great new production guitar and audio tube choices, I don't know how long competition will continue; rumor is SED (Winged C) is moving out of the audio tube market or at least scaling back in favor or more industrial products. Tubes are still used everyday by you, I and the whole world over. If you listen to radio or watch TV, all of those are broadcast from large 50,000-watt, 100,000-watt, 300,000-watt (or more) broadcast towers all powered by...very large tubes (and huge capacitors). My friend at CNN really, really hates it when it's time to swap one out.
  8. There really isn't much excuse for EL84 over 6V6GT's anymore. Manufacturers have been happy with the Electro-Harmonix 6V6EH, and now the Tung Sol 6V6GT and JJ 6V6S, there are lots of options for a manufacturer to buy at steady quantity. But, short of the DRRI, you won't find much second-hand form the '90's. People do have to remember that in the early '90's, tube choices were super slim. The last 6V6GT and last true 6L6GC both went out of production in the '80's, most companies were running on massive supplies they had built up and others were buying from a trove of military NOS. Even the EL34 became super scarce with the loss of RTF (they closed when Germany unified) and EI (bombed during the Balkan War)...ever wonder why Marshalls all used 5881's for a while? Mike Matthews hit it huge (again) by finding a reliable high-power tube in high production, for most of the early '90's it was the only tube most manufacturers could get in large quantities. So the crappy Sovtek 6V6 came out in the mid-'90's and only Fender jumped on the bandwagon with the new DRRI, no one else would build an amp around it. Even Fender used the EL84 for the Pro Jr. and Blues Jr. But around 2000 (give or take), the 6V6EH came out and enough manufacturers liked it to start introducing 6V6 designs...Top Hat, Dr. Z, Allen, and lots of others really jumped all in. I think some of the popularity of the EL84 comes from cutting corners. The Sovtek EL84 is available wholesale for cheap...the EL84 uses the same noval tube socket as the typical preamp tube (only have to stock one part)...it runs better at lower voltages...it can be more easily mounted to a PCB...and you can fit EL84's closer together in a smaller chassis (lower raw material costs). All of these add up in large-scale production. Plus, it's not like it's a bad tube...Vox, Marshall, etc. (even Gibson) all released classic amps built around the EL84 and many boutique designs are derived from these.
  9. Originally Posted by notjonahbutnoah Man... in 2012, when we have a million delay pedals that are absolutely killer, can it really be worth it? I mean, I have almost no experience with any kind of actual tape echo unit, but I've heard a lot of delay pedals, and when set right, they sound amazing. I just can't imagine repeats/echos sounding much better. Maybe I'm wrong/ I don't think "better" is the right word. The beauty is in how much worse they were. Very low tech and analog, but incredibly complex. 1. The preamp has a lot to do with their unique tone, being able to overdrive a the EP-1 and EP-2 or the thick tone of buffered preamp of the EP-3 adds a lot of their character. 2. Then there are the things all the digital sims are trying to copy..the mild, inconsistent, unsymmetrical modulation created by the wow and flutter of the tape 3. Then there is the tape itself...noise and hiss are noise and hiss but they fill out the sound of the echos and the low fidelity tape meant dark repeats that were distorted without being harsh...they almost seem to brood emotionally Still, I found the fun factor no longer offset the hassle factor for me.
  10. They are nice, but not worth the hassle for me anymore. I sold my EP-3 a few months ago and it had been years since I used it. The SS Echoplex's are famously unreliable, often fragile -- I've known they to break down just being transported to a gig, and in the pre-WWW days, mine went through three techs before they could get it working again. Then we come to the matter of obsolete tape. It's not made anymore...at all. An Echoplex (and tape echo really) needs lubricated, lo-fidelity tape (the lower fidelity tape is less abrasive and easier on tape heads). The best tape stock is non-existent in the market; most cartridge winders make do with good, but not great tape, and some have even used tape that is very bad for the tape heads. And then there is the noise, both warm and analog and downright nerve-racking at the same time. If you want that Echoplex tone (a la Dead man soundtrack), no simulator will do, I have NEVER heard a tape echo simulator that was ever close. But for me, once I heard the clean, warm, hassle-free delay of the DM-2, I quickly forgot the Echoplex altogether.
  11. The Custom Vibrolux Reverb (CVR) is NOT a RI. It started of as the Brown Vibroverb RI (one of Fender's very first RI, before they introduced the DRRI and TRRI), but they made changes when it became the CVR. The "global" reverb bridges the preamp channels pretty early in the signal chain which raises the noise floor noticeably. And then the lack of negative feedback works against headroom, makes t harder to tame and also adds noise, but the positives are a more immersible 3-D sound. I think it's a fair comparison to the a Vox though, as wjbratcher noted, it is more of a Brown Fender, more mids, more aggreessive.
  12. Originally Posted by hotmess What do you mean "had it set" at 8 ohms? Unless there's a specific jack or switch, that means something had to have been done to the output transformer or the output transformer has been replaced. If it is meant for 16 ohms and you're running 8 into it, you're really at a risk of killing your amp. I believe all the Chinese-made Voxes (Customs and Hand-Wired and previous Custom Classics) have a small impedance switch near the jacks.
  13. Originally Posted by Dolf Thanks! Removing one speaker is easy. A lot easier than needing to buy a multimeter to test them individually. Especially since you would have to disconnect them for a good DMM reading.
  14. So, it's a 2x12" combo? The most common way to wire that is two 16-ohm speakers in parallel for an 8-ohm load. But, you can't take anything for granted because they aren't stock and you are several owners removed from the mods. Celestions are coded on the front of their gasket....T4427 is 8 ohm and T4436 is 16 ohm. This is ... of course ... genius because you can't read it without removing the speaker. Can't find a way embed this, but you can see the gasket here.... http://s664.beta.photobucket.com/use...rimary]=images
  15. I agree with the near universal answer of $2K-2.5K. It should be noted that since LP Standards were not made in the early '70's, dealers could factory order Deluxes with full-size humbuckers. While Deluxes that have been converted to full-size HB's are more common, you never know until you check the routes. I believe a clean, stock '72 LP Deluxe is in the $3.5K+ range still.
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