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JamesPeters

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  1. JamesPeters

    sold

    Item is sold.
  2. JamesPeters

    sold

    Item is sold. Thanks!
  3. Good to know James. Thanks! I have been talking to Tony about his Chimera but I want to sell this first or trade straight up if possible. Tony's a good guy to deal with, in any case. Good luck!
  4. There are only a few of the new Chimera amps, and the owners are not letting go of them. Just figured I'd let you know.
  5. A few things I'd like to include: 1) The amp has the mods mentioned. It's as up-to-date as it gets for the Chimera (single channel 50W anyways, in that format). It's also one of only two single channel amps I've made in the last 4 years, the other being a single channel Halo amp actually. So if you want a single channel Chimera...well, this is the only one. 2) The amp is in whatever condition Tony (sinnerx96) says it is. Tony is a trustworthy seller I'll vouch for. (He's also telling the truth about funding the purchase of a 100W dual channel Chimera, and if anyone wants to confirm this they can attend the next NJ ampfest to see it.) As of October 2008 this amp was in mint condition since I personally saw it when in NJ. 3) No, there is no "Van Halen switch" on the amp. That's a joke. I didn't realize I was being filmed when I said that. 4) That is not me in the picture or video. I'm actually 65 years old, 6'3", and speak with a heavy German accent. Ok I'm lying, that's me. 5) Here's the area of my site that describes this amp's features: http://www.petersamplification.com/overview_2008.htm 6) The speakers used for that clip are Celestion G1265. They help get that sort of sound from the amp. Being able to play like Dennis or Dave (in the videos) also helps.
  6. Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! It is mine.................... I knew i was gonna get one `o these one day...... Chris Hi Chris, Let me know what you think of it when you get a chance to run through it. Email me if you want and I'll forward some information on its functionality to you. (james@petersamplification.com)
  7. Note: that is a single channel Peters amp. It's not footswitchable. A couple people have asked me if I could supply a footswitch, so I figured I'd mention that. Information for the JP-10 can be found in the manual on my site (linked from the FAQ). Also, the JP-10 doesn't sound like any of my new models. It's a warmer sort of high gain sound, made several years before I thought of the newer designs. The JP-10 sold for $1400 at last they were being produced.
  8. So, that makes me wonder... how exactly does this JP-10 sound?? Is it HIGH-gain (metal). Is it tone-ful? I was thinking about it, but your statement above doesn't sound very enthusiastic about low-wattage amps tone, gain, or performance. That is only my take on it. Absolutely no disrespect intended. Thank you!! It sounds...like it sounds. I have no sound clips of the amp anymore, sorry. It's a good sounding amp. I'm not enthusiastic about the 10W amps for the reasons I mentioned. A fair number of people bought my 10W amps expecting them to sound just like higher powered amps, to be able to have the same kind of headroom at jamming levels and so on. I tried explaining the differences, but people didn't seem to either believe me or understand...I'm not sure which it was. Having a 10W version of an amp (since I had both 50W and 10W versions) which was less expensive might've driven people towards the 10W version thinking it should be "close enough"...I dunno. Anyway that's why I don't make them anymore. It doesn't mean they suck. Don't read that into what I was saying. You should talk to the owner of the amp for more information. Maybe he'll provide sound clips or comparisons for you. I'll support the amp but I would rather not be promoting it, and I'm sure you understand the reasons why.
  9. Note: that is a single channel Peters amp. It's not footswitchable. A couple people have asked me if I could supply a footswitch, so I figured I'd mention that. Information for the JP-10 can be found in the manual on my site (linked from the FAQ). Also, the JP-10 doesn't sound like any of my new models. It's a warmer sort of high gain sound, made several years before I thought of the newer designs. The JP-10 sold for $1400 at last they were being produced.
  10. Note: Of the clips on the Petersamplification.com website that demonstrate the tones of the Gryphon, this particular amp will reproduce clips 1, 2, 3 & 4 (possibly 5 as well - James could confirm that) as those clips were recorded with an amp of the same build type as this one. Clips 6 & 7 were recorded with the more recent models (with the shared EQ) in which James modified the highest setting of the gain boost, and the overall voicing of the amps, to be more modern in its attack and focus. Confirmed. Clips 6 and 7 are done by the newer version which attains a more modern character more readily, and remains a bit more focused (which is handy for tighter attack with low tunings). The sounds in clips 1-5 however should be attainable by this amp without any struggle. Also this amp has an extra feature you didn't mention. At your request I'd put a feature (lifted from the JP series) into the amp: the "shallow/deep" attack switch. That's the large metal toggle on the top/back of the chassis. In "deep" mode the amp gets a bit looser and bouncier, somewhat more "vintage".
  11. By the way James, I've only seen one of your amps in action once -- but it sounded amazing! Totally kicked my ass. Thanks! I'm glad you liked it! I find the whole "boutique" conversation odd in general since I can't even really call what I do "boutique". I mean I guess I can, but the boundaries for what defines the word vary from person to person. I also started making amps which were more simple and got "carried along with the tide" making amps which have more features (trying my best to keep the features sensible in the way they work, of course...which is an ongoing struggle whenever I make a new design). On the surface, my next models won't seem "boutique" to most "average boutique amp buyers"; they'll seem more like a Mesa or something to them. I used to care more about what the "average boutique amp buyers" would think, but I realize now it's not practical to be concerned about that when the idea of whether I'm "boutique enough" to them is subject to debate. Of course if I used whatever parts (or design approach) of-the-month that are trendy and bragged about them as though they somehow made my amps better, I'm sure I'd get more of the "boutique cred". I refuse to do that though.
  12. Since my name has been brought up a few times, I'll lend some information. I don't know if it'll prove anything, but it might shed some light onto this subject. -To my knowledge I have sold amps to people who are between 18 and 55 years of age. I never know what age a customer is going to be or what music they are interested in until they speak to me (and even then I don't always know what age they are). -Some of the youngest customers have bought some of my most expensive amps and some of the not-so-youngest customers have bought some of my least expensive amps. -Some the youngest customers have bought some of my most classic sounding amps, and some of the not-so-youngest customers have bought some of my most modern sounding amps. -Some of my customers play out and some don't. Those who don't aren't going to give you any indication of what demographic buys my amps by playing at gigs because they simply don't play gigs. Also, some of my customers who play out choose to keep the Peters amp for home or recording purposes depending on their situation (especially since I used to sell 10W amps). -I haven't sold nearly as many amps as most well-known amp companies, so when my amps appear before the eyes of others it's always a rarity technically speaking. -Whether my amps are considered "boutique" or not is always open to debate. I make the amps by hand--myself--yet their feature sets (especially on the new format models coming soon) tend to make them fit with what people expect of amps which typically aren't considered "boutique". Most handmade amps don't have multiple channels with separate EQ, loops, voicing switches and so forth. I also don't particularly advertise on my site that my amps are handmade by posting closeup pictures of the amps' innards because despite my making them by hand, I don't think it's critical to have made them by hand. I also may switch to using PCBs at some point in the future. In the end I'd say the OP has a point speaking in general. Lots of amp builders today market their amps towards "blues" or "rock" instead of "hard rock" or "metal". Take a look at the amps they make though: they're usually based on more classic amp designs both in terms of sound and functionality. That by its nature will make a certain demographic want it, and another not want it. And if the clips on the site happen to be "blues" or "rock", that will also make it seem (to the average person) as though the amps are only suitable for those sounds. Add to the equation how many younger people have a lot of disposable income, and it becomes clear where the generalization comes from. The whole situation though is actually broader than that. If you want to generalize, go nuts. I'll still sell whatever I sell to whomever I sell it to.
  13. I don't like that cab or the speakers it comes with (and yes, I've used the speakers "broken in" and such, lol...it has nothing to do with that...) But I don't like the Ultra Plus either though. It's all personal preference. So if you like the cab, be happy.
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