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jhall

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  1. Sorry I forgot to add: A good Greenback IR! And I forgot to mention I run into a pair of powered Mackie HR824 monitors
  2. With my Trem equipped Strats I like to have the trem capable of a full step pull up. I commonly use them for that. It screws a tad with your tuning stability for long string bends but with a little "feel" practice it's doable. Floyds I could never bond with as I often rest my wrist on the bridge and it both feels weird and seems too easy to mess up the pitch of your axe whilst in action. Other than that I'd love that style of trem.
  3. I love both! The P.J. is quite a little amp! Both similar yet.... different. B.J. is one of Fender's most appealing offerings. If you run one into a Two notes capture and line out it into a good Greenback 4x12 IR and dime it (or close to it depending on your level of squish needed) it can sound really really good. If you listen to that tone recorded and in the context of a mix it is great! Pro Jr.? IMHO that amp can do no wrong (again I rarely use EITHER of these amps without being in congruency with a good cab IR). This way I can play it blasting like it is designed to do and have a GREAT tone. The best thing is to have both amps. If you can only have one I'd have to go with the B.Jr just because of it's advantage in features but you won't be able to "exactify" the sound of the P.Jr.
  4. Believe it or not I made it out of two layers of 1/2" homosote screwed to 1x stock . I made six frames this way that assemble with two 3" screws each. Then I made dual 3-1/2" layers of rockwool insulation encapsulated in plastic. (Those large 3 mil contractor bags are perfect as you can slide two batts side by side into them and tape them off creating very sound absorbent panels that you can use in a bagillion different ways). I actually find myself stuffing an amp into a closet and just piling those "bags" around them and the mic stand and they are brilliant! The Iso box when assembled takes up half of the damned room but sometimes there's no substitute. I must say though that I recentely got a Marshall 1912 1x12 100 watt cab that was a little spendy for a 1x12 but it sounds excellent and can go into a very small space for sound treating.
  5. In many cases for home noodling, I find Computer based modeling to be great! I have a huge pile of tube amps from the days of yore too. And I'm kind of old (56) and should be one of those "it can only be tubes and analogue or it's just a snapshot of the real thing" types. I find myself smiling ear to ear using Guitar Rig 5 into a Behringer U-Phoria 404 into a Soundcraft folio mixer into a Pioneer 1080 1970's era receiver into a pair of Polk 12b towers. It sounds epic and goads me to just keep playing. That said, I do LOVE my old amps and have built an iso box so large I can fit a 4x12 into it and it isolates so well I can crank my 100 watt Marshall heads and only hear what comes out of my monitors if I want. Still for quick, easy and great sounding home guitar playing I tend to use the computer based ( I own most every consumer level sim software out there and right now I'm fixated on GR5 even though it's a little long in the tooth I find myself choosing it even over Helix Native.) But yeah.... For me I think tubes are the long term winner. If just for the sake of history.
  6. Funny you mention that. My son who is 15 and a pretty good drummer (not a prodigy but a great feel and sense) Has become completely in the bag for analogue recording. I ended up building him a drum room in my studio (by studio I mean I converted the two bedroom full kitchen and bath cottage behind mu house that I decided not to rent out anymore). He got and fell in love with using this ancient Scully 14" reel 1/4" two track built into this ridiculously HUGE formica Poo brown console. He runs that into a 1970s era Yamaha live venue mixing console that is the farthest thing from what I would consider a studio usable desk. I always argue to him that having just two program outs and no direct outs isn't the best option for recording drums. That it would be best to use our regular console and have each of his 12 drum mics on their own track in either Reaper or pro tools. Well he took that as a challenge and damned if the boy didn't hash out a great (albeit a virtually un post fixable) stereo sound for his kit that translated extremely well to my media room stereo. Still unusable IMHO as all you can do is either "drums up or down" or perhaps do some creative cloning and EQing . Me, I'd at least like to be able to put some reverb on the snare :-)
  7. I have had a AD 120 VTH (120 watt stereo head version) since they were introduced. I found the best sound comes out of it when it is loud. So no real (bedroom level) benefit from THAT amp. But it sounds great when turned up and the power scale is at least at 30 watt (x2). It has also been a BEAR to keep working. I've found a LOT of cold solder joints in the power section. Then I've had to do the old Deoxit in ALL the input jacks and there's a LOT of them on this amp. But yeah... turn that sucker up on a quality speaker cab and it delivers quite well in the toan dept.
  8. jhall

    Bugera amps

    They make great sounding amps. I have a 1990 and a V-55 head. and a V-5 combo. I had a 333XL head and a V-22. The V-22 is a legit excellent amp (gave it to a client who fell in love with it). The V-55 head is real nice too but the speaker inputs were very fragile and I replaced them with "real" ones wired directly to the daughter board. It sits in my amp barn as I have too many amps. The 333XL head I had was an excellent hard rock amp with tons of power and even with the gain cranked you could hear every note on 6 note chords and dissonant extensions clearly. That amp needed the 'ole cut the molex connector off and wire the power tranny wires right to the board pins (after this the amp was pretty much bullet proof). Sold that to a guy in a gigging band who has been using it 20+ gigs a month for six months and zero issues. The 1990 has the same awful speaker jacks and need the same fix as the V-55 HD. These are very good sounding amps that are fitted with terrible jacks. They should be fine with careful use but one slip up and you are fixing them. As far as sound goes they are right up there with the amps they seem to copy. (I can't think of what the V series is copying they are unique). If you've ever opened one up you can see that the PCBs are very well put together and look about as good as the Jet City and Blackstar stuff. Over all in my experience they re real nice amps that need to be treated with a modicum of care. JUST BE CAREFUL WITH THE SPEAKER JACKS and you should be fine.
  9. To me it seems more like the "cut" knob on my AC15C1 except it adds bite as you turn it clockwise instead of reducing it on the real amp.
  10. It makes the pedal as versitile as hell. Adds a ton of flexability to it.
  11. Gave in to the GAS and ordered one off of Amazon. I paid the extra $3.99 to get it overnight (I'm a prime member) so it was $44.00 to my door within 16 hours. First it went right into my powered mixer. Sounded great. Then right into the front of my Bugera 333XL on the clean channel. WOW!!! Really really Great!! Either this is one excellent pedal or the Bugera is a much better pedal platform than I figured it should be. I then went into the effects return of the flaming booger but found the front end to be the bees knees. It may help that the Bugera is perched on top of a couple of closed back 2x12s with a mixture of V-30s and GT12-75s. But damn if that pedal doesn't sound excellent. It has reams of sounds too. Even though it is a "character type" amp sim pedal, it is an excellent overdrive-distortion in its own right. Next up... I'll be getting the British pronto.
  12. Originally Posted by Fender Picker Nobody voted for the JJs yet. I figured they would get the most votes. Do the power tubes have that much effect on tone anyway? FP I have never had a set of JJ el-84s that were worth a damn. They go microphonic on me fast and are dark and dull sounding. I do have a passable pair in an AC-15 but the stock sovteks were better actually. I find sovteks to be much better tubes than are generally acknowleged on these forums.
  13. Originally Posted by Fender Picker Nobody voted for the JJs yet. I figured they would get the most votes. Do the power tubes have that much effect on tone anyway? FP I have never had a set of JJ el-84s that were worth a damn. They go microphonic on me fast and are dark and dull sounding. I do have a passable pair in an AC-15 but the stock sovteks were better actually. I find sovteks to be much better tubes than are generally acknowleged on these forums.
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