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I was The Funk

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  1. I've developed a method of teaching this using UI design and history. As you see a piano keyboard evolve out of the diatonic scale, the reason for things being called the way they are becomes more clear. Basically modern music teaching has a C major bias that causes a lot of confusion. Like, why "C"? Why not "A"? Why does "Oct mean 8, but there are 12 notes in an octave"? History shows that the interface of the piano evolved as the requirements of playing music within a mathmatically derived system evolved. It wants to be diatonic, but it has to cover exceptions. The keyboard is consistent with the nomenclature of the system and its evolution, whereas something like a guitar is based on the evolution of usage by the masses over time. This is why you can know next to no music theory and play the guitar, whereas you actually need to know what you are doing to play a piano.
  2. Loud enough to hear myself mixed appropriately with the other players, ie. slightly louder then them so I can hear what I'm doing. I usually accomplish this by pointing the amp at my head with a stand. I'm usually playing somewhere around 2-3 on the clean channel of my amp, and about the same on the dirt channel, which is modified to reduce gain. I use a boost for solos, and try to keep all of my dirt at the same overall volume so that the changes are textural. I would MUCH rather the soundman amplify the band. He has way more control. When we have to provide all the volume ourselves, I find the stage volume gets painfully loud. I'd rather be loud enough to feel like I'm rocking, and loud enough to get the people dancing, but not loud enough that people need to be at the back of the room, or leaving. Its all about entertainment. If the crowd isn't into it, it doesn't matter how powerful your amp is.
  3. SM57 would work in a pinch. But what you REALLY want is an SM7b. Also, get your oktava modded immediately. You might want to pick up a pair of small diaphram condensers at some point, and maybe a ribbon depending on what else you're recording. But with all of that and a treated space, you should be just fine for a while.
  4. Has anyone had any luck running the 400f on Vista 64bit? It seems to only want to work in 16bit, which is a problem for all of my 24 bit projects. Which is...all of them.
  5. This is why I tend to record at 96khz and have the mastering engineer with sonic solutions (look how THAT scores on the site) dither it down. I want to get as much info as I can (as well as avoid any dodgy low pass filtering on my converters), and then let the guy with the good gear translate it.
  6. I tend to use 96k 24 bit for anything releasable. The reason however is to sort of bypass the low pass filters in the converter circuitry. Well, not to bypass, but to push them up beyond the audible spectrum so that when it gets mastered, it can be brought down to 44.1 16 bit through better converters.
  7. Good stuff. It usually takes me 3 or 4 to warm up, then I can hit it consistantly until my voice gives out, which is after about 20 and it's all downhill from there. The one I can't stand is the "ANYTHING GOES". It's too hard to advise how to make the performance better since it keeps changing. I just shake my head, and hit record like a monkey. Rarely does anything good come of it, because I lack the patience. I often work with a bass player that was like that. But I found that his vision for the par was often clearer than mine (not in terms of notes but in terms of flow). Since he had a small setup at home with a decent preamp, I just give him bass-less comps and he takes them home and comes back a week later with the whole record perfect. Way less frustrating then being there for the whole thing (especially since he likes to augment and play around with his mistakes), and I can concentrate on recording the other parts knowing I'll get perfect bass overdubs soon.
  8. I play one. Its definitely loud enough and I play in a two guitar band. the only thing that could be an issue is the headroom. With a humbucker guitar like my Sheraton it breaks up in an early AC/DC way at about 3. With a strat you get a similar effect at between 5-6. Its a great sounding amp. I don't use the trem much, but the reverb sounds great pointed straight up. Tone knob is best straight up. So basically you only have to deal with a volume knob. Just a pure, kick-ass amp. Tkaes pedals well. I'll probably never need anything bigger. Any place thats too big for it will mic you anyway. I played an outdoor gig with it once unmicced and it kept up fine.
  9. And here we cut straight to the core - pretentious. Sure, they're ugly, feel like plastic, are solely played by artless douche bags and dentists, and I've never gotten as far as plugging one in to find out of they're as sterile sounding as they look, but nothing says pretentious like playing *rock and roll* on a quadruple A grade piece of wood that's been clear coated a thousand times, flamed to look like a {censored}ing hologram, and has a meticulous inlay of birds in flight. The second you strap that bull{censored} on you are Liberace, if Liberace played the music of rebellious youth, which would make him even more ridiculous. PRS is the equivalent of a $5000 Thomas Kinkade print. Damn, I wish I wasn't late for this. I hate those {censored}ing things. Even under the terms of their tacky modern style are they not well done. They always look awkward and unbalanced, and non-neutral colored bodies always look like butt when they match the headstock. They have that distinctive look of guitars designed by luthiers, people who know a lot about building intricate things out of wood, but know nothing about how to actually make them look good or tasteful. Dude. Paul Reed Smith is a luthier. He designed PRS guitars. They used to be all one off customs. Also you can't "flame" wood to look like a hologram. Thats the natural grain. That's what the wood looks like. Also, I note that you haven't played one. Try it. They play really nicely. They are very well balanced, do not feel like plastic, and sound great through pretty much any amp.
  10. The real reason that I wouldn't buy one is not listed. I like the hollowbodies a lot. And I like the CE series quite a bit. McCarty's and customs never really did it for me. But the real reason is that you are looking at a 2k+ guitar and in that price range there are a lot of smaller builders that can likely build a better instrument for the same cost which might be more to your liking. A PRS hollowbody can cost nearly 5k. A custom made artinger is around the same. Different tastes, of course, but at that price range your should get exactly what you want. There are many very fine guitars for less (Godin comes to mind) that are very competive with factory prs's. That said, a PRS might be exactly what you want regardless of price, and it should therefore be what you get.
  11. AFAIK, it is completely possible to get all your aminos w/ a Vegan diet. But I'll have to respectfully disagree w/ eating veal and fois gras, but to each his own. I'm sure you're a healthy dude. IMHO the only thing extreme about veganism is the choice of an animal free diet and lifestyle. Extreme is one word to choose, but it's different than say eating one meal a day - that's extreme to me. Its possible yes. But you have to work a lot harder to do it. Meat contains them all in one package. You have to find a lot of different sources to get them otherwise. The part that I don't understand is denying yourself much of what is good in cuisine. There is good vegan food, but most vegans I know just aren't fans of food. Like they can't even cook a vegetable well. To each their own though. I love eating good food.
  12. :facepalm: Veganism is 'extreme' to some people. But, it is NOT an Extreme diet when followed in a healthy manner. The yahoo who suggested a diet of wheat noodles does not represent a comprehensive Vegan diet of grains, greens, fruits, veggies, soy, etc. I've met plenty of very healthy Vegans. 2 of my best friends are Vegan and I used to live w/ one of them. We used to make some pretty kick ass meals that were delicious and healthy. Your other advice about getting a cookbook and stuff is good, but if you knew anything about Veganism, you'd speak a little more open minded about it. I lived with a vegan for a year and a half. I know all about it. Any lifestyle based upon cutting out all animal products, regardless of derivation or use is extreme by definition. Besides, animal proteins contain more complete essential amino acids. We are build to eat animal protein. While I've had some tasty vegan food, I would not reccommend the lifestyle to anyone. Cut out fish? Cut out veal? foi gras? {censored} that. Limit yourself to vegan only restaurants? No way. To turn your back on nearly the entire development of cuisine for the last several thousand years can only mean you don't like food. I love food. But you have to keep it in balance. Small portions of very high quality, organic, natural foods. Cooked skillfully and creatively. Washed down with water and a nice glass of wine. And when you wake up in the morning you go for a run and do some yoga, and have a great day. THAT is a lifestyle. And it keeps you looking good too.
  13. This is dumb. He wants to lose weight not eat {censored}ty food 6 times a day for the rest of his life. My advice is learn how to cook properly so that you can make healthy AND tasty things. You know everything that goes in, you can cut out fat, and you can control portion size. Diets are easier when the food is good. Switching to vegan spaghetti only diet is like going from no excercise to marathon running in one day, stupid and most likely overwhelming. No whole wheat and vegetables do not provide all the protein you need. And that link you provided shows how primates also eat insects, birds, eggs, invertebrates of all types. So basically, you cited something that disproves your idea. I am not anti-vegan, but going vegan isn't necessarily going healthy. I know many unhealthy vegans as they still eat like {censored}. I know many healthy omnivores who love bacon and cheese but do so in moderation and with the backup for excercise. Veganism is an extreme diet. Extreme diets never work. My advice to the poster: Get a stove. Learn to cook. Its not hard in reality. Get a cookbook, and try a recipe. Or even go online and try a recipe. Buy really good, fresh ingredients and cook something. Its more intimidating then hard. Once you make a couple of good meals, it wont be intimidating anymore. And the food will taste better then anything you can get for takeout. You also need to decide whether you hate excercise more then you hate being fat. Starting this thread is an indicator that you do. Now realize that if you do nothing, then nothing will change. That should be motivation enough. Your body WANTS to work. Thats what it is designed for. Once you stop going to the gym or moving at all, it is very difficult to get going, but in the long run, even in the near term, your body will feel better then ever. You have to break through the initial barrier. But you will. Just get out and do something. Every day. And make it fun. Go walk to see something cool for an hour. Thats a start. Do that every day. Then do something different. In a couple of weeks you should feel different. Then take it up a notch. Go for a run. Then a longer run. Then a bike ride. Then join a gym. Its all about just making it happen. Eat lots thoughout the day, but eat natural foods. Limit carbs and fat. Your body was designed for vegetables, fruits and meats. So eat those. Processed foods and artificial foods (like sodas) are the worst things you can put in your body.
  14. Come on guys, you just HAVE to spend that kinda change if you want to sound 100% exactly like Gilmour. There is just no other way to nail that Time solo tone without $50,000 in gear. Money is not the issue, tone is. fuzzface + binson echo + hiwatt
  15. Phaser is one of the effects i use most. Not sure how I got into the phaser but I remember encountering a small stone when I was about 14 and thinking, man, thats cool. I had a phaser on an RP5 in high school that was part of some crazy patches. I picked up a vintage small stone and a vintage ross (which i can no longer find...) somewhere in college. I almost always use it for chords and clean. Not for single note lines pretty much ever. Sometimes I combine it with a chorus to be more organ like. I sometimes also use it in conjunction with my wah and a delay for echoey filter sweeps.
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