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Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/18/2019 in all areas

  1. 3 points
  2. 3 points
    You know what really messes with the tuning on a 12-string? 12 STRINGS!
  3. 3 points
  4. 3 points
    to some extend i'm totally with you but there are (still) limits. also since that time my musical taste has changed and/or expanded and so have my ability of playing music expanded. some limits are skill wise, i'm not really into jazz and so my skills of it are very limited, aswell i'm not into shredding and tapping as i mostly do not like the music which comes out of it, so i never cared to practice such abilities some limits are tastewise, i will not play fake tradtional tirolean music or german schlager and the like, i do not want to play the classical wedding music etc.. but if you need to make a living out of it, you need to play and practice what you get the bills paid, and i didn't want to put myself into this position. this is total personal to me, and i will not judge anyone who thinks or does completely different....or maybe i did when i was young, but i didn't know anything at that time while i thought i know it all so instead of becoming a musician i became an IT guy who loves to make music with his friends
  5. 3 points
    Oh I think $350 is ample money to get a good guitar. There are so many good guitars around these days that it's hard to go wrong. The Yamaha FG830 comes in around that price point and that is an excellent guitar.
  6. 3 points
    I think its absolutely essential - vital, even - to practice with a click. So that you don't need one to record And in my experience, if you want to "learn time" its equally essential to keep the click on 2 and 4, only.
  7. 3 points
    Engineers have so many choices in post theses days that they spend less time on the input side and employ the fix it in the mix method. Thinking you can make a silk purse out of a sows ear leads to more sows ears and less silk purses
  8. 3 points
    My "music sensei" (guitar/theory teacher, mentor, close friend) insists that everything changed - and not for the better - with the introduction of the click track. The musicians may still be human, but they're locked into a temporal straightjacket, if you will... it robs the music of its breath, which is essential for imparting human feeling. Im not 100% sold on his theory, but it does make a great deal of sense. Having made hundreds if not thousands of recordings, both with click and without, i can certainly attest that the results are different, and not just in how tight the performance is. Its always easier for an engineer if the musicians use a click, but whenever I record musicians who have "good time" I will usually lobby for them to forgo the click and play "free". And I never use a click on any of my own group recordings.
  9. 3 points
    Maybe because they had a full orchestra with actual musicians playing together at the same time in an actual acoustic space... ditto for the early rock recordings... now music is laid down a track at a time with very little interplay. IMO, the music was just better. In the day, we took it for granted... now we look back in awe.
  10. 3 points
    Your guitar will be fine, water or saliva won't do much. A solvent like nail polish remover could conceivably melt the lacquer insulation on the pickup wire and short it out. Spilling beer, soda large amount of any fluid into/around a guitar amplifier is very bad and should be avoided.
  11. 2 points
    Probably the score of the decade. And most certainly a case of being in the right place at the right time. The pawnshop in our local town usually have a few guitars for sale and I often pop in when I'm passing. A few weeks ago when I called in it turned out to be 5 minutes after a used Walden N730 had been put out on display. It was a discount sale due to one of the tuner buttons being broken - a large chip where it fitted onto the tang. Sale price £44.99 Solid cedar top, solid Indian rosewood back, layered (as Taylor say LOL) rosewood sides, mahogany neck, rosewood fretboard and bridge. I bought it, of course. A blob of epoxy resin fixed the tuner and it plays like a dream.
  12. 2 points
    Even gave us this souvenir sound hole after the tour
  13. 2 points
  14. 2 points
  15. 2 points
    Heard there was a forum upgrade and figured I'd stop by. Really miss the old days here. Loved the pedal talk, but even more so the sense of community and silliness.
  16. 2 points
    Well, we get that great sound with only two ears. Yeah, back then, they had to put their effort into the basics - performance, mic placement, gain structure, etc. In order to have access to the best talent and equipment, you had to have proven your abilities.
  17. 2 points
    I've never met a Yamaha guitar that I didn't like - at any price point. Several years ago I bought a Yamaha F-310 for $175 new and used it for many projects. It turned out to be a surprisingly good guitar
  18. 2 points
    I care not about Dusty's sexual orientation, but I think she was an excellent singer with good control and taste. Some songs just work better with a sax, others with guitar, others with trumpet. Here is an example of an Elvis Presley song that my older sister had on an album that I dearly love. The sax solo is by Boots Randolph and IMHO is one of the all-time best Rock/Blues sax solos on record. I don't care for Boots Randolph on his own albums, but I understand you have to do what pays the mortgage. As a session player for something like this it's superb. The recording was obviously done live with all players playing at the same time, and you can hear them musically interacting with each other. Everybody's performance on this track is excellent. The sax comes in at about 1:32 I play sax, wind synth, flute, guitar, bass, drums, keys and vocals, so I am not saying a guitar couldn't do this better because I'm biased, it's because the vox humana of the sax is exactly what is needed in this cut. When I was a little kid, this is one song that made me want to play sax. This is why I love saxophone #1. Insights and incites by Notes
  19. 2 points
    I love the saxophone, it's my primary instrument. But whoever did this solo IMHO did not play with appropriate expression to compliment either Dusty or the arrangement. I've heard inappropriate sax, guitar, piano, synth, organ, trumpet and just about anything else solos. If it were me, I would have played it on tenor so as not to compete with Dusty's excellent vocals, I would have not used those inappropriate pitch bends (scoops), I would have matched Dusty's expression to start the solo and then perhaps gently drifted off to slightly different phrasing. Or else, I might have started with Dusty's phrasing on the melody and then drifted off to what I hope would be appropriate, minimalist, improvisations with a lot of air space. When you aren't the "star" of the record or song, your job is to do your best to support the star, and too many musicians would rather compete, disregard or outshine. But, every performance can't be our best one. Insights and incites by Notes Why I love the saxophone, here is another bossa nova [video=youtube;0-vlX8uRLMQ]
  20. 2 points
    Ted Nugent's solo in "Journey to the Center of the Mind "captured my imagination in 68 and I was definitely into the Beatles Good Times
  21. 2 points
    This is the final article following the chain of costs associated with how a piece of music gear gets to its retail price. We’ve previous explored MSRP vs MAP and the expenses associated with running a retail store and how those figure into pricing, so it’s time to dive into the final part of the pricing equation- the cost of designing and manufacturing a product. For the purpose of illustration in this piece, let’s use a $200 MSRP boutique overdrive effect pedal made in the US by an actual company (not a guy in a garage) that is available at many major retailers. This simplifies the math because of the relatively low part count and labor as compared to, say, building drum kits or digital synthesizers. Following the MSRP/MAP approach discussed in our article on retailer pricing and our case study pedal has an MSRP of $200 and MAP of $160, we can put a stake in the ground that the retailer paid the manufacturer about $100 for said pedal. Many musician’s will (understandably) think the price of manufacturing is just the BOM (bill of materials) for the pedal and some nominal amount of labor. Like most things in life, the truth is much more complicated. A piece of gear begins with an idea, and then R&D and engineering. Provided there wasn’t a marketing/executive dictate that “thou shalt design X style piece of gear,” designs will go through dozens of iterations once the foundation has been established, and engineers are likely juggling a half-dozen projects at a time. To be extremely conservative, let’s asapply 20 hours of focused research into the category and another 20 hours of experimentation to build the foundation for the effect (breadboarding, troubleshooting, etc). We aren’t counting the years of training that got an engineer to the point where they can tackle a project like this. An entry-level engineer makes $60-80k per year, so we’ll use the middle of the road hourly wage ($34/hour before benefits, or $50/hour with benefits, insurance, and tax); we have $2k in a pedal assuming one focused week to go from idea to working prototype. It’s now time to take that circuit out to testers/artists to get feedback. This will easily be 80 working hours (travel, correspondence, meetings, research). Now we have an additional $4k in user testing and feedback. Assuming everything went well the first go-around, it’s now time to put together a BOM (bill of materials) and design a PCB. The BOM can be defined based on what works best or to meet a price point, but likely represents the smallest expense in a pedal. As a standard overdrive variant in this example, the cost of parts, jacks, switches, and electronics can be relatively small; let’s say $25 assuming a price-break for volume ordering and pre-drilled, fully silk-screened enclosures. One thing people point to when considering the price of parts for modern gear is the perceived cost savings in DSP (digital signal processor) hardware as opposed to now-expensive and part-intensive analog solutions. This is true from a pure cost-per-component standpoint, but doesn’t take into account the programming that goes into the chip (a consideration not needed for analog parts). The median starting salary for a DSP developer is $78k per year, so this work quickly get more expensive than using mojo-drenched analog parts. PCB design and manufacturing can be done in-house, but typically gets outsourced to someone like Cusack Music’s fantastic Stompboxparts.com, where engineers design, test, and print through-hole or surface mount boards, can populate them, and even offer enclosures and varying levels of assembly, from completed products to unpopulated boards and empty enclosures. Whether outsourced or handled in-house, there’s an associated $10 labor with every pedal produced in a standard production run. So we’re at $35 in parts and labor for a simple circuit pedal, which leaves $65 in profit for the builder. OK, now let’s get back to the real costs. That $6k in (overly-simplified) work up front needs to be taken into account, so let’s spread that across an initial run of 1,000 units at $6 each. Additionally, we can add another $10 per pedal in rent, utilities, shipping labor, etc. Website and marketing will add an extra $5 to this first run as well, plus $10 for administration, bookkeeping, supplies, etc. We’re now at $66 in cost in the pedal, so there’s $37 in profit, less 30% for business tax, and we’ve got about $26 profit per pedal. All that math shows if this pedal sells 1,000 units in the first six months there is, in theory, $26k in profits to reinvest in the business, try new marketing, dedicate to longer R&D cycle products, and pay the owner (usually not the designer or builder at a certain point). So, Parts and Labor- $35 After Cost of Manufacturer Operation Costs- $60 After Manufacturer Taxes- $74 Sold to Retailer- $100 After Retailer Operation Costs- $140 After Retailer Taxes- $144 To Customer @ MAP- $160 Final Sale Price + Taxes- $173 Or Parts and Labor- $35 Combined Manufacturer/Retailer Operations- $65 Combined Manufacturer/Retailer/Customer Taxes- $31 Combined Manufacturer/Retailer Profit- $42 Thanks for taking this journey. As I cannot state enough, there are more assumptions I’m not including that negatively impact all parties (start up costs, credit interest, sales and discounts, trade show and travel expenses, sales, warehouse, customer service, rework). Whether you agree with the associated expenses or not, I hope you have a clearer picture of what goes into pricing. The music industry isn’t unique in this; it’s how things work in commerce in general. This information might be jarring if you’ve never been offered a peek behind the curtain of costs, but realize there is an entire infrastructure needed to support bringing you the gear you want. ____________________________________________ Chris Loeffler is a multi-instrumentalist and the Content Strategist of Harmony Central. In addition to his ten years experience as an online guitar merchandiser, marketing strategist, and community director he has worked as an international exporter, website consultant and brand manager. When he’s not working he can be found playing music, geeking out on guitar pedals and amps, and brewing tasty beer.
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