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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/02/2019 in all areas

  1. A DVD, YouTube video, chord chart or book can show you what positions to put your fingers... but you're right - becoming fluid at repositioning from one chord "shape" to another is challenging. And unfortunately there's no real secret trick that I'm aware of to getting good / fast at it. What it takes is repetition. You're trying to build up muscle memory, so your fingers go from one place to another easily and quickly, and without really having to give it any conscious thought. The way I did it, and everyone else I know did it is to just do it - a lot. In the beginning, you will need to do it very slowly. Start by learning how to play the open first-position G chord, C chord, and D chord. Those are the three primary chords in the key of G. Once you learn how to play the G, practice going from that to the C chord. Position your hands on the G chord and strum slowly two or four times, then reposition to the C chord and strum slowly (at the same tempo) two or four times, then switch back to the G chord and strum two or four more times. Do the strums at whatever (slow) rate you need to in order to have time to reposition for the new chord in the space between strums without having to delay the next strum on the new chord, and so that you can play the chords "cleanly" without buzzes or unwanted muted strings. This will help not only with the muscle memory, but it will also teach you how to keep time and play at a constant tempo or pace too. If it takes you five seconds to reposition between chords, then strum at a rate of one strum each five seconds. As you get more comfortable with positioning your hands to the proper chord shapes you'll be able to do it faster - it might only take you two seconds to switch between chords, so when you get to that point, use a tempo of one strum each two seconds... but stick with a slow, steady tempo at first until cleanly switching between chords becomes second nature. Then go a bit faster and keep practicing until you master the changes at the faster tempo, then speed it up a bit and keep practicing until you can master it at the new speed.
    2 points
  2. My thoughts are very simple. A cheap tele, particularly if you get it in a pawn shop, probably has so many other issues that the pups don't matter (remember all the dynamics of pawn shop guitars). My suggestion would be to get the best tele you can, do whatever it needs to be really playable, THEN change the pups to whatever you want. Changing pickups is easy, making the guitar playable might not be. ps - I remember our discussion from the DIY subforum
    2 points
  3. Read what Phil said, then stop searching and start doing what he said to do. That is how I taught myself to play and it worked. Good luck.
    1 point
  4. i will not disagree, but in front was also october and after zooropa came pop which i also think are great.... i personally lost interest in what came after pop, my favorites are still the 4 i listed above... but i must admit u2 is not that often in my play list anymore, as it was 15 or more years ago
    1 point
  5. Forgive me for stating what should be obvious, but conductive shield (done properly) is an application of science . . . too often done by people who sorely lack understanding. People who casually state things like "works just as good" almost universally have only an assumption, and do not have any technical measurements or similar performance assessments. THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW: 1. By its very design, it is impossible for a guitar to ever have a 100% Farraday cage. Penetrations in "the cage" for pickups, pots, etc. require penetrations that allow (minor) electrical interference to enter. Any issues from this are extremely minimal; however, this needs to be understood. 2. Every type of metal has a unique set of characteristics, including an ability to be conductive. Copper is vastly superior to aluminum - in fact, most building codes ban aluminum wiring because of its shortcomings. Household "tin foil" or HVAC aluminum tape are not recommended. (Again, aluminum is the least desirable material. Tin foil lacks conductive adhesive and is ridiculously flimsy. HVAC tape thickness creates an undesirable height gap between the pickguard and body.) 3. Any electrical circuit requires continuity which means that every element MUST have a good connection to other components. Tape without conductive adhesives are simply not made for conductive shielding - soldering laps is perhaps a satisfactory workaround but it inferior to doing it correctly with tape that does have conductive adhesive. 4. Combining copper shielding tape and conductive shielding paint is acceptable. Paint is preferred for rough areas such as wood in a body cavity, whereas tape is preferred for smooth/slick surfaces such as plastic guards. You can use shielding paint on plastic but you may experience adhesion problems. If you want to paint plastic you should first clean it and apply a thin coat of primer. 5. It is absolutely essential to use a grounding lug/grounding wire for a conductive shielding system to work. 6. Shielding tape on the back of pickguards and cover plates (when installed) must have a solid contact (connection) to the body cavity shielding. A common way to do this is to extend the body cavity shielding (paint or tape) outside of and around the perimeter of the cavity by approximately 1/8" or so. (make certain to not extend the shielding to a point that will not be covered when the pickguard or cover is installed. Cutting corners may allow you to save a few bucks and maybe think you're smart, but the end result will not provide the desired result. If you're going to invest the time and want a quality result you should always use the best possible materials and quality workmanship.
    1 point
  6. I'm going to guess birch plywood. It was actually used on a lot of guitars during that period and could have been pressed into an arched shape.
    1 point
  7. The Things We Do For Love - 10cc
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  8. C, D and G are the IV, V, and I chords of the key of G. Probably the easiest to transition between and again, the basis for a great many songs.
    1 point
  9. Have you priced lessons locally? When I took them (30 years ago?) they were about $10/ half-hour, but you had to pay for the month's lessons (4 lessons) in advance, so it was $40/month. I really, really recommend some kind of in-person lessons for all beginners! It's very easy to fall into bad habits while learning to play, and it can be difficult to fix them later. What a lot of people don't understand is that there is a very real physical, almost athletic, hand/muscle memory that's part of playing guitar. Think of it like training to run a marathon. It's not going to happen in two weeks or even two months. The learning curve for guitar is steepest at the beginning. Which means getting started is the hardest part. Learning guitar happens at several levels...the first bit simply learning and memorizing things like the notes of the strings, which notes at which frets, chord shapes, ect, ect.... Then there's what I call "finger memory" - your hands and fingers have to be taught to play the guitar too! I suspect this is what's frustrating you, but there's no real shortcuts. You've just got to do the work.... Learn three chords to start out. I'd suggest C, D and G. I remember this stage of learning, it's brutal. "This finger goes on this string, this finger goes here, this finger goes here..." . Work on your chords until you can play them cleanly without buzzes and rattles. Then, once you have those three chords semi-mastered, you can work on changes. Make a C chord. Strum it. Now make a D chord with your fingers. Strum it. Now, back to the C chord. Strum. Keep repeating this. Concentrate on playing cleanly and accurately. Go as slow as you need to to play accurately. Work SLOWLY. Speed will come later, with practice. With lots of time and repetition, eventually your hands will learn the chord shapes, and forming chords on the guitar will be 'automatic' and come without thinking. In addition to finger/muscle memory, you also have to develop some finger and wrist strength to finger chords and notes cleanly. Especially on acoustic guitar. This will also come over time, with practice. Try to practice every day or nearly every day. I'd try to practice at least 20 minutes a day but not more than an hour.
    1 point
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  12. I'd Do Anything For Love (But I Won't Do That) - Meat Loaf [video=youtube;9X_ViIPA-Gc]
    1 point
  13. "Who Do You Love?" - George Thorogood
    1 point
  14. "Love Me Do" - The Beatles Back to "do"?
    1 point
  15. "Do Wah Diddy Diddy" - Manfred Mann Here it is in the movie "Stripes"
    1 point
  16. De Do Do Do, De Da Da Da - The Police
    1 point
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