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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/16/2018 in all areas

  1. I'm aware that Fender already makes a baritone Tele, but for me its string length isn't long enough. I decided instead to go with a Warmoth baritone neck -- 28-5/8" string length. That's getting down into bass guitar territory. The neck wasn't cheap -- with all the extras I wanted (ebony fingerboard, compound radius, 24 frets, etc.) it came up to $350 just for the neck. For a body I located a "loaded" Squier Affinity Tele body on eBay and went with that. Since the body was "loaded," the only other items I needed were tuners and string trees. I installed two trees because of the pitch I'd be tuning the strings to. Currently, I have it tuned down to a low A -- so A D G C E A, using Ernie Balls that are like 12-65s, as I dimly recall. I could probably use slightly larger bass strings because they aren't quite as tight as I'd prefer, but the guitar does sound good tuned down this low. I especially like the spank I get with the bridge pickup playing the bottom strings. Here's a pic of the guitar. Nothing special looking. You can't even really tell that it's a baritone unless you were to put it up against a Tele with a normal string length, and then you'd see the neck is about 3" longer. [ATTACH=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"full","title":"baritele.jpg","data-attachmentid":32325409}[/ATTACH]
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  2. Looking at the results so far I have got the design team busy. The clean pedal is near production. For only $39.99 We guarantee that what comes out has exactly the same clarity, integrity and level as what goes in. Cleantone uses our new "direct wiring" technology between the input and the output and looks really cool! [ATTACH=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"full","title":"clean pedal.jpg","data-attachmentid":32342568}[/ATTACH]
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  3. Yes, having those additional bass strings can be disorienting. Especially with a guitar like a classical 10-string, where all 10 strings are fretted. Initially your hand wants to center itself on the fretboard -- when trying to play an open chord, like an E major for example. I can recall it taking me a couple of weeks of playing my first 10-string before I felt comfortable with it. Here's a pic of one of the 10-strings I built: JME in case by Michael McBroom, on Flickr
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  4. Had this little jewel a while back. Didn't take any overall pictures, I was mostly interested in documenting some setup stuff [ATTACH=JSON]{"data-align":"none","data-size":"full","title":"IMG_4476-1.jpg","data-attachmentid":32330152}[/ATTACH]
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  5. There. are some decent Ibanez models in that price range http://www.ibanez.com/usa/news/f_products/2013/AE/index.html
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  6. Used Eastman you can get for under a $1000 and they are solid wood not plywood.
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  7. Freeman, thanks for pointing me toward the D'Addario calcs. Shades of College Physics! It brings back vague memories of having to do just this sort of thing in that class taken lo these many moons ago. I have an interesting anecdote about this topic that I'll relate later. Well, it was an eye-opener running the calcs. The numbers I was getting seemed low initially -- until I compared them with what I was used to with a regular six-string. For example, with a 0.072" string and a 28.625" scale, the low A is coming in at a tension of 24.1 lb. Seems awfully low. So I tried 0.080", the biggest string D'Addario offers for guitar. It's tension was a little better -- 29.5 lb. I even tried a 0.085" bass string. It came in at a tension of 32.7 lb. But all of these numbers are way better than what I'm getting with my set of Ernie Ball Not Even Slinkys. That low A string has a whimpy 14.8 lb. No wonder it feels flappy. So, it seems there's no getting around it. Not much tension. But then, just out of curiosity, I took a look at the tension I'm getting with my typical low E at 0.046" -- and it comes in at a very flaccid 17.5 lb. So maybe a 0.072" diameter A string won't be so bad after all, with 10 more lb of force than what I'm used to with my low E on my regular electrics. I don't mind having stiff-feeling bass strings, as long as I can bend the top three without putting permanent grooves in my fingertips. Now for the anecdote: when I was taking my College Physics class, I was working part time in my friend's music store. One day, we got in a curious guitar. It was a 6-string Danelectro, but it had a really long string length for a guitar. I don't recall how long it was, but I do remember when my friend slapped a regular set of reasonably light strings on it. The result was they felt very tight, and were almost unbendable. That's when we checked out the scale and found out it was quite a bit longer than normal. It dawned on one of us that it may be a baritone guitar, and at that point, I flashed to a topic I'd studied recently in my physics class. Reasoning that here I was gonna get a chance to show off some of my book learning, I put pencil to paper and fingertips to calculator, and came up with some ballpark numbers we should look for for string gauges. Well, the guitar got shelved while my friend decided to do a bit of research, and the result was that, apparently Danelectro made a short-scale 6-string bass for a short while. So we kinda went "Oh, okay," and I just sorta watched all my cool calcs slip away. Oh well.
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