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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/30/2017 in all areas

  1. Glad it worked out for you. I'm also mystified how the guitar passed QC. I don't think any of my guitars have had fretwork that bad and that includes the Jay Turser Jay Jr. beater with bad intonation that sold for $50 brand new.
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  2. I Fall to Pieces - Patsy Cline [video=youtube;HG-8uZg2uV0]
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  3. "Let's Fall To Pieces Together" - George Strait
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  4. You can't buy Gibson stock. Gibson is a privately held company.
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  5. Several Species of Small Furry Animals Gathered Together in a Cave and Grooving with a Pict - Pink Floyd
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  6. We are safe and secure, we we're spared unlike so many others.
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  7. I followed your links, read the article - yes, important stuff. We've all had the experience probably of diving into the correction/editing tools only to come up for air two hours later with high blood pressure, saying "it would have just taken 15 minutes to re-track the @#$@ thing!" But the editing and correction tools suck you in, don't they? Just here, me and my mouse, we can fix almost anything, right? On the other hand, some of the correction tools have just become part of my standard practice. For example, I went a long time without the use of a good weighted MIDI keyboard and instead just had a little 37-key unweighted Novation keyboard that had such uneven and touchy response that there's no way to play any kind of subtle parts without the MIDI response being all over the place. Both timing and velocity just not consistent - what would be easy on a real piano is practically impossible on a such a keyboard. So I just got into the habit of laying down a keys part, then immediately quantizing and velocity-editing the part right off. I'd just compress the velocity between, say, 45 and 80 to get rid of all the velocity outliers and smooth it out. I'd nudge the entire recording to get rid of the 35-45 millisecond latency that I can't tweak out of my setup. I'd quantize section by section judiciously, avoiding the little runs and such that can't be quantized without ruining the feel. All this just to get around the limitations of an inexpensive keyboard - but it also effected my composing and playing style. I now immediately split my tracking between stuff I can just correct-edit into shape in a jiffy, and then the other stuff that has to be "as played, no editing" to work. I build a quantized and corrected skeleton first of all - simple chords and such. I like this way of working - I can slap down rhythm tracks really quick, sketch out a tune in no time, then go back through it all, replacing the parts one at a time with keepers. The other thing I do routinely that brings mass-editing/correction into my composition method, is, to create a click track of a tweaked groove with just the swing and feel that I want throughout the song. To make the overall track totally swing the way I want, I have no problem applying groove-quantization to midi parts to get it all together in fast order. On the other hand, I avoid the correction tools as much as possible on all the audio recording - vox, electric/acoustic guitars, etc. Melodyne's most valuable feature has been teaching me how to just sing really in tune - when it comes to these parts, I want the correction tools to work themselves out of a job. nat
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  8. Man, that was a rough storm. Finally saw daylight yesterday afternoon and was able to get some sleep last night. Your prayers all helped out, so thanks guys My neighborhood was spared being flooded. So many haven't been that lucky however. I'm likely taking in my nephew when he gets back in town. His house is on the edge of the flooding going on by those reservoir's. My wife is doing charity work at her church today and I opened up our office for those who can work. The owner is still flooded in. My company plays a huge role is servicing business equipment all over the state from Galveston to Dallas. I'll be up to my eyeballs helping get companies up and running after the storm. I'm sure the schools and government offices will need all kinds of help too. All companies and agencies are built around they're computing systems these days. Without them businesses cant operate. Wish I could have gotten out the word to people before the storm to have them at least remove they're hard drives and seal them in plastic waterproof bags. Getting a computer is relatively easy. Getting data off a submerged drive is difficult to impossible. All the people who need to get back to work need they're offices up and running just to get paid. I'm hoping our techs were spared flooding. The ones who have will be putting is long hours.
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  9. Lets Spend the Night Together - The Rolling Stones
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  10. To be fair, while the LS801p is an SPL monster, it is around 145lbs IIRC. I am still a fan of the PRX618/718/818 XLF subs. All of these have a really good sound to them and mate perfectly with your tops. I would personally prefer two (and actually do own 2 myself), but even one would be a nice add to your PA. Note, these subs only weigh 81 lbs. My 52 year old back can still lift one into the back of my SUV if needed
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  11. I have a completely different suggestion. Possibly THE best guitar I ever owned was a Guild Blues90. This is not the current Bluesbird with P90s that they sell. It is an entirely different guitar. Almost completely hollow body, but is a semi technically. Hot P90s, so you might want more traditional but I loved them. They were made in Westerly NJ, and stopped around 2000 I believe but you do find them. They are pre-Fender also. I have owned a real 1960 ES-335 (PAFS), Epi Dot, four Les Pauls with full size and mini HBs, more Telecasters than I can count, and the list goes on. Selling my P90 years ago is my biggest guitar sale regret. I still miss it. They go used for around $1000-1200 and are worth EVERY single penny. This picture isn't mine, but it looked just like this one. [ATTACH=CONFIG]n32049262[/ATTACH]
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  12. I have an older Fishman undersaddle pickup/ preamp and it sounds great and is the easiest for playing different venues. If the sound guys don't freak out at the request, I also usually run an octava condenser mic pointed up at the fretboard at around the 12th fret. I get the solid direct sound (processed with some reverb if I want) and have the mic for pic/ string noises and warmth. A good sound guy can blend them and get a great natural, full sound. Martin D35 and J40. PS. My tech guy advised to keep the Fishman I have because it sounds great and the Matrix sucks batteries big time.
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  13. Jeez, the article guy says, among all the rest of the useless complaining, that A circular control is extremely difficult to operate precisely with a mouse. Ok, class, can anyone tell the expert article-writer how to make fine adjustments, using a mouse, when dealing with a virtual knob? Anyone? Yes, Billy? Um, yeah, um you like move the mouse like down and keep going like? That's correct, Billy. Have you been using DAWs for a long time? Um, yes ma'am, my dad set me up with one about a month ago, so I got good at getting around it since then. I ain't no stoopid noob like the guy with the article. nat
    1 point
  14. Ahh so damn cute, Kinda like them little dogs women put in their purses, Just wanna kiss them and hug them, Not the dog you idiot! Got no use for an ankle biting POS,
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  15. Prayers and mojo to everyone affected.
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  16. I lived in Turkey for a couple years back in the mid '60s. One of their phrases I really like is "gecmis olsun" Folks think it means "get well soon" but I never like to learn a language that way, i.e. picking a convenient counter part in your own language, I prefer to learn the literal translations, which in this case it's much closer in meaning to "may it pass quickly" and therefore can be applied to a wide range of adversity, So a heart felt "Gecmis Olsun" to all in the area. Meanwhile, as long as your acoustic keeps working: [video=youtube;-ex-m-eEKsg]
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  18. From the description of the Ellipse Aura: The "Images" are designed to make your guitar sound like something else other than what's coming from the pickup. The idea is to find one that sounds like your guitar as if it were being miked. As for the K&K, I suspect the frequency response is closer to an unamplified guitar than an average undersaddle pickup.
    1 point
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