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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/21/2016 in all areas

  1. There is something about a band and vocalist recording at the same time. The energy passed back and forth, the interplay between the musicians and singers and other subtle things make for an excellent recording if done right. It's the way we used to do it, very retro. (1) learn your part before going into the studio so you can be a 'one take jake' (2) play it in front of an audience until you are comfortable with it, but not enough times so you are too comfortable with it (3) go in the studio, so everyone can see and hear everyone else, preferably at night (I think we play better at night) and have fun recording. It may not be sonic perfection, but it can be something that one-track-at a time cannot duplicate. Insights and incites by Notes
    2 points
  2. If the dimensions are not a problem with standard door frames, I'd just use a dolly. The larger wheels will move it more easily anyway
    1 point
  3. With a 3/8" case I would mount a caster board to the case for the wheels to attach too. As others said 3" or 4" casters if you are going to mount it to the case and I'd go all swivel. If you're only want 2" you might as well just buy a furniture dolly from home depot.
    1 point
  4. Thank you Mr Brown, Just as I thought, it's my first attempt and I didn't want to get it wrong.
    1 point
  5. As long as you dressed it well so it doesnt short to anything you are fine. Fwiw, in convensional terms the braid is the ground and thus the sheilding for the conductors. Heat shrink is insulation to prevent shorts.
    1 point
  6. We play 60's and 70's classic rock. This a retirement party for our singer who is retiring after 44 years of service at John Deere Tractors. The Supervisor's club it's a big wedding venue . I can relax.The sound company did provide the FOH speakers.The speakers were 4000 watts. The sound company provided subs and 32 channel mixer used 27 imputs miked all the drums and DI the guitars. The sound was on level four the whole concert. Plenty of power to fill the place which is 1/3 the size of a football field.
    1 point
  7. I can relax.The sound company did provide the FOH speakers.The speakers were 4000 watts on level four the whole concert. Plenty of power to fill the size of the venue which is the size of 1/3 the size of a football field.
    1 point
  8. -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Just in case anyone else has this problem and the thread is still relevant, I will add my 2 cents worth. The short is, I have done the repair and so far (1 hour) it is able to retain its memory for at least a 15 minute duration while turned off. Couple things I'd suggest: - There are small wire springs (sort of) that are under the top 2 screws. Notice there position. - The knob on the front that controls volume needs to be removed by pulling straight outward with pliers. This is part of what holds the board in when it feels like it should come out. - There are 2 small screws beside the MIDI insert that need to be removed. - The top board has all the inserts attached to it so you need to wiggle and kind of contort the plastic box in order to remove it. - I ended up un-soldering the battery holders from the board and then using sidecutters, remove the metal tabs from the old battery. I then tried to shape them back to their original shape (metal seems forgiving for being bent) and soldered them into their original holes on the board. -Take note of the polarity and put the holders in their correct holes This is where my fix may fail. I used electrical tape and simply wedged the battery between the clips and wrapped it. Not sure if the connection has enough "squeeze" on the battery and the longevity of the tape is also questionable. I don't feel soldering to the battery is an option That's all I can think of other then be quick on the soldering so the board doesn't get too hot. Thanks to Nick782 for his inspiration
    1 point
  9. Okay, I'm a VOX/Fender fan. I've always wanted a small headphone amp, but refused to pay the $40-50 Voc charges for their headphone amps. Well, caught the Night Train version last week on the Stupid Deal of the Day for $20, and it came in today. Gotta say that I am impressed. Great tones, 2 different channels, and quite a bit of control. Wish it had a reverb, but now I'm getting greedy. Sounded great through my earbud headphones. Really nice to keep in my guitar case. Easy, and quiet jamming, even while my kids are asleep!
    1 point
  10. Some with recording with a DAW, but in a big big way with synthesizers. That would be great. I miss recordings that feature musicians playing, musicians going for it during a recording. I'll hear these pop or rock songs in a gym, and I'll sometimes think, "Okay, this is really catchy. I might actually like it if I could hear musicians playing." Hearing someone's DAW playing just doesn't have that same feel.
    1 point
  11. Me, too. I use a console when I record, even when recording into a DAW. Mostly I use the computer as a recorder, an editor, and occasionally a signal processor. For me, a console is much quicker to work with than fooling with an on-screen mixer. On the few occasions where I've had a console that can control a DAW mixer, whenever I've tried that, I always get distracted by looking at the computer screen to make sure I'm doing the right thing. It never seems to be becoming second nature to me to ignore a computer screen if there's one there. As long as I get to make that decision. A DAW (assuming with the right hardware) can give me six stereo headphone mixes, so I can satisfy everyone in the band who wants something different - if we want to spend a couple of hours just fooling with a headphone mix. With the console, I'll offer them two independent mono mixes or the control room mix in stereo. I don't have the kind of clients who won't work with one of those choices. McCartney's good enough to be able to do that. A guy who's a bank clerk by day and by nigit is a drummer who plays guitar, bass, sax, harmonica, trumpet, sings, and writes songs can do it too, but probably not very well, and not very efficiently. He's best to just do the whole project himself. Either he'll get better at it or he'll figure out that he really makes better music when he's playing in a band. I read an article in Recording a couple of months back about how to put some life into programmed drums. Geez, he works really hard at it. He really understands what makes good drumming (which this old time banjo player has no clue about) and hand picks every sound from several different sets, using a few different drum programs - and that's just for one song. I think the point of that article is that today there's a wide choice of sampled drum sounds that are very well recorded and very well played, and that you don't need a great studio to get good drum sounds. But you still need to be able to think like a drummer plays and manually tweak every hit to make it sound like it was played, not just copied and pasted.
    1 point
  12. Just curious, has anyone ever tried to use one of these headphone amps as a line out to a PA system or the like? If so how do they sound? Our band uses a Jam Hub for practice & this could be a good way to avoid carrying an amp with a headphone out to or rehearsals. BTW- I have the "big brother" version of this amp (NT15C1-CL). GC's website currently lists it at $699 but when I was at a local store last summer I saw it tagged for 399. For the $ I was impressed enough to bring it to the register. When the sales clerk rung it up he informed me they were offering an additional 15% off on it so I happily waked out the door with it & a receipt for $339 + tax. I don't know if there was an error in the pricing but I'm happy with the purchase...
    1 point
  13. I'm watching this for more info. I think this is what I'm looking for. I do acoustic shows in the summer time, and it bothers me that it keeps me off of my Harley. I want to find a portable PA like this, and a short scale guitar that I can strap to the back of the bike, and take it to gigs. I'm hoping I can see this in person soon, and check it out.
    1 point
  14. Lately I've been playing my LP and LP type guitars through my Carvin X100b head and Carvin V3 cab with V30's. I use a Line 6 Pod XT Live for effects only and midi switching. I use a Voodoo Lab control switcher to allow me to switch the channels, effects loop, reverb, and boost for the x100b with the midi of the L6 Podxtl.
    1 point
  15. I see it. Since I've posted about this, I've been using a DRRI for home and live use. At home, I mostly play straight in clean, and live I use effects more sparingly. I use a rat for the heavier stuff because the drri is a loud amp for the bars we play in. But even with rat, I don't have the drive set high, and I get a great crunch and still retain many of the characteristics, tone, and feel of my amp and guitars. Every show. Someone's coming up to me to see what I'm using, and when they see that all the settings on my pedals aren't doing the heavy lifting, they're amazed. The DRRI is a great amp.
    1 point
  16. another proof why i can't stand metallica and hammet, ulrich and co... you all should have quit after the black album....
    1 point
  17. Hey guys - There is hope. The Zoom MRT3 (B for Black) absolutely has an internal battery back up for User patterns, songs etc. I just changed my battery out last week after having the same exact "Init?" code and all same problems described in this forum. However - you need to take out BOTH PC boards in order to get to it. The battery is on the PC board closest to the pad buttons - which is under the 2nd PC board and furthest away from you when the unit is upside down after removing the back cover. The battery is a standard CR2032 which is available at most drug stores or Radio Shack for $5- $6. The battery is typically soldered or tack welded to clips holding the terminals to the PC board. You can either try to "unsolder" the clips from the battery and install a new battery. Just be careful not overheat when trying to remove! Or you can do what I did which was- simply buy a replacement battery holder from Radio Shack ($1.50), remove the old clips (2 solder joints) and solder the new battery holder onto the PC board (2 solder joints). Then you can easily swap out batteries in the future if the need ever arises again. I bought my MRT3B new and used it for about 10 years before the battery needed to be changed. http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=3060977 Done. Piece of cake and works great. One small snag is that when the new battery holder was soldered in, it hung off the PC board a little bit and rubbed against one of the ribs on the plastic frame/body inside the MRT3. I simply shaved down the plastic rib with a razor knife to make a little room. Now it fits and works great. This may be my first Forum post ever? Figured, I actually had something useful to contribute. Good luck
    1 point
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