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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/18/2014 in all areas

  1. Sad to hear that. I knew he was having health problem and was surprised he had been touring in Europe, even though he wasn't able to stand and play any more from previous hip injuries. I heard many say his health wasn't good and if you had the opportunity to see him, do it soon. I was a big fan of his growing up and have the opportunity to see him play live at least a dozen times, including the early days with Derringer and Edgar. What really brought home to me that he was aging was a Blues Training video he had done. I could barely recognize him as being the same man I had seen 20 years earlier. I read he had been regaining allot of his stamina back but he was always a very thin man and had a hard time trying to get him to put weight on. I never felt he got the recognition he should have as a player. Maybe he will get it now as so many of the greats do when they are no longer around to give us great music.
    2 points
  2. Fell off the GAS wagon. Link - Epi "1966" G-400 Pro SG in TV Silver, closeout @ $220 while supplies last. In for the SG; amazing deal for $240 w/tax. For a bit more distinctive(/vintage?) look beyond the basic black-on-silver, I'm going with a pickguard replacement to something like black pearl, silver pearl, black paisley, red (or brown) tortoise, etc. (Opinions?) Rosewood with the trapezoid fret markers helps. I may swap the tuners out for a more vintage looking set. And a Tusq nut swap, because 90% of tuning issues in inexpensive guitars are improved with a good replacement nut that doesn't require constant lubrication. Epi says that the pickups are the relatively new Alnico Classic Pro set that they've been including in their ES 339 Pro (as hopefully distinct from the older muddy, sloppy, aggressively bland Epi Alnico Classic set that came in my Dot Deluxe) for a couple of years. I've played a few of those 339s, and the pickups are much better than any other Epiphone I've ever played. It's almost like they might just stay in the guitar, despite my longstanding trend of always upgrading pickups. The 339 / SG's 4-knob, 2-switch electronics allow independent coil switching and adjustment, making "split" single coil tones available on the neck and bridge pickups independently and in any single coil/humbucker/tone/volume combination. I have this same setup on another guitar (Ibanez SZ520 with Dimarzio Bluesbucker(n) and Air Zone(b) pickups) and it is extremely versatile. Especially so when using the neck in humbucker mode and the bridge split to single coil: you have a nice warm neck tone, a sweet, clear bridge tone for excellent rhythm, and an almost acoustic middle position with the volume backed off. Then, with a push of a knob (switching the bridge to humbucking mode) you get a fat, powerful lead tone from the bridge. You can do a similar trick with the neck to add a clear, Tele flavored tone on top of the mix. This SG should be even more adaptable than my SZ520, because it has independent vol/tone controls per pickup, whereas the pickups in my "HB switching" Ibanez share one set of vol/tone controls. On the other hand, if the stock pickups don't work out, I'm probably going to swap them out with the beautiful Seth Lovers I have in my Dot, and then sell the Dot. [edit] Or crap, I might decide to go dual humbucker-sized P90s, like Rose Black Velvets or Tonerider Rebel 90s. Maybe Phat Cats with a magnet swap. ______ Spoke with GC and the deal (along with the Brendan Small Explorer is for new but discontinued-from-stock guitars, so it's until the stock runs out. Still good at 10:30pm on Friday 7-17.
    1 point
  3. Thanks! You know I'm not the best with the tech side of recording but I'll tell you what I know. Guitars, bass, and main vocal were done at one time. Percussion was added next. With one room and no great way to do isolation it's easier to do it this way and gives the engineer more control instead of worrying about bleed. Harmony vocals were done next. He had what he called a stereo set up. Two mics on top of each other with one rotated around. They each pick up in a figure 8 pattern so you get a stereo picture of whats happening in the room. It was cool. The peeps actually stood where we wanted them to be in the mix. It was recorded in Cubase and then mixed through an analog board. Not sure what kind it is. Apparently its from the early 90s, there were only 5 of them made, this one has been modded, and I don't want to know how much they payed for it. Hearing with and without, it adds alot of depth to the tracks. It is a commercial facility that some friends of mine run, part of a music co-op sort of thing. There are some limitations that come with the space, but they're giving me really good rates so I'm going to stick with them. That's a song I wrote. I got family that still farms cane. As a kid going to back to my moms home town, White Castle, LA. I always looked forward to getting some sugar cane. During harvest time the highways are literally littered with it. As you were driving along, you can stop and pick some up. EDIT: I'll be posting a song a week leading up to release on the facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/ryanharrisandco
    1 point
  4. I'll throw a second recommendation at the Soul Food. I got one about a month ago and I've been very impressed. it's very versatile - it can be a clean boost, a light overdrive, or a smooth distortion. What's great about the Soul Food is that the you can adjust the "drive" independently of the volume, Even with the drive turned all the way down (clean) there's still plenty of volume/boost on tap. Less than $70 new and it will come with a power supply. By the way, ANY distortion, overdrive or fuzz pedal will compress the signal, that is the nature of distortion boxes.
    1 point
  5. oh, and a new studio release for rhino. A different sound than the last release. I've been doing alot of sets as of late with this type of line up. It's so much easier than coordinating an 8 piece band and having to do arrangements. Already have another batch of songs lined up to start on as soon as this one comes out next month. Here's a sample
    1 point
  6. A real loss, while known, perhaps not as known as he should have been. Peace to him and his loved ones.
    1 point
  7. His intro to "It's My Own Fault" is like the distilled essence of classic major-minor blues, the BB King knob turned way up. One of the 20 greatest blues intros of all time, IMHO. Hell, what I am I saying? The whole damned song is brilliant, not just the intro. Johnny was a legit hardcore blues machine, a well-studied master. Listening to his beautiful "Life is Hard". [video=youtube;gS7jRkeAz_c]
    1 point
  8. Nice looking guitar, and 130$ off what it was is pretty good!
    1 point
  9. I'll offer this up in light of todays news. [video=youtube;8Tyg5SJDpiQ]
    1 point
  10. I loved the guy. Don't know how many hours I've spent listening to his music and trying to learn some of his licks. The album he produced for Muddy Waters is a classic, as well as several of his own, "Johnny Winters And", a live album is a scorcher. His cover versions of "Johnny B Goode", "Jumpin Jack Flash", and "Highway 61 Revisited" I'd put up against anyones cover of anything. He was, in my opinion, the Lord High Priest of the Gibson Firebird. Nobody played it or got a better sound out of it than he did. God Bless him...Sorry we've lost him but glad the incredible pains he suffered are at an end.
    1 point
  11. I put on "Saints and Sinners."
    1 point
  12. Ouch! Saw him a few times live. We say it a lot but honestly.. a true inspiration for me. Just made me want to pick up my guitar and play raw bluesy stuff. Thanks JW!
    1 point
  13. Ahhhhh dammit. Johnny was undeniably one of the best, most potent, ass-kicking blues gunslingers the state of Texas ever produced. RIP Johnny. You rocked the living hell out of us while you were here. [video=youtube;VqXYuWOoBl4]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VqXYuWOoBl4 [video=youtube;9srJIjp55Bs]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9srJIjp55Bs
    1 point
  14. I saw him 2x.. late 1970's and early 1980's HE KICKED ASS!!! RIP
    1 point
  15. One of the few white guys who could really play and sing the blues. RIP.
    1 point
  16. From a guitar builders perspective, they are simply works of art, so I can only reply hot. However I can understand them not being to everybodies taste.
    1 point
  17. I like good movies, and dislike bad movies. Unless they're really really *really* bad, in which case I may enjoy them nonetheless.
    1 point
  18. Also----if you're just listening through the TV speakers, make sure you don't have the audio set for "wide" or one of the other signal-processed settings. Those can sometimes result in the dialogue getting buried.
    1 point
  19. didn't mention which models. Different models by different manufacturers can be very different. I suggest you visit the manufacturers sites and read through the forums. If you read enough you can usually spot the model amps that suck and also get a feeling for how well the manufacturer supports their customers. I was just breezing the TC site and saw dozens of service issues and out of the box failures. This may be typical on a manufacturers forum because the people who do go there are usually looking for help, but if you see 50 posts on one particular model and everyone there is having the same issue, it may be a good reason to steer away from that model. You can also just Google something like "problem with such and suck head and you can often find the people who have had problems. We are often too eager to spend our money and don't look for faults until they occur. Unfortunately that is usually after we bought something and a warrantee has run out. If you are changing countries as you said, another concern might be getting it repaired if it does developed issues. Models sold in that country may have local repair. If not, you have to ship it and deal with all those costs. I buy allot of used gear. I'm an electronic tech so I'm not too concerned about restoration and repairs because I do that myself so long as the gear is simple enough and isn't loaded with proprietary parts. I can buy standard tubes transistors and op amps anyplace. When you get into some high tech stuff, the parts are only available through that manufacturer and they got you by the ass for parts price and repair costs. The other thing is resale value.. Something super new wont have any used ones being sold unless its a real dud then you find EBay loaded with people trying to dump them on someone else. If you find a bunch of bad ones being sold its a sign they were too expensive to repair so again, its something to stay away from.. Your big names usually have their quality control in good shape and have good support too. They make so many you can usually find what you need with few issues. Time is the true test though. When I buy say a tube amp, It may have the same design as an amp built 60 years ago and so long as quality parts are used the amp can last a lifetime. You just have to be sure you want to live with that tone for the rest of your life. I'm not a big fan of built in effects, tuners and all that stuff. A tuner costs maybe $10 and they tag on $100 for that feature because its built in. Same deal for effects. The quality of built in effects usually isn't that great and all it does is compromise the heads durability because there's more parts and more chances of failures. Other then maybe a built in compressor or limiter, Bass amps have no need for effects. Everything else is either personal preference.. Cost, The instrument being used, The kind of music you play, Weight, Tone, Headroom, are a few. If you already have a cab, matching the head to the cab to get the best results can be a factor. How it looks to impress others may be your thing, and how well its built for road work may trump something good for studio work. No one can tell you what you need to buy, especially today where there are thousands of choices and comparable models. With all these factors involved, unless you get real specific on what you want or need, you can have as many opinions thrown at you as there are pieces of gear available. You can find the biggest piece of crap amp out there and you'll find someone who think its the greatest thing made. The way I check out gear is I do allot of open mic nights. I get to hear bands playing through gear from the audience then get to try it first hand playing on stage. Believe me, I've had plenty of surprising disappointments playing through gear I thought might be good. In other cases Something relatively inexpensive may be more then enough.
    1 point
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