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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/05/2014 in all areas

  1. Stab in the dark but when I use .009's I swap out the B string, which is usually a .011, for a .012. Possibly he does something similar with Ernie Ball .010's?
    1 point
  2. Last Saturday was our first gig since October without the full line up. Our singer Ashley had a preplanned vacation and the band started talking about subbing someone in her space for two shows. I was like 'whaaaaaaaaaaaaaat????" After all of the pain a misery of using sub singers last year, why as a band would we even consider a sub on stage. We have two dynamic lead singers and a third (our bass player (who sings terrific lead. Now there was legitimate concerns about JD straining his voice. Mind you he's a vocalist... he does this for a living and belting out 3 hours of songs isn't doing his instrument much justice. The other concern was so many areas where Ashley's sings, intergrated within medleys. I assure the band we would be better off, leaving out material, and adding old or new material than rehearsing with a sub. To start it would even be hard to find someone who could sing and project like Ashley in the first place. The band agreed (I thought this would be common sense) and we dedicated two rehearsals to some old favorites and new songs. Came off without a hitch ... The goal going forward is to have alternate setlists where JD or Ashley could fill solo if we were down a singer for any reason (cold, committment, emergency).
    1 point
  3. Well, there ya go. You get whatcha pay for. But---it seems to me anyway---that with the market being what it is and it being so over-saturated with bands that everyone is working for $300 a night these days, that clubs wouldn't have to work that hard to find good live music. Even on miniscule budgets. It's that "bunch of friends coming" deal that's probably killing things. Venues need to have their own clientele. Their reputations depend on it. You'd think in the day and age of Yelp and all that no one would want to risk a bad review simply because they let some crappy band play so they could sell some beers to the bands' friends. Wouldn't you rather be the place where people say "well, I don't know who's playing tonight, but they usually have someone pretty good, so let's go check it out...."? But obviously many think otherwise.
    1 point
  4. Here's proof it's doable. [video=youtube;J8XWnkK8aKQ]
    1 point
  5. Electronics work is relatively easy. I taught myself to swap pickups and build wiring harnesses. You need a good soldering iron (about 40 watts).
    1 point
  6. ^^^^^^^^^^ I agree with wankdeplank, I've never played a cleaner guitar than my Poplar Strat. It's like the tone has been sanitized or something, hard to explain. Sustains forever too but does lack complexity compared to Alder. I love it though.
    1 point
  7. I've been neglecting the HC community of late, not so much as through choice but because of over commitment. My little Youtube experiment went a little nuts. Anyway, I always liked it here, more so than anywhere else than I can think of so I'm going to be back to contribute as much as I can or as much as you will stand - or not. Anyway... again... a best mate and I have started this new channel, just for fun. We'll keep it informal and steer away from the usual. I hope. Here's a couple of samples. Our only two contributions to date. Hope you like 'em. Wait... it looks like I can only post one. Damn. The second episode is at and features the Boss BF-1. Ep 3., yet to go live, features the Roland Double Beat AD-50. Get the idea?
    1 point
  8. This was going to be my suggestion. You might want to try flatwound strings too if you're looking for less overtones... but in general, if you can hear something (and assuming the noise floor of the room is low enough to let you capture it without it being masked by noise) and you like the way it sounds, then IMHO, the best thing to do is to mic it up. In general, a mic and decent playback system will do a much better job of accurately capturing and reproducing the sound as your ears hear it than any magnetic or piezo pickup and guitar amp will.
    1 point
  9. I remember this all starting up in the mid-90s. It was the first time I ever heard the term "weekend warrior" and it was at a local music store who was promoting a program where they'd sell some old guys some gear, maybe give them some lessons, and help them hook up with each other to start bands. Sort of a "School of Rock" for old dudes. Made sense from the store's perspective since these children-of-the-60s were just now reaching 40-50 and had some extra time and spending cash. Instead of spending money on a boat or a sports car, guys were starting to live out their mid-life crises by buying a couple of expensive guitars and amps and learning some old Cream riffs. There were even some gigs to get for the motivated that didn't completely suck since "classic rock" was really starting to take off right at this time as well. (Didn't hurt that every old album ever released was being "remastered" for CD right around then too.) There have always been older musicians. But most, in my experience, were all either former full-time pros or never stopped being working pros. They may or may not have been playing in bands that were relevant to younger audiences (most weren't) but very few sucked and they usually got some respect from younger players, if nothing else. No one ever thought of those older band as "dad bands". They were just older dudes still playing Big Band music or maybe 50s rock or in an Oompa band or something. Most were pretty damn good. At least in the cities I lived in. But I don't recall many who never did much with it when they younger and who just decided to take up being in a band when they got into their 40s or 50s until the 90s. So, yeah...I do think that's where the (usually derisive) term "dad band" comes from.
    1 point
  10. I just bit on this. Soldano Hot Rod 50 Avenger $1176... seems to be normally over $2K http://www.musiciansfriend.com/amplifiers-effects/soldano-hot-rod-50-avenger-50w-tube-guitar-amp-head
    1 point
  11. Uh... YES! If we can convince my wife... I'd do it in a heartbeat.
    1 point
  12. This song has a lot going for it. There are some very cool lyrical/story ideas here. That said, I think you're kind of writing the wrong song. The Superman conceit is quite good as a start, but I think you should only use that in the first verse because to me it starts wandering off in too many directions: the "spandex allergy," and "something funky in my biology" bits don't work for me. And I would drop the "I-can-bend-steel-with-my-bare-hands" brag entirely. I would title the song "My Bare Hands." Make it a simple story about a man who works for a living, or about a musician, like yourself, whose father and grandfather and all his great, great grandfathers worked with their hands: carpenters, farmers, and blacksmiths. So there's a working history in this guy's bare hands, there's something solid and country about that. And it should also be something that makes the girl feel like being his girl because his hands are both strong and gentle. You wouldn't want to say that directly, but I think that's what the song should be about. You have the start of something that could really be great.
    1 point
  13. I admire the drive grant and dave have to keep the show going. Its tough to have gigs and no fronts. Music hits the skids around here till summer. I am enjoying some down time. The sailboats back in the water with fresh bottom paint. Have a few odds and ends to tidy up on teak that can all be done aboard. This is going to be a good summer. I plan to spend a lot of time on the water and less playing in bars. I want to do a few more things.
    1 point
  14. wg3 - that delusional singer is probably not actually delusional. I suspect he's actually so horribly bad that he does not yet have the knowledge based required to be able to properly estimate his own skillset.
    1 point
  15. True but their live albums and shows don't. They just turn up louder and let the hall/room reverb fill the void. The musical arrangement is the big deal. Listen to someone like Buddy Holly and hear how he fills that void with his leads. The drums and bass also have to know how to ham it up and support you. If they are weak in playing in a three piece I can guarantee you that's where you're hole is. A Bass and Drums got to be super tight and kick butt and to sound as tight as a complete band on their own. If they cant work together, then any time you switch parts your going to have the bottom drop out. What I'd do is have them play their parts together without your part. If they cant make it sound like a wall of sound as a duo then you know that bond is a weakness. Often times a drummer will latch on to the guitarist instead of the bassist, or you'll have a weak bassist that falls apart without your chords to lead them along like a leash. They are just weal players and having another player isn't going to make them stronger. They just need to step up and take a bigger role in the music and learn their material better. If anyone cant play the entire song through solo, then you have an interdependent relationship going on that's unhealthy. If you want to be in a three piece then there's no room for hiding behind others so you can sit back there and take it easy screwing off in the shadows. You got to be confident and up front all the way, and that means knowing your parts. Then when you go to solo, the bass and drums work as a backup to fill that hole. A drummer will switch to a louder ride cymbal and make some noise where that rhythm part used to be so there isn't such a big hole. 3 piece isn't easy. I've done it all my life on and off. I choose material that lest be make those transitions easy and I make sure my guys step up and back me.
    1 point
  16. The only offers I get are in no way related to my listing. I don't even bother any more.
    1 point
  17. Looks like a raccoon with the mange to me.
    1 point
  18. I couldn't find my screen shots so I just redid them and uploaded them to drop box. I'm not sure pictures upload properly so I'll post the links to the pics as well as attempt to put the pics up. I recorded the tracks containing about 60 seconds of chords up and down the neck including the root position using my telecaster. The only processing done to the waveforms was to match the signal gains so when the frequency analyzer scanned the wave files it saw similar gain structures. I recorded three tracks. 1st was from the guitar pickups recorded direct. 2nd used a piezo contact mic first connected to the headstock and then to the bridge itself. 3rd I used a flat frequency condenser mic set about 2' from the guitar. This is the guitar pickups. You can see how the lows and highs roll off quite steeply. I did record the pickups through a preamp because I was pressed for time this morning so there may be a bit more high and low end roll off than recording straight in but its good enough for government work. https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/...p%20Guitar.jpg This is the contact mic. You can see it produces a good mass and treble response which gives it that wider range acoustic tone. The big bass peak is the resonant tone of the wood. All chunks of wood have some kind of resonant tone just like a speaker cab, room full of sound etc. Waveforms vary in size and no two guitars are identical because no two pieces of wood are identical. https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/...o%20Guitar.jpg Here is the miced guitar. You can see the increased treble response and weak bass. This is a Tele guitar and thy do produce allot of metallic tones played acoustically. https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/...d%20Guitar.jpg Here's the comparisons. You can see there are certain peaks that match between them or at least line up where they do occur. How large those peaks are is dependent on how much of those frequencies the three different recording devices captured, but they all do align with the instruments signature tone. Piezo Top wave, Mic bottom. https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/...d%20Bottom.jpg Piezp top, Pickup Bottom, https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/...p%20Bottom.jpg Mic top Pickup Bottom https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/...p%20Bottom.jpg One thing to note. With the use of an EQ, you can manipulate the frequency response to sound similar to the others. People into recording like myself do this all the time. Its not going to match 100% for a number of reasons. Dynamic response is a big factor. If you compare the pickup response to the others, you see the peaks are much smaller. This is mainly due to the inductive effects of the pickups coils compressing the peaks quite a bit. If you were to use an expander which works opposite of a compressor, the dynamic peaks would more closely mimic the responses of the Piezo and Miced waves. I do have a DBX expander used for dolby decoding at home. I've used it on my live rig to expand dynamics with good results. I may have to try it recording and post the results here. I also have an Alesis High Frequency Exciter that takes generates high frequency overtones from the fundamental waveforms which might make up for the pickups roll off at higher frequencies and generate some higher fidelity frequencies you hear coming from the guitar. Between the two it might produce some interesting results. The Piezo and miced signal will vary quite a bit depending on where the mic is placed or where the piezo contact mic sits on the guitar. The fundamental peaks usually wind up in the same places because the strings produce those same tones in all cases, but the overall size of those peaks and overtone elements can be amplified/EQed by the response of those devices. For actual wood tone and what the guitarist feels with the instrument in his hands, the Piezo pickup generates a very accurate wood tone response. There is no air between the Piezo and body to influence the sound and the vibrations are converted directly into a signal. For what the ears "Hear" without feeling the instrument, the Miced instrument will be the most accurate. It will capture the room acoustics and you're really need a good stereo mic placed where your head is to get the most accurate response. Stereo reflections do color the sound using phase cancellations and summations to make some frequencies stringer and others weaker. The pickup and Guitar amp do very well reproducing the guitars response where it counts which is the key item. Guitar is a midrange instrument that has a specific frequency range. When its played with other instruments it sits in a specific frequency range which also includes the ears most sensitive range of 1~2Khz. The changes you make on an electric to change the tone are often very small, much smaller than many realize unless they have viewed those changes on a frequency analyzer. Because the ears are so sensitive in those ranges the hearing perception sees those changes as being big. An electric doesn't fill the entire frequency range as the screen shots show. You wouldn't want them too. The frequencies above and below are reserved for other instruments like Bass Kick, Cymbals, Snare, Vocals etc. Its the combination of all those instruments in proper proportions that make up both a live and recorded mix. If you want a wide ranges acoustic tone, then an actual Acoustic guitar fits that bill. Its bass and treble response is much wider than an electric and it does well filling in for other missing instruments when recorded solo. So, as a summary. As I said before, If you take the frequency response of the Guitar pickup that's shaped like a mountain in the mid frequencies and use a graphic EQ with the sliders set up like a smiley face, boosted highs/lows, and mids reduced, you can mimic the Mic and Piezo frequencies to some extent. An EQ wont generate harmonics or wood tone if the pickup fails to pick them up through the strings, and it cant do anything but boost noise above the pickups maximum frequency response which is usually in the 6~7K range max. Same thing with the guitar amps EQ and speakers. Its not High fidelity so you'd going to have allot of that response missing. If I get a chance I'll post some frequency responses of different guitar amps as well. Different heads, speakers, cabs boost of reduce the frequency response of the signals. The signature peaks of the guitar again do remain intact. This is why we can hear the difference between different guitars like a Tele, Les Paul, etc. Lastly, when you gain any guitar up, the signature peaks that make that instrument sound unique become less and less. Once the peaks become completely flat its nearly impossible to hear the difference between one guitar and another. you may be able to make out some pinch tones or dynamic response when the signal goes from zero to max, but the peaks are so compressed and flat your ears cant make out the difference in wood types. This is all cools stuff just about anyone can test for themselves. Just get a 1/4" to 1/8" adaptor and plug your guitar into the sound card, then download a free recording software package. You can also download free analyzers for testing.
    1 point
  19. For me it's two MIM Strats with GFS vintage alnico pickups, an MIM telecaster with Tonerider pickups, and an SX ash contoured telecaster body with an MIJ fender telecaster neck with a P-90 in the neck and an GFS overwound fatbody in the neck. I run these straight into a Fender Cyber Twin (original, not SE) which I set on 66Super Reverb for Blackface and 60Bandmaster for Tweed. Not gigging - just rockin' out in the living room.
    1 point
  20. assume you've tried mic'ing up your unplugged electric guitar? i did that once with a Gretsch falcon in a studio.. although that is a big hollowbody. but maybe look at trying out some big jazz hollow body guitars?
    1 point
  21. If I'm doing a solo act, I just keep going. If I'm in a band, I point at the drummer.
    1 point
  22. Sounds tough. I just hired a guy I've never met to do a gig next month. No audition. I haven't even heard him play. But my band mate heard him, and said he's good. I offered him an equal split for the gig, which is five bills a man. I've sent him our cd, and a list of a few covers. Might try to have a rehearsal because we are subbing another player too. So, two of the four of us will be new. I'm not nervous about it because I know the sub, and he's great. The new guy is a full time player so I'm expecting him to bring it. I'm glad I'm not looking for a front person-way harder to find.
    1 point
  23. Yeah, I know what you mean. I write best late at night but my neighbor is on shifts so I too am used to unplugged. The pickups are not part of that equation, it is effectively an acoustic without a sound box. I think you will have to mike it. Maybe try taping a small mic to the top of the body. Pick noise may be an issue if you use a mic. If you try to get that sound through pickups it will have to be one bridge single coil (no 2-4 phase or HB with acoustic) treble right up and the rest right down and volume quite low. Like turn it down till it matches the unplugged sound level, record it and see what it sound like without you playing at the same time. ps This is an electric guitar forum, writing about playing unplugged guitars is pushing your luck with the new regime
    1 point
  24. Yeah, there's not much at all that's fun about the audition process. Least of all having to tell everyone you didn't hire that they didn't get the job. About the best thing I can think of to do in that case is impress upon people how many are auditioning for the position (even to the point of exaggerating how many have tried out for the spot) so that they go into it figuring it's a long shot for them. As far as hiring singers goes? We're in the process of looking for a new singer as we speak. With Tiffany leaving the band, we've got some pretty big pumps to fill so we're auditioning more candidates and looking farther and wider than we might otherwise. I see the requirements for the job as being a 3-legged stool: it's gotta be someone with the Right Voice, the Right Look (actual beauty being just one part of overall charisma and stage presence, re: Janis Joplin) and the Right Attitude (gotta be someone who fits in with everyone personally--especially with the other singer.) I'm sure I'll have some interesting stories when all is said and done. The process is always amusing, if nothing else. Already I'm annoyed by the fact that even though I specifically say you need either a video clip or a photo & audio clip to be considered for audition, so many girls have answered the ad with neither. And then there are the ones who clearly can't sing their way out of a paper bag for whom I have to come up with a reason to say they don't get to even audition. (Usually they get told "sorry, but we already found the right person" or "I just don't think you're ready for this yet.") Some of the girls we will be auditioning I'm already 90% sure aren't going to be right for one reason or another, but I still want to hear them 'live' just in case I'm wrong or if I think there might be some use for them in the future --- maybe they don't have the right look, but they sing really well and live locally and might be good to have in the pocket in case we need a quick sub. Others I'm pretty sure aren't going to be right, but they were so persistent about wanting to audition that I'd just feel too guilty to cut them loose without at least giving them the opportunity to sing for us. Also, 'local' girls get an edge up. I like to know who all the local talent is as much as possible, and someone who lives closer and we can work and rehearse with more often who might not have 'the' best voice might be a better choice than an absolute powerhouse who lives 200 miles away. I've already got one of those anyway.
    1 point
  25. Blue.... nearly identical story. Last March when we were audtioning for a new drummer we had 3 candidates considered. One guy was local, a decent guy, older... powerhouse rock drummer back in the day. We all knew he probably wasn't the guy but we wanted to give him a shot. Drummer #2 was a 21 year old girl who was up and coming having played in original only bands. #3 was a drummer referred to us who lived 90 minutes away (strike one), who had played in several successful bands each measuring a year at best (strike 2) and we had been pre-warned he was a bit of a bull (strike 3). So all three auditioned... guess who was best prepared with the audition material. Yup... the girl. In less than a week she learned everything that was asked of her. The local guy muddled through the medley and the guy from 90 minutes away didn't even learn the medley... instead he offered to jam on some songs he already knew. Who was the strongest of the three.... #3.... a terrific drummer and he could sing lead. Who did we choose... drummer #2. She learned exactly what was asked and said thank you at the end of her audition. When drummer #3 found out that he didn't get the job...AND he lost out to a 21 year old girl he went ballistic....first begging us to reconsider. Then getting belligerent accusing us of hiring her b/c she was eye candy for the crowd. There may have been a little truth in that but honestly I credit her with keeping my previous band together long enough to rebirth this new band. She always worked hard, always showed up on time, never complained and did exactly what she was hired to do. She brought less drama than some of the men in the band. Although we knew we would have her at most for a year (she's in LA now backing basssist/singer Nik West) she was the lynch pin the kept nus performing shows ever though we weren't sure of a future. The other guy is still running his mouth a bit... and he's on his 3rd band since that audition.
    1 point
  26. In a band where I drum, we're looking for a rhythm guitarist with good harmony abilities. It's VERY, very frustrating when we present a high-energy party rock band geared towards the dancing bar girls, and we stress image. The guys walking in with the grandpa jeans or the "Hey, so do you do any Beatles?" mindset makes me question whether A) these guys clicked on any of the links or B) if the guy in the band setting up the audition clicked on any of their links. On the plus side, I like being in a band where all I have to do is drum! Have at it, band leader!
    1 point
  27. I hate auditions. Years ago, we were looking for a replacement keyboard player. A guy we knew heard about it. I heard him at some jams; he was adequate but not good and I didn't think he could keep up. Plus, we were doing a lot of out of town stuff on weekends an he ran an organic produce stand that did the bulk of their business on weekends. He kept asking if he could audition, and finally my drummer told him he could just to get him to shut up about it. In the meantime, we found a woman who could play well, wrote some good songs, was single and free to travel and she could sing a lot like Bonnie Raitt. It was a no brainer. We hired her. The drummer called the other guy an told him the spot was filled and he went ballistic. "I spent hours learning these stupid songs on this stupid CD!" he yelled. "Fine", my drummer said. "Now you won't have to play those stupid songs." The guy kept going on and on, alternately pleading and then cussing us out, displaying increasing instability. Finally the drummer said "it's not personal, it's business, but I will say that you just confirmed for us that we made the right decision. Good day", and that was that. Or so we thought. This guy started going around to all the jams trashing us, telling people we hired him and then pulled the rug out from under him before he ever did a gig. Most of our friends didn't believe him, but it was still a PITA to deal with. Fast forward 6 years, we're playing at a ski hill 50 miles away, and who shows up? Yep, Mr. Instability, drunk and belligerent, rehashing the same old story. He came up on the stage and started yammering away at me, calling me names, etc. The place was packed. I said "Get off my stage!" He refused and said "what are you going to do about it.?" I said, "so, you refuse to get off the stage?" He said "Yep!" and I said into the mic, "we're going to take a short break, we'll be right back" and I put my guitar down and walked away, leaving hims standing there. He looked confused for a minute, then started following me around. I finally got security to throw him out. It was a supreme effort not to deck the guy, but I learned a long time ago what a can of worms that can open! No more auditions for me unless I really know the guy or the other guys in the band do.
    1 point
  28. Keith wouldn't even need makeup! As far as the bad Dad band goes, who cares? If they were having fun, isn't that what it's all about?
    1 point


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