Jump to content

how reasonable is it to widen a pickup route with a dremel


twotimingpete

Recommended Posts

  • Members

have a melody maker. has a spot for 1 single coil pickup.

 

I can buy a pickguard with a humbucker cutout in it. I was curious how reasonably I could do this myself with a dremel tool... I figure I'd mark off about where the wood needs to come off, using the pickguard as a guide, then just grind away. it doesn't have to be super pretty because the pickguard covers it.

 

good idea bad idea?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Members

if you have the little cone router base for the dremel, its not hard at all. as mentioned a bove, clamping a ruler or block of wood as a straight edge will ensure you dont go too far. i was doing some dremel routing on a guitar i made last week. i used one of their 1/4" 2 flut straight bits at the fastest speed, worked well even freehand. the key is the high speed and larger bit. this keep torque down and makes it less likely to pull out of your control.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Members

Dremel with sanding drums. 1/2" and 1/4". The 1/4" drum lets you do tighter corners. Just go slow on the straight lines with the 1/2" drum. Don't try to take much at a pass.

All I did was tightened the sanding barrel so it was sticking out past the end of the drum just a tad. That let me get down flush with the bottom of the existing rout.

Marked with a sharpiie using the pickguard for a template. I was doing a mini HB in a tele neck and there was really very little that had to be removed.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Members

 

Use a chisel

 

 

A chisel is far more likely to end up a disaster. Going slowly with a Dremel, you save your strength and concentration for making a smooth cut. Shouldn't be a problem, I expanded the control cavity on two import Fender basses the same afternoon so they'd fit CTS pots. No drama.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Members

there will be pics if it's not too embarrassing.

 

the MM has such a soft body and it only cost me $250 and it's kinda relicced already anyway (I keep dropping {censored} on it by accident) so this is the ideal axe to try this on!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Members

Can certainly be done. I did a ghetto version once, by tightly wrapping sandpaper around a fat drill bit (secured with masking tape) to create a primitive drum sander. It was slow going, but looking back that was an advantage as it reduced the danger of taking too much off.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Members

welp, I ordered a bgbucker, so it looks like this is definitely happening. I'm getting that pickup in that guitar, period, the only question left is whether it'll be ugly and just how ugly, but it'll get done.
:)

 

Just go slow, it'll be fine.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Members

I suggested a chisel because a single chisel is a bit cheaper than a dremel set-up. Slow and steady, and a firm hand will do the job. Just be sure you know exactly where the cover will end, it's easy to nick out just a little and have a gap showing.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Members

 

I suggested a chisel because a single chisel is a bit cheaper than a dremel set-up.

 

 

That's true, but a Dremel is handy to have around anyway, for, what, $40? It would also take a lot more finesse to not hose the job badly with the chisel, which is a more niche-ey tool, IMO. I grab a Dremel all the time, but I can't remember the last time I used a woodworking chisel. Possibly in shop class, 7th grade.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Members

 

It's like the starter girl, you choose one where it doesn't matter if you go too fast and widen the hole too much.




That's true, but a Dremel is handy to have around anyway, for, what, $40? It would also take a lot more finesse to not hose the job badly with the chisel, which is a more niche-ey tool, IMO. I grab a Dremel all the time, but I can't remember the last time I used a woodworking chisel. Possibly in shop class, 7th grade.

 

 

I think a Dremel will require a bit more finesse than a chisel. A chisel won't take off on you and scratch the {censored} out of whatever you are working on. As long as your chisels are sharp and you are using an appropriate hammer you'd have to be a real goon to mess up with a chisel.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Members

 

I think a Dremel will require a bit more finesse than a chisel. A chisel won't take off on you and scratch the {censored} out of whatever you are working on. As long as your chisels are sharp and you are using an appropriate hammer you'd have to be a real goon to mess up with a chisel.

 

 

Chisels do take a bit of finesse to use well. They are also real easy, if you are not safety conscience, to have one slip and gouge the {censored} out of your hand.

 

Dremel tools, sanders, mill bits, etc. because of the rotation, tend to be a little wiggly and (for me) take a little practice to use precisely.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...