Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
rustyshed

What is a safe voltage to running gear at in the UK

Recommended Posts

I have just purchased a Power conditioner with a digital readout and I am wondering what is the safe zone to be running music gear at in the U.K?

 

I know 240v is coming out of the mains supply, just wondering how much higher or lower can it fluctuate and still be ok?

 

Thanks in adavance

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Haha Thanks Mike its not that I am worried, i had a problem a gig or two ago and 3 amps went down; well after talking on here and testing absolutely everything in the rig I could find no faults.

 

So I had to put it down to bad power, picked up a new conditioner with digital reading now so I just want to know what to look out for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Line frequency is very important. Running gear designed for 60hz at 50hz is not good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Line frequency is very important. Running gear designed for 60hz at 50hz is not good.

 

HEY BRO

 

Good point. Fortunately most modern electronics will run the mains through a rectifier that can handle both frequencies. But you should always check to make sure this is the case!

 

And just for reference, the EU voltage standard is 230V +10% -6% at 50hz.

 

In the UK you're more than likely going to get 240V, but if you want to be extra safe, you should be able to tolerate that whole range of voltages.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good point. Fortunately most modern electronics will run the mains through a rectifier that can handle both frequencies.

Actually, it's the transformers that work less efficiently at 50 Hz than 60 Hz, and a marginally designed linear power supply might not get as good filtering at 50 Hz than at 60 Hz. But it's easier with switching power supplies. As long as there's enough juice to get it started the part that does the work runs at several kHz (and creates EMI which requires proper shielding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You need a 240V - 110V transformer to run US gear on British/Australian power.

 

BTW - the transformers aren't hard to find as all building sites in the UK must operate on 110V power for safety reasons. That doesn't apply in Australia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, it's the transformers that work less efficiently at 50 Hz than 60 Hz, and a marginally designed linear power supply might not get as good filtering at 50 Hz than at 60 Hz. But it's easier with switching power supplies. As long as there's enough juice to get it started the part that does the work runs at several kHz (and creates EMI which requires proper shielding.

 

HEY BRO

 

All true, but even if your transformer works less efficiently at 50Hz, you're probably going to have to live with it. Good inverters are bloody expensive :wave:

 

As for switching power supplies, the decent ones are usually designed to work with just about any power source you can throw at them. Very convenient.

 

I did get a bit sad when they stopped including the voltage switch on computer PSUs though. No more *bang* when you set the switch to 120 and plug it into 240 mains :cry:

 

EDIT: Actually that mess about the transformers isn't totally true. Assuming your device runs on DC, you can always get a made-in-the-UK wall wart with the same voltage/current rating designed to work at 50Hz. Then you just have to worry about matching the barrel plugs :facepalm:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...