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Chumer

Epiphone Les Paul Pro FX To Be Discontinued?

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I wonder if the Epiphone Les Paul Pro FX is to be discontinued.

 

I cannot seem to confirm, although Musician's Friend and music123 are selling them for $499.00 and the MSRP is $1,165.

 

See here: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guitars/epiphone-les-paul-plustop-pro-fx-electric-guitar

 

And here: http://www.music123.com/Guitars/Electric-Guitars/Solid-Body-Electric-Guitars/Les-Paul-Plustop-PRO-FX-Electric-Guitar.site7prod423563.product

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Hmmm... well, putting a Floyd on anything is an instant deterrent to me buying it; I'm sure there are others who feel the same. Also, I think the majority of people wanting a Les Paul aren't looking for that type of bridge. I could see that being an item that wouldn't sell well.

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I adore the idea of a Floyd on a Les Paul (especially in concert with coil splitting) but personal biases aside, the price / quality / performance ratio looks very appealing.

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True, if you wanted a Floyd on an LP, that looks like a great deal. Honestly, if I wanted a Floyd-equipped guitar, I'd consider that, since I like Les Pauls.

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I've played around with them before at Guitar Center... I was a little disappointed - they felt lifeless in comparison to other guitars with Floyds and to other Les Pauls (or that may just be Epiphones.) THat really sucked, because I really wanted to like it.

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Did you plug in the Epiphone Les Paul Pro FX or just listen acoustically? The reason I ask is that a fixed bridge can sound firmer and fuller than a floating bridge especially acoustically.

 

Now if you plugged it in, you need to remember that these pickups are relatively low output and in fact old-fashioned sounding; that will make them appear to sound anemic as compared to other Les Pauls with more modern pickups.

 

In other words, when comparing Les Pauls, you need to compare low output vintage voicing to low output vintage voicing and higher output modern voicing to higher output modern voicing etc.

 

In fact, most people most of the time perceive an increase in dB output (from two sets of otherwise identically voiced pickups, in two otherwise identical guitars) to sound better.

 

Now whether you plugged it in or listened to it acoustically, another thing that suckers in most people is the condition of the strings. Unless all the guitars in comparison have the same brand and gage of string and unless all the strings are brand new, there is no way to make a truly valid sonic comparison between the guitars, acoustically or plugged in.

 

Dollars to donuts your comparison did not properly take into account the variables I've mentioned.

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Uh-oh...I feel I am talking myself into owning a Epiphone Les Paul Pro FX!

 

The closest I have right now to the Pro FX is my PRS Santana SE, but the scale length is longer and the pickups are much hotter-darker, and there is no coil split, and the trem is not as stable and the neck is much wider-fatter.

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I got one being blown out at GC a year ago for $469! I thought they were discontinuing them THEN. I personally don't get the negative comments about it though. I HATE Floyds...and I bought one after playing it. I tried out the ESP LTD LP styles that same day and IMO, there was no comparison, the Epi blew them away when it came to feel and playability. Yes, I have a real Gibson Les Paul too. I liked this Epi - the neck profile (60's v) the coil taps, the trem (even if it is a fucking FLOYD) finish (satin on the neck, gloss on the body) everything (except the pickups, which I swapped out - and I had the trem blocked for down only use... :D) But as always....YMMV.

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Mine before the pickup swap (pickups now have an aged appearance as I swapped them for a Benedetto A6 Neck and Fralin High Output Bridge- both used on Ebay) :

DSC01908.jpg

 

Hell, even with the added hardshell case , I got out of GC last year for less than $600 for that guitar.

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Is that the Dark Burst ELPXDBNF?

 

No- Honeyburst. Like most Epi finishes, they look much better in person, though not quite as "complex" as a Gibson finish IMO.

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I just might get one in honeyburst as well...yeah I think I will...you only live once and I do not have a guitar that meets those specs.

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I don't think that Epiphone is the first name that comes to mind to people who are looking for a Floyd Equipped guitar, especially with the other appointments these guitars.

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Did you plug in the Epiphone Les Paul Pro FX or just listen acoustically? The reason I ask is that a fixed bridge can sound firmer and fuller than a floating bridge especially acoustically.


Now if you plugged it in, you need to remember that these pickups are relatively low output and in fact old-fashioned sounding; that will make them appear to sound anemic as compared to other Les Pauls with more modern pickups.


In other words, when comparing Les Pauls, you need to compare low output vintage voicing to low output vintage voicing and higher output modern voicing to higher output modern voicing etc.


In fact, most people most of the time perceive an increase in dB output (from two sets of otherwise identically voiced pickups, in two otherwise identical guitars) to sound better.


Now whether you plugged it in or listened to it acoustically, another thing that suckers in most people is the condition of the strings. Unless all the guitars in comparison have the same brand and gage of string and unless all the strings are brand new, there is no way to make a truly valid sonic comparison between the guitars, acoustically or plugged in.


Dollars to donuts your comparison did not properly take into account the variables I've mentioned.

 

That seems like an odd choice (low output pups) for a floyd rose equipped axe but maybe I'm missing something? :confused:

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That seems like an odd choice (low output pups) for a floyd rose equipped axe but maybe I'm missing something?
:confused:

Many guitars have low output pickups with some sort of tremolo.

 

Some people prefer lower output pickups as they would most likely have a voicing more reminiscent of earlier pickups i.e. "vintage tone".

 

In truth, most often the output of the pickup is only of consequence if you do not have enough overall gain in the amplification stages - notwithstanding signal to noise ratio considerations which are beyond the scope of this here thread.

 

Now, you need to understand that the voicing of the pickup, and the output of the pickup are not the same thing at all, and there does not have to be a correlation between the two.

 

Having said that however, and as it relates to high impedance passive pickups, there is an expectation due to tradition (and technical considerations beyond the scope of this thread) that lower output pickups will have older-style voicings and higher output pickups will have more modern voicings.

 

Voicing (in this case) means the emphasis or deemphasis of certain frequency bands, giving the pickup its characteristic timbre due (in part) to the width of the magnetic sensing "window" and the effects of inductive and capacitive reactance.

 

Running an on-board active system and/or running low impedance pickups changes the game again, but for my post here, I am pretty much referencing high impedance passive pickups.

 

In truth, if there ever was a need for high output pickups of the type I am referring to here, it would have been before the development of modern high gain guitar amps.

 

Nowadays there are many guitar amps with so much gain that whether the pickup is high output or low output is not of great consequence, and in any case a preamp stomp-box will boost a low output pickup to well beyond what a high output pickup could muster (again we are talking passive high impedance pickups here).

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Many guitars have low output pickups with some sort of tremolo.


Some people prefer lower output pickups as they would most likely have a voicing more reminiscent of earlier pickups i.e. "vintage tone".


In truth, most often the output of the pickup is only of consequence if you do not have enough overall gain in the amplification stages - notwithstanding signal to noise ratio considerations which are beyond the scope of this here thread.


Now, you need to understand that the voicing of the pickup, and the output of the pickup are not the same thing at all, and there does not have to be a correlation between the two.


Having said that however, and as it relates to high impedance passive pickups, there is an expectation due to tradition (and technical considerations beyond the scope of this thread) that lower output pickups will have older-style voicings and higher output pickups will have more modern voicings.


Voicing (in this case) means the emphasis or deemphasis of certain frequency bands, giving the pickup its characteristic timbre due (in part) to the width of the magnetic sensing "window" and the effects of inductive and capacitive reactance.


Running an on-board active system and/or running low impedance pickups changes the game again, but for my post here, I am pretty much referencing high impedance passive pickups.


In truth, if there ever was a need for high output pickups of the type I am referring to here, it would have been before the development of modern high gain guitar amps.


Nowadays there are many guitar amps with so much gain that whether the pickup is high output or low output is not of great consequence, and in any case a preamp stomp-box will boost a low output pickup to well beyond what a high output pickup could muster (again we are talking passive high impedance pickups here).

 

Thanks, I think I benefited quite a bit from your post. I always associated high output pickups with a certain voicing.

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Thanks, I think I benefited quite a bit from your post. I always associated high output pickups with a certain voicing.

 

Thanks for taking the time to explain this as well. I feel a bit dumb now for having never realized this point. :)

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Well put it this way, take a low output pickup with a vintage voicing and run it through a pre-amp and what do you have...a high output pickup with a vintage voicing!

 

As I mentioned however, there is an expectation due to tradition (and technical considerations) that lower output pickups will have older-style voicings and higher output pickups will have more modern voicings, but it does not have to be that way.

 

I feel the most important thing is how the pickup sounds because you can alway boost the output of the pickup (indirectly) with a preamp or increase the gain on the guitar amp.

 

I've decided I'm gonna buy of them Epiphone Les Paul Pro FX's...Honeyburst...too much fun!

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Thanks _pete_ I love those guys. Chappers can really play guitar well!

 

It's interesting that the Epiphone Les Paul Pro FX kept the best tune of all the guitars tested. However they did admit that it was an out-of-the-box test, so it really did not test anything at all except the initial factory setup of the guitars.

 

So the test was not a practical comparison of tuning stability at all...too bad.

 

Also Chappers did not really like the neck on the Epiphone Les Paul Pro FX claiming it was too fat. I have an Epiphone Les Paul Ultra II with the exact same neck and it's actually slimmer than many Les Pauls.

 

Chappers also said he prefers the shredder-style necks (as popularized by the Ibanez Wizard necks for example). To each their own but for me I find the radius on shredder-style necks produces a fretboard that's too flat.

 

Chappers also has his own strat-style guitar based on a spreadsheet of his fans' votes. http://www.chapmanguitars.co.uk/

 

I wish I could play as well as Chappers; he cannot only shred, but can also play many other styles very well...he drinks way too much coffee though, as you can tell.

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Thanks _pete_ I love those guys. Chappers can really play guitar well!


It's interesting that the Epiphone Les Paul Pro FX kept the best tune of all the guitars tested. However they did admit that it was an out-of-the-box test, so it really did not test anything at all except the initial factory setup of the guitars.


So the test was not a practical comparison of tuning stability at all...too bad.


Also Chappers did not really like the neck on the Epiphone Les Paul Pro FX claiming it was too fat. I have an Epiphone Les Paul Ultra II with the exact same neck and it's actually slimmer than many Les Pauls.


Chappers also said he prefers the shredder-style necks (as popularized by the Ibanez Wizard necks for example). To each their own but for me I find the radius on shredder-style necks produces a fretboard that's too flat.


Chappers also has his own strat-style guitar based on a spreadsheet of his fans' votes.
http://www.chapmanguitars.co.uk/


I wish I could play as well as Chappers; he cannot only shred, but can also play many other styles very well...he drinks way too much coffee though, as you can tell.

 

Yes, the neck is NOT as thick as some "baseball bat" Les Pauls, in fact I think it's a nice compromise. But if you like wide flat shredder necks...why the hell are you looking at a Les Paul??? :p To be honest, I wish this thing did NOT have a Floyd, but had a nice Schaller two point traditional style trem IMO, that would have been the neo-traditionalist way to go, but instead they put a shredders trem on a traditional style axe. I just think of it as a poor mans Alex Lifeson axe. :)

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You are asking me why I am looking at a Les Paul if I like wide flat shredder necks? That is one of the oddest questions I have been asked in a considerable length of time.

 

Then again perhaps you were being humorous.

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