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Stackabones

NSD: Sears Socket 11/16"

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[video=youtube;zPQ1fZUAoBA]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zPQ1fZUAoBA

 

New Slide Day!

 

I normally use a green glass bottleneck, but when I first started playing slide I used a Sears Socket -- just like Lowell George. I lost my original one that I had toured with, and it probably doesn't even fit, so I dropped by Sears and sized up a new one. The salesman gave me an odd look, even though I explained what I was doing.

 

While I prefer the weight, balance, and tone of my glass bottleneck, I do like the sustain and brightness of steel. The socket is a little top heavy, and I think I would prefer it on my ring finger if I were to use it regularly.

 

Guitar is a Squier Telecaster Custom II w/P90s. Tuning is open E. I'm using a (discontinued) Line 6 Pocket Pod Express through a Behringer 15" Powered PA speaker. I'm reading the Marian hymn from my parish hymnal.

 

Socket is $3.99 at Sears. Life-time warranty. I even signed up for the Sears Reward Club. :p

 

Let me know what you think!

 

NewSlideSearsSocket.jpg

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Sounds great! :thu:

 

I use a Dunlop metal/chrome slide myself. I have also used socket wrenches and bottle necks but have found the standard Dunlop metal one to be my favorite over the years.

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Yeah, I have one of the Dunlop Coricidin bottles ("Blues Bottle") that sounds pretty cool, but it is a pretty loose fit. I don't like the closed end -- it gets all sweaty in there! Cool tone, though. I keep one in my gigbag as a spare.

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I tried out a V-Pick. I liked the look and the feel, but I didn't like it on acoustic. I need to find it and try it out on electric.

 

I'm intrigued by their slides. Not sure about 3/4" or 1" diameter, which for me could be a bit roomy. These are light in weight, right? That could be great for me when playing in standard tuning on light strings or low action.

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That's cool. I have the same guitar as well in black.

 

I'll scope them out next time I'm at Sears. It's funny that the socket is such a precision tool compared to a guitar slide but yet priced so much more reasonably.

 

I just play a little bit of slide. The only slide song that I can drop and play is Rollin and Tumblin. Part of my consternation with playing slide (since I'm such a plebe at it) is that I've never decided which style of slide I'd want to play therefore, I've never decided for sure which finger I want to use for the slide. But usually I gravitate towards using my annular finger but then I don't attempt to fret notes then much either when I'm in an open tuning.

 

I was watching this young lady one year playing a Les Paul in the bar of a Mexican restaurant one night. She played everything with the slide and I asked her about it and it was all in standard tuning. That's something I wish I could learn but I find that concept to be a bit mind boggling intimidating for me. There's still just so much variation on how you'd use the slide in standard, so I'll stick with opening tuning and bar sliding for now. ;)

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Hey, GAS Man, I've played a bit of slide in standard tuning. It can really work if you woodshed a bit, and the chord possibilities are pretty cool.

 

There are also a couple of one-note tweaks in standard tuning that I've used from time to time: Jive E, EADG#BE, third string up a half-step; and Cheater's G, EGDGBE, fourth string down a whole step -- a variation is EADGBD, first string down a step instead of the fourth.

 

I started playing slide in open G due to its similarities with standard: open G, DGDGBD / standard, EADGBE. Doing so helped me orient myself on the neck and gave me the ability to play in many different keys.

 

Thanks for checking out the vid!

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I tried out a V-Pick. I liked the look and the feel, but I didn't like it on acoustic. I need to find it and try it out on electric.


I'm intrigued by their slides. Not sure about 3/4" or 1" diameter, which for me could be a bit roomy. These are light in weight, right? That could be great for me when playing in standard tuning on light strings or low action.

Yes, they're very light and they feel great, just like their picks. They are very low noise and quiet, so I guess you'd have to use them on an electric. I use them with my electrics in standard tuning.

 

I bought the regular husky and it fits my pinky perfectly. I also bought the V-Slide regular, but that was way too light, not enough mass for any kind of tone. The regular husky is perfect.

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I don't think I'm clear on the low noise aspect of the V-Picks slide. Is it due to the light weight so that they don't bang the fretboard, which is a sound I kinda like especially on acoustic. Or is it due their seamless design? My bottleneck has a seam and I love the sound it makes when it scratches the wound strings a la Ry Cooder.

 

Or is it something else I'm not considering ...

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I don't think I'm clear on the low noise aspect of the V-Picks slide. Is it due to the light weight so that they don't bang the fretboard, which is a sound I kinda like especially on acoustic. Or is it due their seamless design? My bottleneck has a seam and I love the sound it makes when it scratches the wound strings a la Ry Cooder.


Or is it something else I'm not considering ...

It's because of the material the V-Slide is made out of, it's very slick on strings, and quiet. There's no rattling or buzzing like you get with metal slides, and there's no clanking like with glass slides.

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cool video above. nice sound and song.

 

 

i just got some v-picks and some gravities ones too. both great stuff although the gravity ones make a size that I like that v-picks don't. anyway they make them out of what? Polycarbonate or C39 plastic? interesting, i like to try one of the v-slides. they just look too thick and I already have big fingers so slides are hard to get. i like slides but the only one i had that would fit my finger was a glass one that i lost. I miss it.

It's because of the material the V-Slide is made out of, it's very slick on strings, and quiet. There's no rattling or buzzing like you get with metal slides, and there's no clanking like with glass slides.

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Nice, but for me, it's always going to be a piece of copper tubing. Chrome is beautiful, but it's too slick. I like the rawness of the copper against the strings. Of course, I completely suck with the slide, but at least I like how it sounds.

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It's funny that the socket is such a precision

 

It's funny that you use that particular wording. According to Sears, sockets (wrenches, screwdrivers, etc) are HAND tools. Torque wrenches, on the other hand, are "precision tools". Why is that important? When your $150 torque wrench (just past one year old) breaks, they will NOT replace it. Carry on.

 

Cool vid, btw, Stack!

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