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Unstrung

Basswood for drums...?

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Basswood is a hard wood by definition but only just IMO. It's a proven rock wood used in Strat, and Super Strat type guitars. VanHalens red thing I believe; lotta Suhr guitars - nothing dead about this wood.

I have a CB 10. Likely basswood. Sounds surprisingly clear and 10 like. I don't know how other sizes or brands fare but I suspect they might easily surpass cheap mahogany in tone. Surprising for such a soft wood.

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90% or more of any drum's sound (whether made out of balsa wood or titanium) comes from the heads. Just look at a drum when it gets hit and see what does most of the vibrating. If you're playing in a loud room with no mics nobody is going to be able to hear the difference.

 

Still, there are differences. Basswood sounds just fine if you know how to tune. Overall, I think of basswood drums as "neutral" sounding.

 

Here's an analogy for you: a decent basswood kit (pearl export, tama rockstar, yamaha stage custom, etc.) is the "Budweiser" of drum sounds. Nobody will complain about it, and you guzzle it by the pitcher and have a good time. Maple and Birch drums are the "high-end microbrew" level of drums. Somebody used to drinking Bud may not even like 'em, appreciate 'em, or wonder why they have to pay so much more for 'em. Still, people who DO know the difference will start talking about what variety of hops were used, the character of the malt, etc.

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90% or more of any drum's sound (whether made out of balsa wood or titanium) comes from the heads. Just look at a drum when it gets hit and see what does most of the vibrating. If you're playing in a loud room with no mics nobody is going to be able to hear the difference.


Still, there are differences. Basswood sounds just fine if you know how to tune. Overall, I think of basswood drums as "neutral" sounding.


Here's an analogy for you: a decent basswood kit (pearl export, tama rockstar, yamaha stage custom, etc.) is the "Budweiser" of drum sounds. Nobody will complain about it, and you guzzle it by the pitcher and have a good time. Maple and Birch drums are the "high-end microbrew" level of drums. Somebody used to drinking Bud may not even like 'em, appreciate 'em, or wonder why they have to pay so much more for 'em. Still, people who DO know the difference will start talking about what variety of hops were used, the character of the malt, etc.

 

Good analogy.

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Yes very good analogy from a very knowlagble member of these forums..

 

Bug Dag Nam It.... Now im thirsty

 

Where did I leave my coors? I know where the Fat Tire is. But I will be playing my exports at a gig tonight. Biker Bar LOL So I bet I wont find any Fat Tire there tonight. So off to the Coors...

 

Mike

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See, I would have expected a bass wood kit to be about the MOST expensive... think about how many basses have to be destroyed to make one kit :eek::D . And don't get me started on the differences between bass wood kits made from bass guitars vs. upright basses! :badump:

 

/w

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The biggest limit fo basswood (lime), is that it won't have the sharpness of attack, total volume or low end of maple. But like poplar, that doesn't mean they sound bad, it just means they have more limits than harder woods.

 

I heard a mixed basswood kit (an older mapex) and it sounded pretty nice. It just wasn't as punchy or loud as the orions. Sonor force 3003 sound terrific and they are mixed maple and basswood.

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by OS's analogy, where do the exotic woods like jarrah and bubinga fall?!

 

I'd put up there with Chimay, Duvel, or any of the excellent Belgian trappist monk produced beers. Around here, a 25 oz bottle will go for just under $10, but they're amazing, and pack about 10% alcohol.

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90% or more of any drum's sound (whether made out of balsa wood or titanium) comes from the heads. .

 

+100, Steven...:cool: as well as the drummer

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Old Steve's analogy was good, except for one point. People can, and do, complain about Budweiser - especially here in Australia.

Budweiser has to be one of the of the weakest, watery and unexciting beers i've ever had - over here we've got light beer that packs more of a punch than Budweiser, hell, even our orange juice tastes more like beer than your Budweiser does, lol.

And that Miller stuff tastes pretty bland too. But i certainly won't make up my mind on American beer based just on those two drops, because i know what it's like to be represented around the world by one, substandard, dirty tasting beer - Fosters.

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Here's an analogy for you: a decent basswood kit (pearl export, tama rockstar, yamaha stage custom, etc.) is the "Budweiser" of drum sounds.

 

Great analogy, just nit picking: Exports are poplar and Stage Customs are like a super blend of birch, mahogany and some others. :D

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Old Steve's analogy was good, except for one point. People can, and do, complain about Budweiser - especially here in Australia.

Budweiser has to be one of the of the weakest, watery and unexciting beers i've ever had - over here we've got light beer that packs more of a punch than Budweiser, hell, even our orange juice tastes more like beer than your Budweiser does, lol.

And that Miller stuff tastes pretty bland too. But i certainly won't make up my mind on American beer based just on those two drops, because i know what it's like to be represented around the world by one, substandard, dirty tasting beer - Fosters.

 

I can't argue with your findings about Budweiser. On the other hand, they sell about a zillion barrels of the stuff worldwide, and people keep buying it. Kind of like lower-end drums. And like the drums, many people find the results just fine (just like you can get all jacked up on Budwieser and fall off your barstool...takes a while, but it happens ;)).

 

There's a whole story about why the "light american lager'' form of beer (aka Bud, Miller, Coors, etc.) came into existance. It was a combination of the "surviving" american beer companies after prohibition, WWII, and lots of other things. The good news is, there's a whole resurgance of american craft brewing going on, so "Bud" isn't necessariliy a good reflection of what's happening around here these days.

 

Bud (and it's counterparts) are basically "thirst quencher" beers as far as I'm concerned. On a hot day, after a softball game, sitting in a rowboat with a fishing pole, sitting in the stands at a ballpark, etc., etc. when you're actually thirsty, these very light beers can do the job just fine.

 

Bodinski's reference....that's not something you want to gulp down in a hurry after you've finished mowing the lawn. Dehydration + those blue bombs = rapid unconsciousness! Bodinski: after a 60-70 mile bike ride a couple summers ago, me and my buddy were sitting outside drinking Chimay's beige label beers. We each had a couple of the 25oz bottles, and since we were thirsty from the ride, the first ones went down in about 10 minutes. I slept for about 19 consecutive hours afterward.

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And where to hybrids of basswood and birch fall, such as the new Tama Superstars? Seasonal brews?
;)

 

Ok, ok, ok....every anology can only be streched so far! :thu:

 

I think I'd put Pearl's Reference Series (different specs for each drum) in the "beer sampler 6-pack" category....the kind with several varieties from the same brewery.

 

Tama Superstars would be like some of Anheuser Busch and Miller's entries into "fancy beers". I'm thinking your Michelob Honey Lager or maybe Michelob Amber Bock type beers.

 

BTW, I gave up drinking for Lent. This conversation is getting painful, and I'm not even a week in yet....:cry:

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Oh yeah, if a drumset actually wanted to be compared to Budweiser, they'd be made of Beechwood.

 

Hell, that's it! Bud can make a limited edition drum kit out of Beechwood shells!!!

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