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scott99

Hello everyone!

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I've been browsing the website for almost two weeks absorbing what information has been posted on this forum. I must say it's a lot of great information and I want to thank everyone for sharing their knowledge and experience with everyone including myself.

 

I had many questions when seeking out this forum to begin with but with a lot of reading, many have been answered.

 

I've always loved music and had always wanted to learn to sing. My biggest thing is just fear of what I really sounded like. I've never sang in front of anyone nor ever recorded myself before 2 weeks ago so I decided recording myself might be the best thing to do for now. With the initial recording, I heard a lot of nasal sound and my words sounded very muffled. My searching for a remedy is what lead me to this forum.:wave:

 

My particular question now is: Is it important to work on every area at once or could you go step by step solving issues and not moving on until the issue is resolved?

 

I'm a 25 year old male.

I'm sure i'm doing a lot of things wrong when singing, but am working on recognizing the issue and replace it with a proper method. I also decided today to see what my range currently is and all I have is a frequency meter used to tune a guitar on my cell phone. My low is 76Hz and my high is 1107hz comfortably. In relation to that, I looked for a frequency chart for notes and found this one.

 

How accurate is that in accordance to how i'd refer to my range? If that being accurate, would my range be D#2-C6(almost C#6)?

 

At this moment, I am more wanting to control, strengthen, and work towards a better tone quality than extend the range itself.

 

I didn't mean to type this much, I was just meaning a short simple howdy but my fingers got away from me.

 

Anyhow, thanks again for the advice that has already been posted and that will be posted!

 

Matthew

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I think it's fine to work on one thing at a time/step by step, as opposed to trying to work on everything at once. That's pretty much how my voice teacher taught me. One week, we'd work on one area, and then the next week or so later, we'd move on to another area.

 

Welcome to the forums! I hope you have a good stay here and learn a lot. :)

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I've no idea really, but I'd say it doesn't really matter if you choose to work on everything simultaneously or one thing at a time. When thinking about it though, I realize you can't really focus on all problems at once, so in a sense, your question doesn't make sense :p.

 

Why did you tell us what 'range' you have? The problems you mention are not related to frequency - what you need to do is practise articulation and resonance placement, to get rid of muffled words and nasal timbre respectively.

 

When articulating, it might help to think of singing as elongated speech. Imagine a pal in front of you, who's a bit retarded so you have to speak rather clearly for him/her to understand. Record and see if there's a difference. :)

 

About resonance, that's harder to explain. I'd first try with imitating singers who resonate with very little nasal timbre. Like Paul Young, f.x. (Also, play around with yawning+singing simultaneously - record this and take note of what sounds you like/dislike.)

 

Welcome to the forums and good luck! :wave:

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Thanks for the responses. I've read a lot of the fixes on the forum and am already working on it. Elongated speech sounds just as weird as the muffled but it at least is audible. Lol! I was wondering if the frequency chart is an accurate reference in relation to range.

 

What ive been working on is dropping the jaw, lowering the back of the tongue and opening the throat more on vowels to create a clearer sound with no nasal sound. Seems to be working when i record myself singing.

 

Ive also been working on singing through the break in my voice which has been my main focus.

 

Thanks for the welcome, i was nervous to even post on here. :-)

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Hi Matthew, welcome to the forum. :wave:

 

I would advise against lowering the back of the tongue. Its not particularly healthy for the voice and overly thickens the voice, giving a false sense of "space". The tongue will actually change position slightly depending on the vowel you're singing, it should be somewhat neutral or slightly arched, but never depressed. The best way to open the throat is to lift the soft palate up. Once you raise the soft palate you will have less nasality. You should note that there's a difference between nasality and nasal resonance, true nasal resonance is beneficial. I also wouldn't recommend focusing too much on a specific singing aspect. Practicing too much on one thing can cause imbalance in the voice. Its important to change your routine every once in a while. Regarding range, you should practice throughout your entire comfortable range, both full voice and falsetto, but the most important part of the voice is the middle range (B3 to F4). Having a balanced middle range is probably the most important in my opinion.

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I've been browsing the website for almost two weeks absorbing what information has been posted on this forum. I must say it's a lot of great information and I want to thank everyone for sharing their knowledge and experience with everyone including myself.


I had many questions when seeking out this forum to begin with but with a lot of reading, many have been answered.


I've always loved music and had always wanted to learn to sing. My biggest thing is just fear of what I really sounded like. I've never sang in front of anyone nor ever recorded myself before 2 weeks ago so I decided recording myself might be the best thing to do for now. With the initial recording, I heard a lot of nasal sound and my words sounded very muffled. My searching for a remedy is what lead me to this forum.
:wave:

My particular question now is:
Is it important to work on every area at once or could you go step by step solving issues and not moving on until the issue is resolved?


I'm a 25 year old male.

I'm sure i'm doing a lot of things wrong when singing, but am working on recognizing the issue and replace it with a proper method. I also decided today to see what my range currently is and all I have is a frequency meter used to tune a guitar on my cell phone. My low is 76Hz and my high is 1107hz comfortably. In relation to that, I looked for a frequency chart for notes and found
this one
.


How accurate is that in accordance to how i'd refer to my range? If that being accurate, would my range be D#2-C6(almost C#6)?


At this moment, I am more wanting to control, strengthen, and work towards a better tone quality than extend the range itself.


I didn't mean to type this much, I was just meaning a short simple howdy but my fingers got away from me.


Anyhow, thanks again for the advice that has already been posted and that will be posted!


Matthew

 

You can break things up if you want.

 

For example:

 

Vocal workout CD

Rhythm training

Alignment/posture exercises

Breathing exercises

Resonance exercises

Onsets/Linking exercises

Diction

Ear training (for transcribing music by ear)

Solfege (for singing acapella)

Scales/Drills/etc

Music theory

Piano/guitar (to accompany your singing)

 

All of these are important.

You don't have to do them all in a structured manner.

 

For example, you can do breathing exercises for a few minutes

at random times of the day (like anytime you're walking outside).

 

Or you can use ear training CDs whenever you're on lunch break.

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You can break things up if you want.


For example:


Vocal workout CD

Rhythm training

Alignment/posture exercises

Breathing exercises

Resonance exercises

Onsets/Linking exercises

Diction

Ear training (for transcribing music by ear)

Solfege (for singing acapella)

Scales/Drills/etc

Music theory

Piano/guitar (to accompany your singing)


All of these are important.

You don't have to do them all in a structured manner.


For example, you can do breathing exercises for a few minutes

at random times of the day (like anytime you're walking outside).


Or you can use ear training CDs whenever you're on lunch break.

 

That is great! Thank you! I definitely need to work on ALL those areas. My main goal from this is to be confident and comfortable with singing in front of someone. I don't foresee myself being a great singer, but just want to do things the right way instead of what I am doing now. (never hurts nor gets hoarse or tired, but just want to make sure the way I sing isn't damaging to my vocal cords.)

 

I've created scales with a music program that fits my range, but is it necessary to go my entire range, or will it cause my range to become shorter if I don't?

 

Sorry for any silly questions, I'm very inexperienced when it comes to vocal training. The only vocal class I had was in the 3rd grade and from that point on I just did band because I was shy and didn't like to talk let alone sing.

 

Thank you all for the responses! They are/will be very helpful.

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Thanks Davie!


Right after recording myself and listening to it the first time, I decided to look in a mirror at what was happening in my mouth when i'd sing. My tongue was so high that it looked as though it was blocking my throat so I figured this is where the muffled sound was coming from. However, I probably am pushing the tongue down instead of just letting it rest naturally. I will have to work on that.


I think the mid-range is the part of my voice that needs the most attention. Another thing that seems to be a mystery to me is how to tell if you're singing in a head voice or in a falsetto. I've noticed a lot of websites depict falsetto/head voice differently so forgive me if my questions don't make sense.




That is great! Thank you! I definitely need to work on ALL those areas. My main goal from this is to be confident and comfortable with singing in front of someone. I don't foresee myself being a great singer, but just want to do things the right way instead of what I am doing now. (never hurts nor gets hoarse or tired, but just want to make sure the way I sing isn't damaging to my vocal cords.)


I've created scales with a music program that fits my range, but is it necessary to go my entire range, or will it cause my range to become shorter if I don't?


Sorry for any silly questions, I'm very inexperienced when it comes to vocal training. The only vocal class I had was in the 3rd grade and from that point on I just did band because I was shy and didn't like to talk let alone sing.


Thank you all for the responses! They are/will be very helpful.

 

If you can, I'd recommend getting voice lessons.

A good teacher will be able to help you out.

 

Since you're a beginner, you have a lot of training ahead of you.

It may take years before your voice sounds good.

So you have to be in it for the long run.

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Indeed! I know its not going to be quick to get my voice where i want it to be. Its a long road but i think its going to be a great experience. Im keeping all my recordings just to see the improvement(or no improvement) down the road. Even just dropping the jaw made a big instantaneous improvement, but dont expect everything to be that quick. :-)

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You know, you might want to try recording yourself singing while actually watching / recording yourself on a camera / webcam. I find if you can see yourself while singing, and are watching yourself as if others are watching you, you tend to "perform" a bit more. And I don't mean actual PERFORMING at all, but just...you tend to enunciate more clearly, you're just more aware of what you're doing.

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...you tend to enunciate more clearly, you're just more aware of what you're doing.

 

I've noticed this while doing it in front of a mirror. I could hear the pitch of my voice a lot better as well. I will need to get enough courage to record myself and post it in this thread. I'm sure there's a lot of things i'm doing wrong that I overlook due to my inexperience that you guy's will have pointers for by hearing me.

 

Thanks again to everyone responding to this thread! I appreciate the kindness on this forum. :)

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