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Voltaire

Getting the sound from your ears recorded... (confusing)

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When people speak...they hear their voices..and they think that it's what their voices sound like and hell.. these people may even think they're good singers.

 

and then comes.. RECORDING.. and you go in thinking you're good shit and you hear yourself and it's like... nails on chalkboards.

 

So, how can I eq/filter/whatever to get my vocal recordings to sound like what it sounds like in my head. --or from my mouth hearing it through my ears.

 

confusing?!?

 

(p.s I'm using an SM58)

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Well... I know precisely what you're asking about because I wondered the same thing way back and kept wondering and... someplace along the line I heard my voice recorded so much that I sort of learned to process or translate how it sounds inside my head into what I know it sounds like in the room.

 

Now, the self-hearing mechanism is actually much trickier and more complicated than it might seem at first blush. It's almost like your voice is dimmed (lowered in volume) in your head -- have you noticed how you can still hear other folks talking when you're talking -- even though, if you think about it, your voice in your head must be so very much louder... there's almost a sort of self-attenuation that goes on. (Either that or I dreamed I read it in some science magazine. :D )

 

 

Anyhow, I never came up with an answer myself and before I knew it, my voice tended to sound like my voice to me. When I used to perform in clubs, I became very attuned to the way my voice sounded over a PA and now, when I'm playing guitar in a room for others, I'll listen to the sound of my voice as it reflects off the walls as yet another way of checking up on how it sounds.

 

 

But, I'll tell you, the first time I was recorded, when I was about 3-1/2 or so, it was before I knew there was such a thing as a tape recorder (this was the mid 50s and I was, you know, 3-1/2 ;) ), my folks tricked me into 'singing' my big hit, Mary Had a Little Lamb at a neighbor's. I was over that song, but I humored them, and then, before I knew it, there was a kind of dark, muddled voice coming back singing the same song -- but it clearly was not me. Even after they showed me the old Wollensak recorder, and explained that nobody thinks their recorded voice actually sounds like them, I absolutely did not believe it. I was convinced they'd hidden some other little kid who sang it and literally went around the room looking.

 

 

PS... when I was young I though I sang in tune, too. :D

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Well... I know precisely what you're asking about because I wondered the same thing way back and kept wondering and... someplace along the line I heard my voice recorded so much that I sort of learned to process or translate how it sounds inside my head into what I know it sounds like in the room.


Now, the self-hearing mechanism is actually much trickier and more complicated than it might seem at first blush. It's almost like your voice is dimmed (lowered in volume) in your head -- have you noticed how you can still hear other folks talking when you're talking -- even though, if you think about it, your voice in your head must be so very much louder... there's almost a sort of self-attenuation that goes on. (Either that or I dreamed I read it in some science magazine.
:D
)



Anyhow, I never came up with an answer myself and before I knew it, my voice tended to sound like my voice to me. When I used to perform in clubs, I became very attuned to the way my voice sounded over a PA and now, when I'm playing guitar in a room for others, I'll listen to the sound of my voice as it reflects off the walls as yet another way of checking up on how it sounds.



But, I'll tell you, the first time I was recorded, when I was about 3-1/2 or so, it was before I knew there was such a thing as a tape recorder (this was the mid 50s and I was, you know, 3-1/2
;)
), my folks tricked me into 'singing' my big hit, Mary Had a Little Lamb at a neighbor's. I was over that song, but I humored them, and then, before I knew it, there was a kind of dark, muddled voice coming back singing the same song -- but it
clearly was not me
. Even after they showed me the old Wollensak recorder, and explained that nobody thinks their recorded voice actually sounds like them, I absolutely did not believe it. I was convinced they'd hidden some other little kid who sang it and literally went around the room looking.



PS... when I was young I though I sang
in tune
, too.
:D

 

Goshh, I understand where you're coming from : D

 

Hah, it just makes me mad because.. my voice.. terrible, I would never sing to a crowd with it, but I'm trying to do the whole solo thing and i want to record some things and it's like.. ugh!

 

Thanks for your awesome insight though : )

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.. someplace along the line I heard my voice recorded so much that I sort of learned to process or translate how it sounds inside my head into what I know it sounds like in the room.

 

Me too. Actually "sounds" the same whether I hear it off tape or just live. :)

 

Funny how perception is so strong. Same aural input, lots of processing. :)

 

Terry D.

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So, how can I eq/filter/whatever to get my vocal recordings to sound like what it sounds like in my head. --or from my mouth hearing it through my ears.

 

Simple answer... you can't.

 

What you hear in your head is way different than what others hear through the air as you have things like bones and sinuses that alter the way you're hearing your voice.

 

What you can do as a singer to improve your tone and performance is learn breathing excercises and technique... this will help you achieve a fuller, "better" tone when singing into machines.

 

Rule of thumb... you can't really use machines to fix acoustic problems... put a 'Band-Aid

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Ya, I don't think it will ever sound the same. Your hearing the inside of your head as well as the external sound. I think it's just a matter of lots of time spent with a mic in your face, be it recording or live, to know what to expect and become farmiliar with it.

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Right... I think with increased familiarity with your voice over recorders or simply over live reinforcement, you sort of learn to 'translate.'

 

(Sadly, I think sometimes my brain slaps a little Auto-Tune on my vocals as I'm listening in my head... of course that doesn't get recorded... leading to that playback moment when you go, I sang that wildly out of tune note? Holy cow! :D )

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All kinds of experiments with mikes over the years with stereo fields including installing mikes in a dummy head, putting two mikes on different sides of a barrier, putting them at 90 degrees, XY configurations you name it. All can be found on the net, All have they benifits, All have theyre flaws. No one method works for everything and the mass (if it exists) between most peoples ears varies alot.

This is the true art of acoustics, and I do say an Art. Its making people believe they are hearing things for real using the primative tools audio engineers have.

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Track with your vocals LOUD in the cans a few times, it should help you make a start in matching the sound in your head to the sound in your speakers (not so loud to cause hearing damage). Headphones put the sound in the speakers into your head (I'm very tired as I write this, you get what I mean) and you can start modifying sibilants, flattening vowels etc. etc. as you sing

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