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green_monster

Tinnitus vs. Music Career

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I'm 20 and in the process of applying to University in Electro-Acoustic Studies at Concordia here in Montreal.

For a 20 year old, my tinnitus is already pretty bad. Most of the damage seems to be in the 16khz to 20khz range.

Am I wasting my time? Should I be able to lead a succsessful career in the industry for any lenghly period of time? Or should I look at a career change while I still can?

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Go. To. An. ENT.

 

Get. Earplugs.

 

EDIT: Possibly a more helpful answer...this industry (and any industry really) is about results. Can you mix/master/whatever well? Can you make things sound "good"? It doesn't matter how well you can technically hear, it matters if you can make something sound good. Obviously good hearing is an asset, it is not necessarily a requirement however.

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To the OP:

what exactly are you looking into doing in the industry? if it's recording I could probably point you to some better places to learn than Concordia. It doesn't look like recording is the main focus of their electroacoustics major. I go to Concordia and I was going to go to the music department but I just wasn't very impressed when compared to the other options for learning music in the city. (I'm taking a backup degree, and then probably starting private studio courses)

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Sorry to hear of your situation. I have Tinnitus pretty bad too, although I'm in mid-life and contracted it about five years ago when I blew out my hearing at a very loud concert by a Pink Floyd tribute band. I went to two different ENT's and there is very little the medical profession has to offer Tinnitus sufferers. I've also tried a lot of alternative treatments with little sucess. However, I'm not letting it stop me, and am working full time as a music producer and recording artist.

 

However, I'm not sure what I would do if I were 20 and just starting out. I suppose you could give it a shot and spend a couple years trying it out and see how it is for you. In the process, you might find a niche in the music industry that worked for you that wasn't as taxing on your hearing as others. You are young enough that if it didn't work out, you could make a career switch. It would be a shame to give up on your dream without trying and you might regret it later in life. However, if working with audio irritates your hearing significantly, it might be better to pursue a different direction.

 

I know that for me, spending long hours recording, mixing, editing, etc can be a strain on the ears, but I just accept it and keep going. The thing that has worked best for me when it gets me down is to try to focus on all the other things I have to be thankful for in my life.

 

I wish you the best with your decision and your career.

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Go. To. An. ENT.

 

Get. Earplugs.

 

QUOTE]

 

Done. And Done-er. Emsee Laboratories Canada, little buggers cost me $200 but it was the best money I ever spent.

 

I respect your collective advice. Maybe this is a dumb question, but: how much worse could it really get? Do I risk being deaf in ten years? In any case, I think I'll start the program and see how it works out from there. You're right, Karma, it wouldn't be the end of the world to change careers and I don't lose much by trying.

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Believe it or not, Tinnitus and hearing loss and not necessarily related, although they have a common cause.

 

I'm 51 and finally have developed Tinnitus after decades of loud music. Yet, my hearing still checks out as fine.

 

I don't expect that to last forever...

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For a 20 year old, my tinnitus is already pretty bad. Most of the damage seems to be in the 16khz to 20khz range.


Many people seem to think everyone hears up to 20 khz if they're young, and that's just not true. An audiologist can explain this to you, and there's info on the net about it.

 

Unless you are suffering degradation in your hearing as a result of a medical condition ( not necessariy Tinnitus) of some kind, you may be overrreacting.

 

I know an engineer who's hearing is punched above 13-14k and is developing a worsening trough in the 6-8k range. He still is making money at it because he's good and has learned to work around this limitation.

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