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Fireball_73

Ebanol fingerboard explanation...

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Well, it's really ebon
al
as far as I can tell.


Ebonal is probably my favorite fingerboard material for fretless. I think one reason the Squier VM fretless stacks up so well against other fretlesses is because of the ebonal. I haven't played quite enough ebony boards to really know if I prefer them or not.

EBONOL. As in EBONOL.

What's so hard about this word that English speaking people feel the need to spell it wrong ?

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I've seen the Mighty Mite fretless
P bass neck with ebonol
board for $100 on the bay....If you like the p neck you could go that route...


I've never pursued it to see if those vendors sell a j neck but one would think they would....

 

 

Thats what I thought, but I still have not seen a fretless Mighty Mite Jazz neck. :idk:

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Thats what I thought, but I still have not seen a fretless Mighty Mite Jazz neck.
:idk:

 

AFAIK, they make no eba/ono/al jazz necks.

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I have both materials on two of my basses. One is the Squire VM fretless with you-know-what (don't want any part of the spelling debate :) ), the other is a Warmoth fretless with a raw ebony board. Both strung with nickel rounds.

 

Sound-wise, obviously I'm going to be biased towards the Warmoth that I built and spent a lot more $$ and stress on, but it's not a fair comparison since they don't have any wood nor hardware in common.

 

As far as wear goes, I play both about equally and both materials seem to hold up pretty good. The Squire is the only passive bass I have right now, so I keep it plugged into my desktop for latenight noodling and recording sudden ideas, otherwise my Warmoth is the go-to. Both have the telltale roundwound patterns grinded into them.

 

I do have to give credit to my Squire though, since it was my first fretless and put up with a lot of initial fretless "dont's."

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My experience with Ebanol is the fretboards on Switch Signature model guitars. They are no longer manufactured. I found mine and a few others for friends and family on Ebay. There is a Signature model fretless bass, but I have only seen one for sale. The bodies on all Swithch guitars are manufactured from a material called Vibracell which is a resin and allows for a one piece body/neck. It really increases sustain and sounds great. It is supposed to duplicate mahogony. With the Ebanol fretboard option the notes are brighter and sing a bit more than with the rosewood fretboard. When new it looks like glass. With wear it looks more like ebony. If you have not had experience with an ebony fretboard, it sounds a lot like maple. I plan to put one of the Mighty Mite necks on a Fender P-Bass. I only wish they had the fret lines painted or inlaid in the Ebanol. I have a Yamaha BB-300 that had the frets removed and filled, fitted with flatwound strings and it is really easy to play and sounds great.

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Jazz Ad is right, Ebanol is pretty much a perfect material for fretless. I mean, he keeps repeating it here with "it's ebanol!"! Like "what's the word? Thunderbird!"

 

Question: What's the best neck material?

Answer: It's Ebanol!

 

Ebanol is where it's at! :thu:

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That's a different compound than what we're talking about. That's eb
a
nol, and it appears to be a liquid.

 

understood...!:wave:

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info about ebanol


they started doing clarinets in this type of polymer with success due to the cost and availablity of grenadilla ebony

for the bass i would guess its a aquisition and machineability plus exercise

the polymers dont shrink or crack and dont need maintenance


bassoons are made now of polymers

 

corrected sperring and source info

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Jazz Ad is right, Ebanol is pretty much a perfect material for fretless. I mean, he keeps repeating it here with "it's ebanol!"! Like "what's the word? Thunderbird!"


Question: What's the best neck material?

Answer: It's Ebanol!


Ebanol is where it's at!
:thu:

 

no it aint...its ebonol

 

i am assured ebanol is a liquid...:confused:

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That's a different compound than what we're talking about. That's eb
a
nol, and it appears to be a liquid.

 

unquote

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:lol:
I was just yanking on Jazz Ad's chain. It's Ebonol.

 

cheers GJ

 

i learned something and got 3 more posts....

 

my clarinet and oboe were made from sonorite..now its called durable resin

all i expect do the same job

 

on a bass the ebaonaol sounds good and pretty stable too

 

http://www.gear4music.com/Woodwind-Brass-Strings/Student-Oboe-by-Gear4music-Ebony-Finish/3R0

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cheers GJ


i learned something and got 3 more posts....


my clarinet and oboe were made from sonorite..now its called durable resin

all i expect do the same job


on a bass the ebaonaol sounds good and pretty stable too


http://www.gear4music.com/Woodwind-Brass-Strings/Student-Oboe-by-Gear4music-Ebony-Finish/3R0

 

What were clarinets and oboes used to be made of? Wood with some sort of heavy lacquer on them? I'm totally clueless about many things, and woodwind instruments is one of them.

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What were clarinets and oboes used to be made of? Wood with some sort of heavy lacquer on them? I'm totally clueless about many things, and woodwind instruments is one of them.

 

well not strangely enough they were..and still are..made from ebony just as fretless bass boards are

its grenadilla ebony to be exact

bassoons are made from various maples...but now resins are used as well

 

mrs crows piccolo is made in resin as well..usually the lower priced end

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