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Maple body


REMUS

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I'm bidding on a Spector Rex Brown sig at the moment :love:

 

However i've just been told maple isn't a good tonewood?

 

Is this true? I'll be perfectly honest i've never played the bass and i've also never paid any attention to the tonewood during the selection of a bass.

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I'm bidding on a Spector Rex Brown sig at the moment
:love:

However i've just been told maple isn't a good tonewood?


Is this true? I'll be perfectly honest i've never played the bass and i've also never paid any attention to the tonewood during the selection of a bass.

 

Who told you maple wasn't a good tonewood? All maple basses are probably going to be heavy as hell, but there's nothing tonally wrong with maple for bodies. It's tonally bright and sustains well. If you're into more resonance and warmth, it might not be your top choice, but there's nothing wrong with it at all. Lots of nice basses have partially or completely maple bodies (off the top of my head - Gibson Rippers, Rics, Quakes, umm, the list is endless).

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Maple is a very hard closed grain wood. It tends to sound bright when used in musical instruments. Six string guitars sound brighter in maple, basses with maple necks sound brighter than rosewood. I hope this helps......DK

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Hey Remus, does that Rex Brown sig have the hologram finish? I always thought it looked pretty cool though I'm sure it would look alot diferent in person.

 

The holoflash finish looks best under stage lights. I had a fiftysomething guy tell me that he never really cared for it until he saw mine onstage. Unfortunately, it doesn't photograph well. :(

 

As for the original question: I played an LTD Tom Araya sig model with the maple body, and I was quite surprised at how deep the tone was. I found the agathis bodies to be brighter.

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I think it photographs really well!

 

Won the bass and i'm very pleased :D

 

How about OAK now that would be a heavy bass. I personaly like mahogany and walnut myself.

 

I said exactly the same thing while speaking with the person in question on this subject, I really couldn't understand why he had a problem with it as a tonewood?

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I have two all maple basses, my Gibby Victory Artist and my Steinberger Spirit fiver. The Gibby is a HUGE sounding bass, really deep, clear, powerful, and sustains very well. Has a Moog designed active pre and split coil humbuckers, and can sound old-school vintagy or clean and clear modern.

 

I think that as long as you match up the pickups correctly a maple bass can be a fantastic sounding bass. My Spirit has a set of Barts on the way, which should make a great combination, I hope!

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There've been guitars made out of maple.

 

There are several different kinds of maple, generally eastern and western.

 

I think it's generally the eastern maple that is lighter than the western, I may have that backwards, though...

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Most high end acoustics and pretty much most all violins are made of maple with a spruce top and the older it isthe better it sounds.

There is absolutley nothing at all wrong with maple tone wood but like the others said a solid body made from maple could be a bit on the heavy side.

I dont think there is any piece of wood that looks better than a nice piece of flamed maple and I like birds eye maple too.

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