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A question on the versatility of Rickenbackers


50calexplorer

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I have bitten by the rickenbacker bug, and have been offered a great price from a local music store with a new 4003 in Jetglo, mainly for playing in the band I'm with now.

 

Anywho, how versatile can I get this. I'm playing in mainly a blues trio right now and I'm starting a new band with a style like the rolling stones, ryan adams, and neil young and crazy horse.

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imho you will tire of it...and you will always have the monkey around your neck telling you its the only bass to have

not bad to try one out...but imho its not a versatile bass...and its dated in its construction and user friendly design

 

sound wise it is itself

 

try a ray

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They're just as versatile as any other bass and even more so if you use the foam mute built into the bridge. Ricks have gotten a reputation for having a lot of treble and bite, but they can also give you a deep, round, flubby tone with the neck pickup on. While a new 4003 can definitely do the clanky "Roundabout" tone, it can also do a whole host of other things.

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It suffers from "well, I heard some guy on the interwebs say it's a one trick pony" and words gets around rather quickly. I don't find it any less versatile then my Fender Jazz bass. I'm at College right now but if you PM me over the weekend when I get home, I can send you some different clips of the way Rics sound.

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imho you will tire of it...and you will always have the monkey around your neck telling you its the only bass to have

not bad to try one out...but imho its not a versatile bass...and its dated in its construction and user friendly design


sound wise it is itself


try a ray

 

 

 

I've tried several and I always go back to my Sterlings for that. The Stingrays are just a bit too much size-wise for me (the neck).

 

Plus as I'm wondering if the 33 inch scale will be alittle easier on my hands than my EBMM's.

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They are versatile. I farted around with one in a store for almost an hour just to see how versatile they really are... and I can't complain.

 

They're not going to be as versatile as some with double humbuckers (with modded wiring, coil tapping, etc). But for two single coils... I'd say they are about as versatile as you can get.

 

Just my opinion...

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It suffers from "well, I heard some guy on the interwebs say it's a one trick pony" and words gets around rather quickly. I don't find it any less versatile then my Fender Jazz bass. I'm at College right now but if you PM me over the weekend when I get home, I can send you some different clips of the way Rics sound.

 

 

Never TRIED to make one real traditional sounding but here are two from the same bass on the same pandora EQ settings that sound quite different to me:

 

http://www.box.net/public/static/ghqd9s3g31.mp3

 

http://www.box.net/public/static/n9duf8m4l7.wav

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I've tried several and I always go back to my Sterlings for that. The Stingrays are just a bit too much size-wise for me (the neck).


Plus as I'm wondering if the 33 inch scale will be alittle easier on my hands than my EBMM's.

 

33 and a HALF inch.:D

 

I don't really notice that difference when switching between my P-bass and the Ric. But I've been accused of being an insensitive bastard more than once.

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I've had mine since 1999 and have played everything from Punk to Polka and back again.

 

90% of tone is in your fingers and your unique style. you can set up any tone you want with a decent amp and the styling is classic.

 

I have purchased several basses since my Ric and play them often but when I want to impress or bring only one bass, I bring the Ric.

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I've had mine since 1999 and have played everything from Punk to Polka and back again.


90% of tone is in your fingers and your unique style. you can set up any tone you want with a decent amp and the styling is classic.


I have purchased several basses since my Ric and play them often but when I want to impress or bring only one bass, I bring the Ric.

Couldn't have said it better myself Kev.

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imho you will tire of it...and you will always have the monkey around your neck telling you its the only bass to have

not bad to try one out...but imho its not a versatile bass...and its dated in its construction and user friendly design


sound wise it is itself


try a ray

 

 

:bor:

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I have bitten by the rickenbacker bug, and have been offered a great price from a local music store with a new 4003 in Jetglo, mainly for playing in the band I'm with now.


Anywho, how versatile can I get this. I'm playing in mainly a blues trio right now and I'm starting a new band with a style like the rolling stones, ryan adams, and neil young and crazy horse.

 

 

that really depends on how well you can play to begin with.

 

it will not play for you.

 

it will not make you sound better.

 

it will have some distinct tones

 

it will make you feel go while playing it.

 

would Jimi Hendrix be any more or less amazing on a Les Paul? it is the style you bring to the bass

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