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OT, PC, File Shredder


D Aussie

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Here's the situation:

 

 

 

You have a file you no longer want around, for whatever reason.

 

You delete said file.

 

The system marks it as deleted, but does not do anything to destroy said file. It is just now available to be written over.

 

File recovery software ignores the system's own file information table, and searches for files 'manually', sort of.

 

Your new software will do something along the lines of writing zeros across the file, to prevent said recovery software from being able to do anything to retrieve the file.

A very determined (and well funded) searcher could take the drive to a data recovery company that specializes in hard drive forensics to dig down further though.

 

The 'shredder' software just makes it that much harder (and usually to the point that it's not worth it) to try to get files off the drive after they've been whacked.

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well that is very interesting Mr Devey.

Would a defrag, provide the same resul;t.

What about compeletel;y filling the hard drive with junk info.

 

 

The latter would be better, but you'd really want to fill the whole disk with random junk and then erase repeatedly (which is basically what those programs do, sort of). I've written simple scripts to do just that in the past. Never had the "opportunity" to find out how well it did the job, though.

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So they're worried someone's actually going to steal their HDD and pay the thousands of dollars required to get a few phone numbers from their HDD?

 

Mate... the IT savvy crowd prey apon the small business man.

I thought it sounded dodgy.

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well that is very interesting Mr Devey.

Would a defrag, provide the same resul;t.

What about compeletel;y filling the hard drive with junk info.

 

Yes and no.

 

"Scrubber" software immediately writes over the file, often multiple times, and in different patterns (all zeros, all ones, alternating, etc). A defrag will move everything around, so the files closest the center of the disk will be written over, but there will be tons of bits of files still hanging out closer to the edge of the disk.

 

Filling it with junk would be a step in the same direction, but the patterns help to make it more difficult to recover data.

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