Jump to content

Removing finish from a dyed maple top


Flod

Recommended Posts

  • Members

I've removed a finish from a solid colour bass before, and that one had at sealing coat or some such under the black paint. Now I'm thinking of changing the finish from a dyed black maple topped bass, and I wondered what layers of finish I'm likely to encounter?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

If it is indeed dyed you will have a very, VERY difficult time getting it all gone. I hope you have more than a veneer top as you could have to eliminate 1/16" of material or more to get it down to uncolored wood.

 

There are some transparent finishes that merely look dyed.

 

Hope for the latter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Thanks for the response!

 

It's my Dean Edge, made in Korea, so I would guess it's just a transparent finish? What I'm wondering is what layers usually are involved, as I found out a little too late about the second layer the last time, and went trough it at some spots, resulting in unpleasantness :(

 

 

 

Don't have my terminology up to speed, language barriers and all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

If you don't want to go through any layers of venier, you might try a chemical stipper to pull the finish out of the wood without actually removing any material.

 

To get remaining discolouration out, you could look into using a wood bleach.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

If it is transparent there will be a sealer/bonding coat (clear), color coat(s) and final clear coats.

 

Dyeing can be done a couple of ways - dye is applied directly on the raw wood, or there is a light sealer applied and then the dye. Either of these will allow the dye to penetrate the wood at least a little. If the dye is applied to raw wood then it depends on the wood and how thin the dye was.

 

You will have fewer issues with a transparent than with an opaque. Opaques can have a myriad things under them. Transparents are cool because once you are through the color coat then you are done.

 

I would stay away from strippers if your intention is to be able to see the figure on the refinish. Strippers will take the color that exists and let it wick into the wood, and bleach generally will not remove solvent-based colors or stains.

 

Get an economy pack of 200 to 320 grit paper (it will take alot of paper and alot of time) - trifold it or use a pad so as not to rub finger grooves into the raw wood - use circular strokes until you are through the color. Go to 400 grit once the color is gone going with the grain then do what you intend to.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Get an economy pack of 200 to 320 grit paper (it will take alot of paper and alot of time) - trifold it or use a pad so as not to rub finger grooves into the raw wood - use circular strokes until you are through the color. Go to 400 grit once the color is gone going with the grain then do what you intend to.

 

 

Thanks, that was the way I thought of going. I intend to get a natural finish, so I'd guess once I'm through the colour, I'm done, yes? Or maybe I'll get someone to spray on a clear coat over that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...