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Never forget...


oldivor

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... that policemen put their lives in danger every day so that you can be safer. Sadly somethings they pay for their service for the greater good with their lives.

 

cfiles23404.jpg

The Richard V Woods Memorial Bridge

 

 

http://www.southcarolinafop.com/printpage.asp?ref=2564

 

DATE: Thursday, March 02, 2006

 

By LORI YOUNT

The Beaufort Gazette

 

The man convicted of killing Cpl. Richard Woods Sr., a Beaufort Highway Patrol officer, more than 36 years ago was denied parole Wednesday.

 

The state's Parole Board rejected the early release of 78-year-old Forrest Ward Phillips, whose eligibility will come up again in 2008.

 

Phillips, who is serving a 999-year sentence for the 1969 shooting death of the Highway Patrol officer, has been eligible for parole every two years since 1992.

 

On Aug. 15, 1969, Woods was chasing Phillips and two other men as they fled police after breaking into a Beaufort home. When the men crashed their car into another car at the entrance of Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, Phillips ran to another car, where he kidnapped a young Marine and his family.

 

When Woods approached, Phillips shot him through the driver's-side window. Woods died four days later, and Phillips was captured almost two months later in Cincinnati.

 

The Richard V. Woods Memorial Bridge connecting downtown Beaufort to Lady's Island was named in his honor.

 

Since 1992, Woods' widow and children have been collecting signatures in local stores and law enforcement offices to oppose Phillips' release. Richard Woods Jr., Woods' son and chief of the Ridgeland Police Department, said they had collected about 6,000 signatures for Wednesday's hearing. About 20 Highway Patrol officers came to Columbia to support the denial of Phillips' parole, he said.

 

Cpl. Woods' widow, Anne Woods, died in August 2004.

 

Now Chief Woods and his sister, Wendy Wekenmann, carry on the fight to keep Phillips in prison. They were 4 and 8 years old, respectively, when their father was killed.

 

"We've been doing this forever," Woods said. "Unfortunately, it's part of life."

 

However, he said he isn't worried about the elderly Phillips, who is failing in health, ever living outside of prison bars.

 

"He's decided where he's going to go," Woods said. "He will sit there till he dies."

 

 

 

R.I.P. Richard, even though it's almost been 38 years.

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Any relation?


RIP, Richard.
:(

 

Yes, he's on my father's father side of the family. :( It angers me that people have to do things like this. You rob a house then kidnap a family then shot and kill a policeman. IMO he shouldn't even be up for parole. :mad: Thankfully he's going to be in there unless 08 and hopefully until he dies.

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+ 1. Kill a cop and you should never get out - assuming you don't get the death penalty.

 

 

Kill ANYONE you should never get out, cop or otherwise. I don't value killing a cop any higher than killing someone else, it's tragic on every level equally.

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Kill ANYONE you should never get out, cop or otherwise. I don't value killing a cop any higher than killing someone else, it's tragic on every level equally.

 

 

+2

 

Sorry to hear about your loss oldivor. Unfortunatley some feel the need to harm others.

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I don't know why I felt the need to post this here. I was talking to some one and this some how came up. I dunno, it's so sad that a 4 and 8 year old had to grow up without a father. It's not like he was responsible for his death at all. It stuck me as very tragic for some reason.

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