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I have a tone issue


browndog021

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I have a svt3pro and a hlf410 cab. I use an ibanez rd 500(active) a boss limiter enhancer, and a sans amp bass driver. Just curious if anyone had any experience with eqing or setting up this head to sound tight and punchy. I seem to be very boomy sounding and have been trying different settings for about 2 months now.

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I seem to be very boomy sounding...

 

I don't know that amp. What have you tried? Are you using extreme EQ settings? Try setting it flat--bass (if applicable) & amp--and change try adjusting the frequencies just slightly.

More gear-experienced folks may also post & give more ideas.

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Well I read that boosting your mids can lead to a boomy sound, so I cut my mids. I have tried all of the recommended settings in the owners manual but they are also quite boomy. I have set the thing up at home and got decent tone but I had to tweak it as soon as we started playing because I was lost in the mix.

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Used to have the 3pro/410HLF set up. the HLF cab is BOOM incarnate. Keep everything flat, Max the master volume (on the right) and use the pre-gain to set your level. Do NOT use the deep switch. Keep your bass' EQ and the sans amp flat until you hear it at a gig or rehearsal. The HLF had a hard time punching, for me, cuz it just has SOOOO much booty. If you're not cutting through, try a slight FROWN face on the graphic eq. What styles are you playing? Sounds like hard rock/metal form your set up? Ditch the limiter, the tube pre in the 3 pro will add enough compression that you dont really need it. Good luck!!!

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I also moved my cab out of the corner to a further location.I am trying to point it so the sound waves do not hit the opposite side of the room in a straight line.I was thinking of investing in a BBE sonic maximizer stomp before trading in this head for the 4pro.(more headroom)

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Lows are what make your sound boomy. Mids mainly help you cut through and give body to your tone. Sounds like you've got to much low end on your EQ. Having more high-mids will give you more punch and definition.

Ampeg stuff is naturally kinda boomy and muddy anyway, particularly the cabs.

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Yup, you're cutting the frequencies you need to cut through. You will probably HATE the tone you get solo, but love it with the band. The 4pro's headroom would help, but the 3 pro should be plenty. What are the rest of your band playing? Moving it away from the wall will reduce boom, angling it may also work, reduce standing waves.

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Yup, you're cutting the frequencies you need to cut through. You will probably HATE the tone you get solo, but love it with the band. The 4pro's headroom would help, but the 3 pro should be plenty. What are the rest of your band playing? Moving it away from the wall will reduce boom, angling it may also work, reduce standing waves.

 

 

+1

 

Where is the Blend knob set on your SansAmp? I found that backing it off to about 11:00 works well to get rid of the muddyness. I've also started backing the bass & treble to about 11:00 as well. Sounds like crap solo, but it's heaven in the mix with my P-Bass.

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My rhythm guitarist uses a strat nd a fender cyber twin? with built in effects and the lead guy is an ibanez man with a marshall and a crate in stereo.We currently do not run through the pa but I think it will make a big difference for filling out our sound. I plan on running direct out of the sans amp and just blending slightlywith the pa.I usaally have my blend knob maxxed on the sansamp.

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+1 on trying adifferent cab vice a new amp. GK will give you a very punchy sound, but rhe HLF is still boom city. Also keep in mind you will hear different things at different volumes, especially more bass. Hell, try cutting the bass, and messing with the SAs blend control sounds like a good idea too. Running a muddy sound through the PA will just put a muddy sound in the PA :) Tryt he 3 pros DI, its clean quiet and sounds really good.

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Try this with your SansAmp. Back the bass & treble knobs all the way down, set the blend at 12:00, set your level so when you switch the Sansamp on & off there's no volume differnce, then start adding bass & treble if you need it. I think the controls on the Sansamp are all boost and no cut.

 

Too much blend & bass will sound muddy in the mix.

 

 

Did that make sense?

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- Try taking the Sansamp out of the chain. It can cause too much low/high.

- Make sure you have enough input gain, but not too much.

- If things sound too "constricted" then it's too much gain.

- The lows aren't causing the boom, it's the low mid.

- Having said that, don't boost the bass more than 3:00 if you can help it.

- Try cutting 200-500hz. Alternately, you can boost at 800hz.

- Personally when I boost at 800 I have to boost a lot, like 2:00-3:00.

- I find "modern basseses" like to have 400hz cut.

- I find that "fendery basses" like to have 800hz boosted.

- I know that 800hz is the #3 position on an SVT.

- I think positions 1 and 2 are the 2-something and 4-something ones.

- I find that amps now have a lot of "boom."

- This seems to compensate for the "smiley EQ" everyone tries to use.

- If you play with a pick, you'll probably not want to boost high mid. (800hz +)

- If you play with your fingers, you may find that you prefer boosting high mid, unless you have a heavy hand.

 

These are all my personal opinions.

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