Jump to content

Difference in Precision and Jazz Bass Sounds


ZooropaTV

Recommended Posts

  • Members

P-Bass--- woofy, thumpy big bottom, with a chunky neck. Let you fingers do the talking.

 

Jazz--- more of burpy twang, it can almost get the P-Bass sound but not as full, wider charge of sounds and a narrower neck.

 

You wanna shake da earth P-BASS

You shake and express skill JAZZ

 

As long as you don't get a BC Rich aka the Jagged Oar.

 

:rawk: ON

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

 

P-Bass--- woofy, thumpy big bottom, with a chunky neck. Let you fingers do the talking.


Jazz--- more of burpy twang, it can almost get the P-Bass sound but not as full, wider charge of sounds and a narrower neck.


You wanna shake da earth P-BASS

You shake and express skill JAZZ

 

 

I'll never understand these types of descriptions. The Jbass pickups have a more even broad spectrum response. The Pbass pickup has a midrange hump. Additional variation in tone on the Jbass comes from the bridge pickup placement, which brings more emphasis to the midrange.

 

Due to it's midrange emphasis, the Pbass naturally does a good job of finding its place in the mix, sitting above the kick drum and below the guitars. Conversely, the Jbass tends to saturate the entire mix below the guitars. Both instruments can be used extremely effectively in any genre, whether live or in the studio.

 

Additonally, while both Pbass and Jbass pickups are single coils, the Pbass pickup is split with the two halves be wired to constantly cancell hum. On the Jbass, the two pickups are wired such that the only time hum is eliminated is when both pickups are set the equal volume.

 

I'm not the best at providing examples of where each as been used because I get bored tracking down links, but here is a great resource for hearing the differences in different genres and different strings:

 

Pbass:

http://www.lakland.com/multimedia/ac_glaub.htm

 

Jbass:

http://www.lakland.com/multimedia/ac_osborn.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I disagree...

 

Anyway, a precision has more of a humbucker sound to it: fat, round sound. You can hear precision basses in every kind of music because no matter what setting you put them in, they have the ability to sound good. They also have thick necks (about 1.75 in. at the nut, I think). John Entwistle, James Jamerson, and countless others played precision basses.

 

Jazz basses growl a little more because of the bridge pickup. With both pickups on, the jazz bass sounds like a precision, but with a bit more agression. Jazz basses are more diverse than precisions when it comes to tone. Soloing the neck pickup, you get a responsive, snappy sound. Soloing the bridge pickup gives you a really punchy sound with a strong treble and midrange presence. Mixing and matching the two can give you unlimited options, as well as varying the tone knob. Jazz basses have thinner necks (1.5 in. at the nut). Geddy Lee, John Paul Jones, and Jaco Pastorius played jazz basses.

 

However, both basses sound great weather use roundwounds, flatwounds, your fingers, a pick, or slap. The possibilities with these two instruments are endless.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Excellent links for the bass sounds. The P sounds like the J using the neck pick-up as far as I can tell but when you use both or just the bridge pick-up on the Jazz you get a lot more mids, which I like because they'll cut thru better then just bottom will. Guess that's why I went with a Jazz instead of a P. :thu:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

the difference between the tonalcharicteristics between the two models is in the location of the PUP's

a shield over a PUP can also change the tone as well

also a single PUP Bass will not have very much of a tonal variance compaired to bases with multiple Pickups

That is a prerequisite for me when I am looking at bass guitars it has to have more than 1 pickup.

 

Just thought I would add my two pennys worth in:blah:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

P-basses can growl and bite and crunch. But they also have great lows and mids. It depends on the strings etc etc. I love the nice thick neck on mine.

 

All the j-basses I've played have a funky highend to them. They growled also but a higher growl. Adn the lows seemed like something wasn't there.

 

That's just my opinion though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I used to have a Spector with both types of pickups. The P pickup would have more low-end, and a "muddier" sound. The jazz had a brighter, more expressive tone. If I wanted the bass to drive the rhythm or just sit on that lower foundation, then the P worked well for me. I never really used the jazz pickups alone, but would sometimes split the signal between the P and the J's to get a lower, growly type of sound. The PJ pickup combo worked well in a situation where I was trying to be heard more clearly through the mix. (like Geddy Lee on Rush) Course you can always mess around with the bass, treble, tone, midrange , effects, etc. to get the tone you like.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...