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Low Pass Filter


xOriginalNinjax

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So, I wanna make my own LPF for recording the DI on my bass. Preferably set at 70-75hz. XLR in/out. Gain control. How hard would this be to do? Expensive? Etc. My band is recording and I put a Low Pass on the DI recording (Digital) but to get good volume, I get near-clipping/clipping levels, so I thought it'd be easier to put one on the recording and get it level that way, then tweak it down or up minorly.

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It makes sense to me, but not for his stated purposes - I'd like to try something similar for reinforcing the lows, basically bi-amping with one signal being full range and the other (heading towards the Whappo Grande) being lows only.

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Freestyle, you don't count. Sorry, I posted this and had to go out of town for the night. I DO want it that low because that's what I want the filter to do, I want it to produce ONLY shaking lows. Since I have the cab mic'ed, I'm getting all the other tone I need, the DI with the lpf is only to get lows that rattle everything in the entire room. It was the best frequency I could find to get the tone I wanted. I can give you a sample if you'd like to understand the tone I'm goin for...but you can't really tell without a sub. Basically, I am using the DI to reinforce some SERIOUS lows in the bass...

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No, I know exactly what you mean. Just make sure you're not interfering with the kick drum's audio territory. It wouldn't hurt to run subs on the guitars as well if you're doing what I think you're doing. Check out Fear Factory's setup -- guitarist uses four stacks with a 4x12 on top and a 15" active sub on the bottom.

 

EDIT: Just keep in mind that you're not going to get any lower than the fundamental. Cutting off everything at 75 isn't going to boost everything under 43, and if you're tuned standard, that's pretty much as low as you're getting without some kind of octaver.

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No, I know exactly what you mean. Just make sure you're not interfering with the kick drum's audio territory. It wouldn't hurt to run subs on the guitars as well if you're doing what I think you're doing. Check out Fear Factory's setup -- guitarist uses four stacks with a 4x12 on top and a 15" active sub on the bottom.


EDIT: Just keep in mind that you're not going to get any lower than the fundamental. Cutting off everything at 75 isn't going to boost everything under 43, and if you're tuned standard, that's pretty much as low as you're getting without some kind of octaver.

 

 

 

I know it won't BE lower, but it will SOUND lower...ya know what I mean?

 

Go to This link to listen to the different tracks I'm mixing and see what I mean...I think they MAY be mixed well enough as is...but still. Also, any tips would be appreciated on both tracks for mastering/recording.

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Thanks, hate you too.

 

Percieved fundamentals are your friend here. If your ear hears a 400Hz tone, a 200Hz tone and a 100Hz tone at the same time, your brain will interpret these as the 4th, 3rd and 2nd harmonics of a 50Hz fundamental, so will add the fundamental that isn't there. Result: you hear bass where there is none.

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yeah, i agree with what jazzad is saying. i listened to the tracks on myspazz, the one i liked the most was the mic only track. the mix track seemed a little bit "off". oh and the DI only track gave me a headache!!!
:mad:
( i have headphones on )

 

hehe, sorry....it's...low...or something like that...

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