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OT: I know there's some bikers up in here...


L-1329

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Been there...done that.

 

It's interesting when your riding it, it doesn't seem to take anywhere near that long to get from one end to the other. I guarantee I was not going close to as fast as the guy in the video on my cruiser. Scrapped a bunch of metal off my floorboards. One of my best vacations ever.

 

Dragon%20IMG%20Half%20Size.jpg

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You CAN turn both ways. If you point the wheel to where you want to go, you're just leaning to turn. It works, but is improper technique and has its limits. You push in the opposite direction of where you want to go so the.

 

Imagine if you're doing a left turn and you push left. You're gonna be leaning AND your wheel will be pointing to the ground. Your ass is flyin off!

 

Now imagine pushing the opposite direction with the wheel facing right while you're in the turn, and the side of the tires are what you're riding on. That's why bike tires are round, not flat. You turn on the sides of the tire, not the bottom middle.

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The lean is what turns the bike, the countersteer turn is what produces and maintains the proper angle of lean. Same thing works on a bicycle, but you really don't have to countersteer at all, just lean a bit in the direction you want to turn, holding the bars steady. The mass and power of the bike is the bike difference (not a motorcyclist, but I was a physics major. ;)

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Countersteering works. Maybe it has something to do with the weight or speed or whatnot, but bump the left handlebar to turn right, and the bike will try to fall to the left and the front wheel immediately corrects and turns left to prevent the fall. Bump right = left turn. Sounds weird, but it works.

 

I am on a middleweight cruiser, about 600 pounds plus rider. I have tried countersteering and it works, though I hardly ever use it.

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I am on a middleweight cruiser, about 600 pounds plus rider. I have tried countersteering and it works, though I hardly ever use it.

 

You use it every time you ride, but might not realize it. At walking pace/ parking lot speeds you are balancing the bike with your body and do turn the bars in the direction of turn. However, at any speed beyond that the only way a bike will turn is to countersteer the handlebars. What happens is the wheels will drive out from under the bike and the bike will fall into, or lean over. Then the tire shape turns the bike, the same as if you tried to roll a styrofoam cone. There is no other way to turn at speed. Try going from full left lean to full right lean, and back, and you'll definitly see what's happening. :cool:

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The centrifugal force of the turn balances the weight of the lean caused by the countersteer, that's what allows countersteer steering to work better at speed than "normal" steering on a motorcycle, where the centrifugal force will just throw the weight over, fall down go boom.

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having recently taken and passed the MSF safety course to get my license, i feel eminently qualified to discuss the subject. ;)

 

or more easily, allow me to quote from the MSF Basic Rider Course Handbook:

 

Unit III: turning

 

"There are four basic steps to turning a motorcycle: slow, look, press, and roll.

 

(bunch of descriptions which aren't really relevant here)

 

In most situations, you and the motorcycle should lean together.

 

In slow, tight turns like a U-turn in a parking lot, use a counterweight technique by leaning your upper body towards the outside of the turn. Turn your head and look where you want to go. Turn the handlebars more in the direction you want to go for tighter turns."

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Here's a vid from a guy I used to ride with. The opening scene is of a road not far from here. You'll have to download it because it's a large file.

 

http://www.sportbikerider.us/index.cfm?fuseaction=displayit&Picture_ID=124755

 

Totaly irresponsibe riding...that's why I no longer ride with these guys... ;)

 

Check out the digital speedo readings!!!

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Learning to use countersteering is is must. It allows you to control your turns. Sometimes when you take a curve you can misjudge the radius and speed that you approach the curve or you find that the curve's radius increases after you start into it. Many times all I did is keep my cool and push the handle bar in the direction I need to turn. I stayed in my lane and made the curve with no problem.

 

You can think about it anyway you want, but it is literally turning the handle bars in the opposite direction then you intend to go. It causes the bike to lean.

 

Here is a pretty good explanation:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Countersteering

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Hmmm, he's preaching about control of the bike and responsible riding, yet how many time in that video does he cross (or even pass on) the double yellow? He was clear across the other lane on one turn at least.

 

 

Eggzactly - Deals Gap is like amatuer hour....there are accidents, people riding way over their heads and vehicles being driven just as dangerously as motorcycles. I don't know the URL but there's a photosite form a couple of guys who photograph everyone that comes through - and catches quite a few accidents along the way.

 

I bicycled it years ago before the branding started - if I want to ride a highway like that today, Highway 16 between Yecora Sonora and Ja Junta Chihuahua is less traveled, much, much longer with beautiful mountains.

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