Jump to content

Fender MIA or MIM...?


fenderBOYroy

Recommended Posts

  • Members

There are two carbon rods inside the neck, one on either side of the truss rod. Not only do they help the neck stay put, they also help with dead spots. I think that every bass is going to have dead spots to some extent but the stiffening rods are supposed to go a long way towards providing consistent tone all of the way up and down the neck.

 

Thanks for the info. I always pictured it being like a shaft that the truss rod would slide through...like it sitting in a stiff graphite shaft for a golf club or something. :freak: That makes more sense, though. I would agree that it helps with the dead spot(s) (the G-string fret 4-6), but I don't really have much data to compare it to. The dead spots are minimal and have never had trouble with them. My fretless MIA Jazz has a little bit more pronounced dead spot, but that's to be expected, so I hear.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Thanks for the info. I always pictured it being like a shaft that the truss rod would slide through...like it sitting in a stiff graphite shaft for a golf club or something.

 

Interesting that you should say that! A buddy of mine used to work at a company that made composite rods. He's a guitarist and worked on getting the Fender acct for years. Finally landed them and he left the company after only one Fender order. Another huge source of revenue for the company was golf club manufacturers. So, the same company that makes Fender's stiffening rods, (if they're still being supplied by my buddy's old company), also makes golf club shafts!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Interesting that you should say that! A buddy of mine used to work at a company that made composite rods. He's a guitarist and worked on getting the Fender acct for years. Finally landed them and he left the company after only one Fender order. Another huge source of revenue for the company was golf club manufacturers. So, the same company that makes Fender's stiffening rods, (if they're still being supplied by my buddy's old company), also makes golf club shafts!

 

 

Cool...I thought that at least the materials had to be close...they say carbon/graphite and they can make graphite shafted golf clubs as stiff as tree trunks. It's working for Fender in my book.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Never had a problem with the neck or truss rod in the MIM Jazz bass. When I got it I tweaked it and it straightened right up. Stayed that way ever since. It has litteraly stayed in tune for weeks at a time. At the same time, it's possible that the cheaper (MIM) basses may be less consistent due to poor quality control or whatever. Some may be a lot better than others. I've found this to be true with even more expensive basses like the Stingrays.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Considering the rich history of guitar lutherie in Mexico, I have no problem with my Fender being made by Mexicans in either USA or Mexico. There's absolutely NO point to that stupid "joke".



The MIA instruments are almost completely different from MIM. I've owned both, as opposed to what I suspect is the ownership history of many of those who comment. What parts do the two have in common? Strings? Fret wire? They look, feel and play like what they are....different instrments. This is not to say that MIM are bad, only that you do indeed get what you paid for.

 

 

 

Hey, I'm a BIG fan of MIM Fenders - so I certainly meant nothing derogatory in mentioning Mexico OR Mexicans - and I don't have a problem with that situation either way...

 

I will openly state that I haven't owned any MIA Fenders - but I've played literally dozens of them over the years... I HAVE owned about half a dozen MIMs, a couple of MIIs, and one MIJ - and if you can state the difference between the machinery here in the US vs that in Mexico, I'd certainly like to hear it... How about the difference in materials???

 

Despite your assertions to the contrary, the ONLY differences between MIMs and MIAs are QC, the rods in the necks, and electronics - and that prices, that is - to my knowledge, a CNC machine operates the same in Mexico as it does here in the US...

 

 

" This is not to say that MIM are bad, only that you do indeed get what you paid for."

 

I just don't see the MIA Fenders being 3X the quality of the MIMs - speaking of "getting what you pay for" - sorry...

 

 

 

- georgestrings

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Never had a problem with the neck or truss rod in the MIM Jazz bass. When I got it I tweaked it and it straightened right up. Stayed that way ever since. It has litteraly stayed in tune for weeks at a time. At the same time, it's possible that the cheaper (MIM) basses may be less consistent due to poor quality control or whatever. Some may be a lot better than others. I've found this to be true with even more expensive basses like the Stingrays.

 

 

True to all this. I will add that the horror story that sticks out most in my mind was from a serious neck warp on a MIM Deluxe Active Jazz bass.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

A good bass is a good bass is a good bass. I have found with Fenders it's best to go to a store that has a lot of them, play every one on the wall, regardless of where it was made, and pick the best. I've played some expensive (As in an $1800 strat) artist sig guitars that were horrible and some MIM guitars that made me question taking out a few hundred more on a student loan.


Play them all, pick the best, leave the rest.


Dustin

 

 

 

EXACTLY!!!! I don't care at all about origin - I care how an instrument plays and sounds... I think that *some* players seek validation via their instruments, rather than their playing - to be perfectly honest...

 

 

 

- georgestrings

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Despite your assertions to the contrary, the ONLY differences between MIMs and MIAs are QC, the rods in the necks, and electronics -

 

That's not correct. MIA's also have strings-thru the body bridges--a feature that I also very much appreciate for sustain. So, while there is machining on both (which can be very very different depending on tolerancing and the CNC's themselves), there is more machining on the MIA's. :)

 

 

Plus, the frets are rolled for a very nice 'broken-in' feel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Not sure about the nut material...mine appear to be plastic.

 

One other nice-ness of the MIA basses...they come with a case.

 

I don't mean to sound argumentative about this, but I am very biased towards the MIA Fender Jazz and P basses. They've served me well for many years. I have no doubt that MIM's can do the same, but the features that are offered on the MIAs have always been worth the money for me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

That's not correct. MIA's also have strings-thru the body bridges--a feature that I also very much appreciate for sustain. So, while there is machining on both (which can be very very different depending on tolerancing and the CNC's themselves), there is more machining on the MIA's.
:)


Plus, the frets are rolled for a very nice 'broken-in' feel.

 

 

Yeah, I forgot about string through the body - but honestly, sustain has never been an issue with any Fender or Squier for me...

 

 

 

- georgestrings

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I don't know, but do you really think it's worth a $700 difference??? I don't...



- georgestrings

 

 

 

Again, sorry to be argumentative...but the MIM goes for $449, the MIA $1049...that's $600, not $700. And that includes a case, so whether it's worth $100 or not, it would still cost $100...so that's a $500 difference.

 

$500 for better fretwork, nicer tone/volume knobs, better electronics, strings-thru bridge and the associated machining, graphite rods and the associated machining, and tighter tolerances (which in any industry, you'll note that every time you tighten that plus or minus, the cost goes up).

 

Worth $500 difference? Maybe not quite comparing apples to apples...but it's close, and in my opinion, I've made good decisions with all the MIA purchases I've made.

 

(Of course, one of my P-basses I got used for 600...only $150 over what you'd pay for a new MIM...the other one I got used for $535! Only $100 over what you'd pay for a new MIM.) :thu:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

a step up from the MIM basses are the newly redone highway one series. they have the badass2 bridge and a nitro finish that lets the wood breathe and age over time. they are a few hundred cheaper than the MIA standard basses and leaps and bounds better than MIM. might be worth a look if you already have not made your mind up.

 

 

 

I'm really diggin the picture at MF/GC of that honey blonde Hwy 1 Jazz.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I have to say that any bass series has the potential to have jewels and lemons, and Fenders are no different. I have played on a few MIM Jazz and P basses that really impressed me in the past, however the majority have fallen well short of that bar. On the flip side, most MIA Fenders Ive played(I own 4, two original 78 Jazzes and a pair of American Standards (one Jazz & one P-Bass)are excellent ,though there has been the occasional one Ive picked up and found to be pretty bad in quality control. Its really gonna come down to a couple of things.

One, try to play the bass you are interested in if at all possible(not all basses are created equally!) and Number 2, go with whatever amount your budget can honestly afford. A MIM with upgrades might make for a dynamite bass, but youll need to decide if it is good enough as is before modding it, or will you need to spend even more $$ to get what you want out of it. And keep in mind that a MIA Fender for a few hundred more(or maybe even almost equal in price if you buy used) may be the better deal in the long run.

Take your time check them out in person,let your hands & ears be the judge.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I feel theres no substitute for an American made Fender. I bought an SX, modded it and it was pretty nice but no way came close to my MIA P bass in feel, solidness, tone and just plain mojo. I sold the SX because I would rather just save for an MIA Jazz.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Though I'm not familiar with the mim's from 10 yrs ago, the current ones are VERY decent to excellent instruments, only exception being the stock strings & the occasional "bad-one" that someone runs across. But bad-ones happen with far more expensive instruments as well. For example, I was shocked to learn that one could pay thousands for a Custom USA Sadowsky . . . & it could have "dead spots" just like many far less expensive "mass produced" instruments. Personally, I wouldn't be a happy camper spending thousands & having the same "issue" as a few hundred dollar mass produced instrument . . .


:eek:


mim's ROCK!



:thu:


imo

 

I agree. My MiM is awesome. Would I trade it straight across for a MIA? Yup...but it would not be as personal as mine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...