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Navybass65

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It's amazing how many people actually have one track minds....I'll explain.

 

Looking at the prices of vinage Feders, Gibsons, and Rics (even newer Rics), it's amazing how much people will spend for these things.

 

I'll admit that I used to admire vintage pieces, but that was until I wised up.

 

Think about this, do these vintage pieces really have anything special that would command the large sum of money? Answering in one word...No!

 

Ok, they're rare, but why are they rare? Because in the 70's and early 80's, Japaneese investors came over and bought them all up. These people, who probably never played a guitar in their lives, hoarded these pieces and kept them from the true players.

 

Do they have that special tone that no other instrument can reproduce? Nope. They may have a special tone, but other instruments that are made today and can be bought for much less can also make that special tone.

 

Will they make you play like the famous musician that played them? For that matter, will they make you play any better? The answer to both those questions is also No.

 

Really, when you get right down to it, the only thing a vintage instrument is good for is so that the owner can say "Lookie what I have". What he should say is "Lookie what I just spent a small fortune on for no real reason other than bragging rights".

 

Before anyone accuses me of writing this out of jealousy or any other reason, let me just say that I used to have many different vintage Fenders, Gibsons, and Rics. I got rid of all of them for a few reasons.

 

1. I was afraid to take them to a gig for fear they might get stolen.

2. There are many other instruments out there that can get the job done just as well or even better.

 

 

This was mainly directed at the vintage Fenders, Gibsons, Hofners, and Rics, because those seem to be the only companies that command real big bucks in the vintage market. Although, other brands are getting up there in price, and the funny thing is that some of those brands were pieces of crap when they were made, and still are, even with age. What I'm talking about there are the early 70's Harmonys, and other cheap Japaneese 70's stuff. Maybe someday people will realize that even though it is older, it's still junk. A piece of crap may change it's appearance with age, but it's still a piece of crap. Now, don't take that the wrong way, I don't mean that last statement to be directed towards the older Fenders, Gibsons, Hofners, and Rics.

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I paid $275 for an early '60s Jazz Bass (sunburst, clay dots, no binding) in 1978 because it was cheap and sounded good. I wish I still had it---I could sell it and get a new car.:D

 

Vintage prices are nuts, and so are the people willing to pay for them. Sure, vintage basses may be good investments, but why own an instrument if you're not going to play it? :idk:

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I paid $275 for an early '60s Jazz Bass (sunburst, clay dots, no binding) in 1978 because it was cheap and sounded good. I wish I still had it---I could sell it and get a new car.
:D

Vintage prices are nuts, and so are the people willing to pay for them. Sure, vintage basses may be good investments, but why own an instrument if you're not going to play it?
:idk:

 

I remember back in the early 80's you couldn't give away the 70's Fenders, no-one would even look at a Gibson bass, and Rics were a dime a dozen.

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Unfortunately it looks like vintage instruments are more of an investment to people than an actual instrument. I personally buy instruments that I like.. I've got one (maybe two?) vintage instruments, the first being a set of Ludwigs from 1968. They're the best sounding drums I've ever played, and they're sexy as {censored}.

 

 

If the instrument isn't that {censored}-hot to begin with, what's the point? It kind of reminds me of the people that take original Volkswagon Beetles with the stock engines to car shows. Sure, it's a car, and it's old....but what's the point?

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My Rickenbacker 4001 has a very distinct sound not easily copied by another bass. I could have gotten a new 4003 or another 4001 instead of the one I bought. They were all {censored}ing expensive. And the one I got spoke to me more than the others.

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I agree completely.

 

As a player, I can't see myself owning some mint condition vintage guitar or bass. Mainly because I go ballistic with each and every tiny, unnoticeable scratch or dent I get on my current guitars, and not one cost over $700. I can't stand marking up the heads on my drum kit either, but it's unavoidable.

 

I'd go insane worrying about some vintage instrument that's worth 50k+. It would never leave the case.

 

As for getting some old and beat up "player's" vintage instrument, why the hell bother?? Obviously it's beat to {censored}, and that's why it's being sold. It probably won't play very well anymore, whether the frets are all but gone, or the neck has warped, or whatever. They're selling it because they don't want to play it anymore. If it was really some "holy grail" of an instrument, they wouldn't let it go.

 

And for God's sake...any Fender you find that's vintage is made of the same stuff! Alder or ash body + a maple neck with a maple or rosewood fretboard. Any of that is still around in abundance. I seriously doubt that the alder and ash they use now is any better or worse than what they used in the '60s and '70s on Fender instruments.

 

As for Gibsons, that's a bit different. A nice early '60s Gibson would be pretty different from a modern one. They were made to a lot better standards back then, and they actually used aged honduran mahogany. As of lately, Gibson has been getting criticized for quality control, chambering bodies on their guitars, and for not actually using honduran mahogany at all - let alone aged honduran mahogany. But, then you look at Gibsons from the '70s and they're disasters. Mismatched 3+ piece tops, made of God-knows-what, and in general very, very sloppy.

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You're viewing it from a musician's POV. Good condition vintage instruments are investments not tools.

 

 

Let's get down to the basics.

 

Were they designed to be an investment or a tool? A tool.

 

Why are they now an investment? There is absolutely no good reason at all.

 

Am I a musician? Yep, so why should I view it any other way.

 

Just because some non-playing idiot decides to think of it as an investment does not mean that I have to.

 

One good thing is that these same people are now trying to move some of these on ebay with high starting prices and they're not selling.

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The whole "greedy japanese golden-boy investors" thing is a tired myth that makes no sense at all.

People buy old guitars because they can and because they love them.

If you want to invest, even the average bank plan will get you better profits with much less troubles.

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Were they designed to be an investment or a tool? A tool.


Why are they now an investment? There is absolutely no
good
reason at all.

 

 

Most things that people collect start out as functional items. Stamps, coins, cars, toys. Baseball (and other) cards are the only thing I can thing of who's only purpose is to be collected.

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The whole "greedy Japanese golden-boy investors" thing is a tired myth that makes no sense at all.

People buy old guitars because they can and because they love them.

If you want to invest, even the average bank plan will get you better profits with much less troubles.

 

 

It may not make sense, but it isn't a myth. I can remember back in the early 80's going to guitar shows and seeing many oriental people buying up older Fender guitars and basses.

 

You may not believe it, and call it a "tired myth", but you can't convince me that it isn't true because I saw it with my own eyes.

 

Do they love them? Yes, but for a completely different reason than a musician would love them. They love them for the return on their investment.

 

I've also seen many oriental business men at Foxwoods Casino betting thousands of dollars on a single hand of blackjack. What does that have to do with this discussion? Not one thing on it's own, but when you think of that and put it in the perspective against the average bank plan, it might show that they have much more money to spend on frivolous things.

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I saw a bunch of "oriental" people down at the Burger King the other day. They are trying to horde all of the Whoppers!

 

Get a Whopper while you still can, the price is about to go up for no good reason. If you miss out, you'll have no one to blame buy yourself. Well, also the Japaneese investors, but mostly yourself.

 

 

Anyone know where I can get a good price on a mint Millennium Falcon?

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