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Bass Wiring Troubleshooting help!!!


Ender_rpm

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Ok, so I put DiMarzio Ultra Jazz pups in my fretless. THe bridge pup sounds fine, vol/tone work for it no problem. The neck pup sounds out of phase with itself. I followed the package directions and wired red as hot and green to ground, while soldering white and black together and insulating them. I can hear a thin sound, which leads me to believe its phase issues vice soldering (which i do suck at), as the circuit is obviously complete, or there would be no sound, yeah? It doesn't affect the sound of the bridge pup when both are on full.

 

Ok, now for the real question: Is there an easier/better way to trouble shoot this than unsoldering all the connections and trying all the possible combinations? Should I just wire white/black and loop red/green? Anyone had this issue? The Dimarzio website is very helpful for the guitar pups, not so much for the bas ones.

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Ok, so I put DiMarzio Ultra Jazz pups in my fretless. THe bridge pup sounds fine, vol/tone work for it no problem. The neck pup sounds out of phase with itself.

 

"sounds out of phase with itself"

 

What does this mean?

 

Before I do anything, I would call the tech support guys.

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Its a humbucking, dual coil pickup in a jazz size housing. Currently, it has the twangy sound i associate with positions 2 and 4 on a strat (or pos 2 on my parker). All of the strings are coming through, so its not that I only have on attached, so I defaulted to usign a word I understood. Kapiche?

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Its a humbucking, dual coil pickup in a jazz size housing. Currently, it has the twangy sound i associate with positions 2 and 4 on a strat (or pos 2 on my parker). All of the strings are coming through, so its not that I only have on attached, so I defaulted to usign a word I understood. Kapiche?

No, I don't

 

Do you mean it's trebley? You did say they blend well, right?

 

If there is no hum or hiss, they may be working as designed.

 

It should be like that, if I understand your description.

 

Still, give the tech reps a call, I'm sure they can help you before you tear things apart. If nothing else, you can confirm the wiring.

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Ok, let me try to esplain :)

 

Yes, the neck pup is trebly, weak, and lacking in volume. There is no extraneous hiss or buzz. When I have it full on, and bring in the bridge pickup, it doesn't change, which means its not that the pup is out of phase with the bridge one, ala a strat, but rather that its internal to that neck pup. It does not have the body of a Jazz bass neck pup, and form all the reviews I've read, these should have a loud, bassy, thumpy goodness, not this thin twangy crap. The bridge pup sounds good, perfect for soloing, but I need the neck pup thwomp.

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Ok, let me try to esplain
:)

Yes, the neck pup is trebly, weak, and lacking in volume. There is no extraneous hiss or buzz. When I have it full on, and bring in the bridge pickup, it doesn't change, which means its not that the pup is out of phase with the bridge one, ala a strat, but rather that its internal to that neck pup. It does not have the body of a Jazz bass neck pup, and form all the reviews I've read, these should have a loud, bassy, thumpy goodness, not this thin twangy crap. The bridge pup sounds good, perfect for soloing, but I need the neck pup thwomp.

 

Much better explanation. Now I got it.

 

The weak and lacking in volume from my experience can be from one of two things. One the pup is a bad one and the other is your solder joints as you pointed out ealier. One or more poor connections can give you a weak signal.

 

Take the connections off, practice some soldering on something other than your bass, then re-solder the connections.

 

Just what you wanted to hear, right? ;)

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Much better explanation. Now I got it.


The weak and lacking in volume from my experience can be from one of two things. One the pup is a bad one and the other is your solder joints as you pointed out ealier. One or more poor connections can give you a weak signal.


Take the connections off, practice some soldering on something other than your bass, then re-solder the connections.


Just what you wanted to hear, right?
;)

 

I don't even think he needs to do that...but without seeing the other side of the vol pot, I dunno for sure. I think the 2nd and 3rd lugs (hot and ground) need resoldered from cold-joints. But I want to see to make sure before I say that.

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Ha, yeah I'd liek to avoid that if all possible.


CAmera's not real good at close ups.

You're right.

 

How many wires we talking about for the soldering job? Is it three?

 

A good connection is only as good as its soldering.

 

Sorry, but that's what I would do.

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black and white are the hot and ground usually on the same coil.. i think you choked your pup

 

i could be wrong though as pups vary though in wiring colours..early s-d rick replacements used yellow instead of white...dohhh

 

but if i am right the red goes to hot and the green and white go together..

leaving the black as the tail end..

 

wait a minute is this a humbucker...i think i got it wrong...

 

why would jazz pups have differing coloured wires other than humbucking with a phantom coil

 

i ask myself realising i am awake again...

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black and white are the hot and ground usually on the same coil.. i think you choked your pup


i could be wrong though as pups vary though in wiring colours..early s-d rick replacements used yellow instead of white...dohhh


but if i am right the red goes to hot and the green and white go together..

leaving the black as the tail end..


wait a minute is this a humbucker...i think i got it wrong...


why would jazz pups have differing coloured wires other than humbucking with a phantom coil


i ask myself realising i am awake again...

 

 

I have these pickups. They are dual-coil humbuckers, meaning the E and A strings are on one coil and the D and G are on another, similar to a P, but squeezed into a Jazz housing. Each coil has two wires: one coil has white hot and green ground, the other has red hot and black ground. Whether you solder red to green or white to black, it doesn't matter. The instructions say solder white to black, and the red and green become your respective hot and ground.

 

If you don't already have one, go to Fry's or Radio Shack or whatever and pick up a multimeter that measures resistance. First, test the resistance of the pickup. Place one probe on the solder joint of the hot side and the other probe on the solder joint of the ground side. This measurement should be 12.3 kOhms. If it is not, there's something wrong either with the pickup or your solder joint. Test each coil, with one probe on the white-black solder joint and the other on first the hot, then the ground lead. Both of those should be just over 6 kOhms. Also test the white/black solder joint itself; touch a probe to the bare wire of each lead at some point beyond the solder joint (you may need to make a small nick in both wires that you'll cover up later), and make sure neither the probes nor the wires touch each other. That measurement should be zero ohms. If the solder joint is discontinuous, resolder it. If either coil is discontinuous or way off-spec, the pickup is bad; return it and get a new one.

 

Once you're sure the white-black joint is continuous (zero ohms), make sure it's well-insulated with a piece of electrical tape. Also make sure any nicks you've make in the wire with any cutting tool or the soldering iron are also taped, just for good measure. If that solder joint or any bare wire in that circuit touches any bare ground or signal conductor, you'll short-circuit half the pickup. I think this is your problem. If the white-black joint is making contact with a signal lead, that will make the red/black coil connect hot to hot, and the white/green coil connect hot to ground. The hot/hot coil in that case will cancel the hot-ground coil's signal as well as the noise, causing an out-of-phase signal.

 

If the pickup checks out, resolder the red and green connections and then check them. Remember, you can't always tell a cold solder joint by looking at it!. I find your method of soldering the ground wire somewhat odd; usually such connections are made to the back of the pot shell, not to the shaft or the side of the shell. Test that not only the solder joint, but the path from your solder to ground is fully continuous by touching one probe to the ground lead of the jack and the other side to the pot shell or the solder joint. Discontinuous = bad.

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I have these pickups. They are dual-coil humbuckers, meaning the E and A strings are on one coil and the D and G are on another, similar to a P, but squeezed into a Jazz housing. Each coil has two wires: one coil has white hot and green ground, the other has red hot and black ground. Whether you solder red to green or white to black, it doesn't matter. The instructions say solder white to black, and the red and green become your respective hot and ground.

 

 

props to you for that info...

they are a bit like the bart 9J's except bart hard wire the connection between the split coils..

 

as you say...

white to hot

green to red

and the tail end black to ground..

 

simple

 

do you think our friend has the black and red round the other way on the second pup..

 

also since they are wired with 4 wires is there a case for parallel wiring...?

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Test that not only the solder joint, but the path from your solder to ground is fully continuous by touching one probe to the ground lead of the jack and the other side to the pot shell or the solder joint. Discontinuous = bad.

 

my experience is to check continuity of the earths..grounds...without the pups being connected..

also i favour in situations like this..which i have also done myself and been baffled..is to quietly disconnect all wires....and start again with a cup of tea and a biscuit for company...slowly slowly catchee monkey..

 

as for connecting to the pots...using the daisy chain method is best..

 

i bend over the ground tap on the vol pots and hard solder them to the body..then wire the bodies to the jack..

not forgetting the bridge..

from the middle of the daisy head:bor:

sorry its early here and i just got up ...:idea: best check out another java

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