Jump to content

Chopping up Instruments


chunky-b

Recommended Posts

  • Members

Generally I love music and it scares me that people want to chop up instruments, kind of like book burning... But in this case, I have been asked by my daughters high school studio art teacher to chop up a box of old violins for a project they are doing. They are making three demensional art out of old (apparently no longer useful) instruments.

 

From my limited wood working skills, I know this thin wood will probably splinter like crazy if I take a power saw to them. Any suggestions? Blade types? I have a reciprocating saw, table saw, skill saw, and others... I guess I should tape the cut to try to keep the wood from splintering too bad. Any other suggestions?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

I guess I should tape the cut to try to keep the wood from splintering too bad. Any other suggestions?

Sharks with lasers on them. Good luck.:)

 

Seriously depending upon what types of cuts need to be made, a power mitre saw with a plywood toothed (lots of very little teeth for "fine" cutting) might be worth a shot. The Dremel rotary tool that kindness mentioned is also a worthy possibility.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Dremmel

 

With a cut-off wheel type attachement? I think I still have a set of rotary tool tips that had a blade like that in it. The teacher thought I could just run them across a table saw, but that would be a mess! :confused:

 

 

 

violin01.jpgviolin02.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators
With a cut-off wheel type attachement? I think I still have a set of rotary tool tips that had a blade like that in it. The teacher thought I could just run them across a table saw, but that would be a mess!
:confused:

I would be concerned about using the table saw with hollow pieces like a violin. But I digress. I'm not much of a woodworker other than replacing ugly plain pine molding in my house with new oak.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Sharks with lasers on them. Good luck.
:)

Seriously depending upon what types of cuts need to be made, a power mitre saw with a plywood toothed (lots of very little teeth for "fine" cutting) might be worth a shot. The Dremel rotary tool that kindness mentioned is also a worthy possibility.

 

I don't know if you can tell in the pictures, but the teacher wants each one cut at different angles (she put the masking tape on them to show approximate cuts.) One is just in half of the body. Others are at odd angles. The necks and tuning heads should be easy since they are solid wood. It's the bodies of light, thing wood that scare me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

I don't know if you can tell in the pictures, but the teacher wants each one cut at different angles (she put the masking tape on them to show approximate cuts.) One is just in half of the body. Others are at odd angles. The necks and tuning heads should be easy since they are solid wood. It's the bodies of light, thing wood that scare me.

 

 

Cutting it the long way does look like a disaster waiting to happen.

 

If you succeed you're a magician in my book.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Sliding miter saw with a good blade should work. I'd suggest a red "Diablo" blade, they cut damn nice with very little chip-out or splintering.

 

 

Will putting masking tape across the cut and then cutting through tape and wood help reduce splintering any?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

With a cut-off wheel type attachement? I think I still have a set of rotary tool tips that had a blade like that in it. The teacher thought I could just run them across a table saw, but that would be a mess!
:confused:

 

That is exactly what I was thinking. It can make very precise cuts that won't cause the rest of the instrument to splinter. I would still tape the cut lines, then I would then draw a line with a Sharpie and just Dremel right down the line. There might be any number of things that would work, but I don't know how much experimenting you want to do before you find something you are sure will work. Actually, to be fair, I'm not POSITIVE this will work, I've never cut a violin. But based on my experience with similar woods, I am quite confident a rotary tool will get the job done.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

 

i think i would fill them with expanding insulating foam and then cut them on a band saw.the foam could be cut out afterwards and it would keep the thin wood from splintering when you were cutting it.

 

 

The foam would also prevent the instrument from collapsing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...