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Random Louis Johnson clip


Psilocybin

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Good clip. It reminds me that I need to get BroM to come over and start helping me work on my slapping and popping. I can do it, I just need some help with incorporating it into my playing in a musical way.

 

 

No problem @ all.

 

But there's this: You gotta be willing to wear white cowboy boots and get down on your knees .. and let that funky thang in you be free!!!

 

 

Well .... I live close enough. Let's get at it!

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This is getting bumped because more people need to check out these clips. The tone he gets on the clip Brother Mango posted is just too good to miss. I need to get a rig that would give me that kind of nasty snarl.
:thu:

 

You know it ain't the rig, right? :thu:

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Ya know, it might be a good exercize to discuss who may have influenced whom. With Les Claypool, I hear Bootsy Collins moments, and glimpses of Louis Johnson.

 

Who might be credited as more of an influence on Flea's style? Might anyone want to correct my notion, and suggest that Les' style bears no resemblence to Bootsy's?

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I wish I had the background to discuss this. BroM, you might have to sit me down and take me through some of the analysis like I did with our hip hop production exploration and our Nirvana night...

 

 

Your knowledge is deeper & more thorough. But I'll gladly pull some ideas together so I can specifically point to songs. There are moments when I hear something and notice, "that's got Bootsy written all over it." Now, I need to go back and tie the examples to each other.

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For better or for worse, I think Flea's his own man. I'm familiar with all the icons of funk bass playing and he doesn't really sound like any of them, stylistically. Flea has time issues that dilute any possibilty of being "funky", to my ears at least.

 

 

I think I get what you're saying.

 

In no way would I suggest that Flea is a rip-off of someone else. I wonder if it's possible to dig down into another person's style and get a small whiff of their influences--even if they're doing a poor interpretation of their influences.

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But maybe knowing a bit about Flea and his background would tell us that he actually wasn't influenced by those same people. Didn't he want to be a horn player and looked down at non jazz musicians? I honestly know very little about him, but I think that might have been the case. If so, I would want to know how he developed as a bass player.

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But maybe knowing a bit about Flea and his background would tell us that he actually wasn't influenced by those same people. Didn't he want to be a horn player and looked down at non jazz musicians? I honestly know very little about him, but I think that might have been the case. If so, I would want to know how he developed as a bass player.

 

 

This is something that wouldn't be so hard to find real answers for. I believe he started out as a horn player, but I don't recall hearing that he aspired to be a great horn player. But we can find out ...

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I think I get what you're saying.


I wonder if it's possible to dig down into another person's style and get a small whiff of their influences--even if they're doing a poor interpretation of their influences.

 

 

It's very possible, if you're informed about the player in question, the players that influenced said player, and the genre they operate in.

 

I've picked apart Nathan East's playing for years. His Anthony Jackson, Abe Laboriel, and Chuck Rainey influences are very apparent, but he remains his own man as a fully experienced and refined player does. In his fretless days, Pino Palladino was obviously influenced by Jaco, but also retained his identity as well. When these guys play, it's cool to hear these little identifiable fragments of other players pop up in frameworks and structures you may not otherwise hear them in.

 

This applies to all instrumentalists - there's all sorts of players apparent in Stevie Ray Vaughan's playing and it's easy to tell that Najee listened to an awful lot of Grover Washington, Jr.

 

There's two sides, though. Eddie Van Halen always said that Clapton was his big influence, but I don't hear it. Jeff Berlin has hollered "Jack Bruce!!!" at the top of his lungs for decades, but I don't hear any Jack Bruce in him at all.

 

FWIW, I don't envision Flea sitting down and really copying anybody's stuff. He's literally had a non-stop career since day one and was probably too tied up working to really slow it down enough to focus on assimilating ideas and approaches.

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