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Noise Limits @ Venues...


been_effected

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The venue we're playing at in a few weeks has stipulated that we have a noise limit of 105dB. While I understand the dB principle, I've been trying to approximate how loud that would be in terms of amp settings, I'm guessing pretty low? Anyone else had this kind of limit before?

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We played a gig a month ago where they wanted us at 75db!!! I mean, we are a 3 piece 50s rock band, not a speed metal band or anything.

 

Our guitar player uses an Alpha Omega David amp, which is all tube and 30 watts, and I play an Ampeg B200R which is 220 watts. He sets his amp at about 3 or 4 and I set my amp at about 4.

 

All I can say is it sucked, had to keep turining down.

 

I am learning many venues like resorts REALLY want is low. We are going to rehearse a set of tunes where we play almost acoustic, and our drummer uses brushes and a small drum set. I guess it just depends what we are willing to do to get a gig.

 

Local rock clubs are no problem.

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We played a gig a month ago where they wanted us at 75db!!! I mean, we are a 3 piece 50s rock band, not a speed metal band or anything.


Our guitar player uses an Alpha Omega David amp, which is all tube and 30 watts, and I play an Ampeg B200R which is 220 watts. He sets his amp at about 3 or 4 and I set my amp at about 4.


All I can say is it sucked, had to keep turining down.


I am learning many venues like resorts REALLY want is low. We are going to rehearse a set of tunes where we play almost acoustic, and our drummer uses brushes and a small drum set. I guess it just depends what we are willing to do to get a gig.


Local rock clubs are no problem.

 

 

Sounds like what they really want is just background noise.

For that, I'd tell 'em to get a jukebox.

Rock-N-Roll is meant to be loud.

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The Bat & Ball Hotel in Surry Hills used to have one of these damn noise limiter things which would light up some coloured light bulbs when you hit certain decibels. Green = OK, Yellow = Pushin it, Red = TTFD and cut the PA.

 

Simple solution was to kick out the power cord to said limiting device and let everyone enjoy a rock band in all their glory.

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a loud symphony is about 95 db in the audience. Personally, I like listening to rock at that volume. If no one but your friends choose to sit at the nearest tables, you're probably over their limit. Radio Shack sells db meters for about $60. Not a bad addition to the tool box.

 

One of the local venues with their own PA starts the evening at 110 db and turns it up all night. Can't talk, order a drink, socialize. Generally sucks badly. (I've measured 124 db on the subs on the dance floor.) In my mind, that volume ruins a night for me. (I usually leave early, shrinking the crowd.)

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Yeah believe me I'd love to, but the bookers at this place are particularly anal, so I'm not in the mood to piss them off. Theres plenty of other venues we've played where we can kick it, I guess I'll just treat this one as a challenge

 

 

I hear what you're saying, but there just some venues that are not worth the effort. You get some places that will put on a metal show but want all amps turned down to 1...............WTF is the point in having booked a metal show in the first place?

Over many years gigging around Sydney I've pretty much worked out the venues that are good and those that we will steer clear of, no matter how much they reckon they're going to pay us. If we're going to play, WE want to enjoy it too.

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This is stupid...whatever happened to rock and roll bitches! Seriously though, it should be a comfortable level. I can see why some venues might have this kind of thing...basically because guitards can't turn their {censored} down and everyone else has to compete. So basically this is a guitard volume limit:D

 

 

Dan

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Anyone that's met me can tell you that I talk at 105dB. There's no way I could play at that volume and feel good about it.:D

 

I understand why some bars would want you to do that, but at a rock show, forget it. Even the crowd would feel like it wasn't loud enough.

 

And like DRTrooper said, if there are 100+ people there, it's going to be 105dB when the band isn't playing.

C7

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Anyone that's met me can tell you that I talk at 105dB. There's no way I could play at that volume and feel good about it.
:D

I understand why some bars would want you to do that, but at a rock show, forget it. Even the crowd would feel like it wasn't loud enough.


And like DRTrooper said, if there are 100+ people there, it's going to be 105dB when the band
isn't
playing.

C7

 

I hear you brotha, believe me...it ain't rock if it ain't loud, and if its too loud, you're too old.

 

 

 

 

I have the feeling since its a small room with a small PA (it's a very small, personal, intimate venue), that we won't be up that loud. It's no problem for me, the guitar'd won't be happy though haha

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...mmm basically yes
:)

 

What kind of music do you guys do?

 

Heres the kicker about those meters: They have nothing to do with mix - I can play a Bell patch or a Fantasy Pad on my keyboards that can be loud as {censored} and it will never light an LED/ move a needle - In the meanwhile, you can play a half-hearted (uncompressed) slap/pop and the meter will go through the roof....Bodies are usually the biggest influence because voice ambience can add to the overall sonic pressure AND, conversely, bodies can absorb frequencies -- Its not an exact science....

Also, where is the 105db measuring point?..... because "distance-from-source" ratios makes a big difference

Uninterrupted sound waves will roll off at about 6 db for a doubling of distance.

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105dB(A) is pretty f'n loud.

 

 

If they measure it 5 feet away, than that only puts them at 87db at 40 feet distance ( back end of a medium sized club).....while this is loud in an empty club, its kind of what a dance band needs to get asses moving when the crowd is at full tilt boogie......

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If they measure it 5 feet away, than that only puts them at 87db at 40 feet distance ( back end of a medium sized club).....while this is loud in an empty club, its kind of what a dance band needs to get asses moving when the crowd is at full tilt boogie......

 

 

Measured at the FOH desk, I have to add.

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My heart sinks whenever you carry gear onto the stage and you see the meter that cuts the electric.

 

Sometimes the owner will wink and say it's just for show so the council can see it. Others are no help at all. I've played at one place where the drum kit on its own (a pretty small fusion kit at that) was enough to trip the power out.

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Usually measured at FOH position, but sometimes at back of venue. 105 is actually pretty reasonable, lots of places want it under 95. It also depends on whether they're stipulating unweighted SPL or A-weighted.

 

 

I mixed Buddy Guy at the University of Maine in Orono a few years ago and they had a "strict" 95dBA limit at FOH. They had a meter with a big LCD display right at FOH position. Buddy came out for soundcheck. His tech handed him his guitar, he played a chord and the meter immediately went to 105dB. No PA on at this time. 3 or 4 guys in suits run over to me and say "you can't have it this loud!" I said that the PA system wasn't even on and that it was just his stage volume. They were like "well, you have to tell him to turn it down." I laughed and told them that if they wanted to tell Buddy Guy to turn down, they could, but I wasn't doing it. :D

 

They went away and came back later and told me that after speaking to Buddy's management and the people in charge of the theatre they were going to waive the SPL restriction for the show.

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This is stupid...whatever happened to rock and roll bitches! Seriously though, it should be a comfortable level. I can see why some venues might have this kind of thing...basically because guitards can't turn their {censored} down and everyone else has to compete. So basically this is a guitard volume limit:D



Dan

 

 

No, it's not stupid. I wish more venues would impose reasonable volume limits - I'd have a lot more of my hearing left (even though I normally use protection).

 

105db is not an unreasonable limit, and shouldn't require any special measures by any band that isn't intentionally obnoxiously loud. The post above mentioning 75db is kind of absurd, I'll agree with that - that basically means "no drums" unless the drummer is exceptionally talented at soft playing (rare in rock drummers), or has a serious drum enclosure or electronic drums.

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No, it's not stupid. I wish more venues would impose reasonable volume limits - I'd have a lot more of my hearing left (even though I normally use protection).


105db is not an unreasonable limit, and shouldn't require any special measures by any band that isn't intentionally obnoxiously loud. The post above mentioning 75db is kind of absurd, I'll agree with that - that basically means "no drums" unless the drummer is exceptionally talented at soft playing (rare in rock drummers), or has a serious drum enclosure or electronic drums.

 

 

I agree. I don't go to a club or bar to hear some {censored}ty band do their own crap version of "Santeria". I go to have some drinks and talk to my friends.

If there's a band, they need to have it reasonable and not blasting to where you can't even converse at an unreasonable volume. I know you're there and playing, because I see you. You dont need to try and blow people out, especially if you're not that great, which many bar/cover bands aren't.

 

In my country band it's the same way- people come out to dance and have drinks and meet people, yet my bandleader gets pissed at it. I'm like dude, we're not that amazing, and nothing pisses me off more than some cover band who thinks they're God's gift screwin' up the atmosphere by blowing your heads off w/ the PA.

 

When I want good music and it LOUD, I either go see an actual show for a local band, or a normal concert.

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